Archive for June, 2009

“Open Access Policy for University Of Kansas Scholarship”

Posted in Open Access, Self-Archiving on June 30th, 2009

The "Open Access Policy for University Of Kansas Scholarship" is now available.

Here's an excerpt :

Each faculty member grants to KU permission to make scholarly articles to which he or she made substantial intellectual contributions publicly available in the KU open access institutional repository, and to exercise the copyright in those articles. In legal terms, the permission granted by each faculty member is a nonexclusive, irrevocable, paid-up, worldwide license to exercise any and all rights under copyright relating to each of his or her scholarly articles, in any medium, and to authorize others to do the same, provided that the articles are not sold for a profit. This license in no way interferes with the rights of the KU faculty author as the copyright holder of the work. The policy will apply to all scholarly articles authored or co-authored while a faculty member of KU. Faculty will be afforded an opt out opportunity. Faculty governance in consultation with the Provost's office will develop the details of the policy which will be submitted for approval by the Faculty Senate.

In "More on the U. Kansas OA Policy,"Gavin Bakerr comments:

A Web version of the text of the University of Kansas' new OA policy confirms what I'd suspected in my last post: that the policy as passed doesn't contain an OA mandate. It commits the university to OA, gives the university permission to provide OA to its faculty's research via the IR, and establishes a task force to work out the details—including the details of how the manuscripts will get into the IR.

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    “Beyond Institutional Repositories”

    Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Institutional Repositories on June 30th, 2009

