Archive for September, 2005

What’s in Your Digital Asset Catastrophe Plan?

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on September 30th, 2005

Anything? You likely have a disaster plan that addresses digital asset issues. The potential problem with a disaster plan is that it can be grounded in assumptions of relative normalcy: the building burns down, a tornado hits, a lower-category hurricane strikes. It may assume severe damage within a confined area and an unimpaired ability of federal, state, and local agencies (as well as relief organizations) to respond. It may assume that workers are not at the disaster site, that they are relatively unaffected if they are, or that they can evacuate and return with relative ease and speed. It may assume that your offsite tape storage or "hot" backup site is far enough away to be unaffected.

What it probably doesn’t assume is the complete devastation of your city or town; widespread Internet, phone, power, and water outages that could last weeks or months; improbable multiple disasters across a wide region surrounding you; the inability of officials at all levels of government to adequately respond to a quickly deepening crisis; the lack of truly workable evacuation plans; depleted gas supplies for a hundred miles in all directions; your evacuated workers being scattered across a multiple-state area in motels, hotels, and the houses of friends and relatives after trips or 20 to 30 hours in massive traffic jams; your institution’s administration being relocated to a hotel in another city; evacuees ending up in new disaster zones and needing to evacuate yet again; and the possibility of more local post-catastrophe catastrophes in short order.

Here’s some thoughts. You may need to have your backups and hot sites in a part of the country that is unlikely to be experiencing a simultaneous catastrophe. This will not be reliable or convenient if physical data transportation is involved. Your latest data could end up in a delivery service depot in your city or town when the event happens. Even if this doesn’t occur, how frequently will you ship out those updates? Daily? Weekly? Another frequency?

Obviously, a remote hot site is better than just backups. But, if hot sites were cheap, we’d all have them.

In terms of backups, how software/hardware-specific are your systems? Will you have to rebuild a complex hardware/software environment to create a live system? Will the components that you need be readily available? Will you have the means to acquire, house, and implement them?

Lots of copies do keep stuff safe, but there have to be lots of copies. Here are two key issues: copyright and will (no doubt there are many more).

You may have a treasure trove of locally produced digital materials, but, if they are under normal copyright arrangements, no one can replicate them. It took considerable resources to create your digital materials. It’s a natural tendency to want to protect them so that they are accessible, but still yours alone. The question to ask yourself is what do I want to prevent users from doing, now and in the future, with these materials? The Creative Commons licences offer options that bar commercial and derivative use, but still provide the freedom to replicate licensed data. True, if you allow replication, you will not really be able to have unified use statistics, but, in the final analysis, what’s more important statistics or digital asset survival? If you allow derivative works, you may find others add value to your work in surprising and novel ways that benefit your users.

However, merely making your digital assets available doesn’t mean that anyone will go to the trouble of replicating or enhancing them. That requires will on the part of others, and they are busy with their own projects. Moreover, they assume that your digital materials will remain available, not disappear forever in the blink of an eye.

It strikes me that digital asset catastrophe planning may call for cooperative effort by libraries, IT centers, and other data-intensive nonprofit organizations. Perhaps by working jointly economic and logistical barriers can be overcome and cost-effective solutions can emerge.

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    OAB, OAW, SEPB, and SEPW Zip Files

    Posted in Announcements on September 29th, 2005

    Zip files (with adjusted URLs that allow mirroring) for the above publications are available.

    • SEPB/SEPW (complete archive; will be updated as SEPB changes)
    • OAB/OAW (all files in one subdirectory)

    With the exception of the OAW, these publications are under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License (the OAW is under version 2 of the license).

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      All Publication Backup Files Deleted

      Posted in Announcements on September 27th, 2005

      Backups and Zip files for the OAB, PACS Review, SEPB/SEPW have been deleted from this site. The normal URLS are all working now.

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        PACS Review, SEPB, and SEPW Back Up at UH

        Posted in Announcements on September 26th, 2005

        Access to the PACS Review, SEPB, and SEPW has been restored at their normal URLs:

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          PACS Review, and OAB, and SEPB/SEPW Mirrors

          Posted in Announcements on September 23rd, 2005

          Roy Tennant has provided mirror sites. Thanks, Roy.

          http://roytennant.com/oab/oab.htm

          http://roytennant.com/pr/pacsrev.html

          http://roytennant.com/sepb/sepb.html

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            PACS Review Access

            Posted in Announcements on September 23rd, 2005

            The Public-Access Computer Systems Review could be unavailable for some indefinite period due to Hurricane Rita. However, it allows copying for noncommercial, educational use by academic computer centers, individual scholars, and libraries. It could be mirrored with some URL adjustment if it were done quickly.

            Zip file with all journal content

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              SEPB, SEPW, and OAB Access

              Posted in Announcements on September 23rd, 2005

              It turns out that the LISHost server is located in Houston, so access to SEPB, SEPW, and the OAB could cease for some indefinite period. However, since all of these publications are under a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License, they could be mirrored as long as that occurred quickly.

              • SEPB and SEPW in one zip file. No URL editing required.
              • OAB. Some URL editing required.
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                Temporary URL for SEPB

                Posted in Announcements on September 21st, 2005

                Due to Hurricane Rita, a backup of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography has been made available.

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                  Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog Update (9/13/05)

                  Posted in Announcements on September 13th, 2005

                  The biweekly update of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog (SEPW) is now available, which provides brief information on 14 new journal issues and other resources. Especially interesting are: Audit Checklist for Certifying Digital Repositories, "Reforming Scholarly Publishing and Knowledge Communication: From the Advent of the Scholarly Journal to the Challenges of Open Access"; Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, Version 59; Towards Good Practices of Copyright in Open Access Journals: A Study among Authors of Articles in Open Access Journals; and "Update on First Fruits of NIH Policy."

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                    Version 59, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

                    Posted in Bibliographies, Digital Scholarship Publications, Scholarly Communication on September 9th, 2005

                    Version 59 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available. This selective bibliography presents over 2,480 articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet.

                    The Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals, by the same author, provides much more in-depth coverage of the open access movement and related topics (e.g., disciplinary archives, e-prints, institutional repositories, open access journals, and the Open Archives Initiative) than SEPB does.

                    The "Open Access Webliography" (with Ho) complements the OAB, providing access to a number of Websites related to open access topics.

                    Changes in This Version

                    The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are marked with an asterisk):

                    Table of Contents

                    1 Economic Issues
                    2 Electronic Books and Texts
                    2.1 Case Studies and History
                    2.2 General Works*
                    2.3 Library Issues
                    3 Electronic Serials
                    3.1 Case Studies and History*
                    3.2 Critiques
                    3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals
                    3.4 General Works*
                    3.5 Library Issues*
                    3.6 Research*
                    4 General Works*
                    5 Legal Issues
                    5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*
                    5.2 License Agreements*
                    5.3 Other Legal Issues
                    6 Library Issues
                    6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*
                    6.2 Digital Libraries*
                    6.3 General Works*
                    6.4 Information Integrity and Preservation*
                    7 New Publishing Models*
                    8 Publisher Issues*
                    8.1 Digital Rights Management
                    9 Repositories, E-Prints, and OAI*
                    Appendix A. Related Bibliographies*
                    Appendix B. About the Author*
                    Appendix C. SEPB Use Statistics

                    Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources includes the following sections:

                    Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*
                    Digital Libraries*
                    Electronic Books and Texts*
                    Electronic Serials*
                    General Electronic Publishing*
                    Images
                    Legal*
                    Preservation
                    Publishers
                    Repositories, E-Prints, and OAI*
                    SGML and Related Standards

                    Further Information about SEPB

                    The HTML version of SEPB is designed for interactive use. Each major section is a separate file. There are links to sources that are freely available on the Internet. It can be can be searched using Boolean operators.

                    The HTML document includes three sections not found in the Acrobat file:

                    1. Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog (biweekly list of new resources; also available by mailing list)
                    2. Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources (directory of over 270 related Web sites)
                    3. Archive (prior versions of the bibliography)

                    The Acrobat file is designed for printing. The printed bibliography is over 200 pages long. The Acrobat file is over 550 KB.

                    Related Article

                    An article about the bibliography has been published in The Journal of Electronic Publishing.

                    Selected by Librarians' Index to the Internet

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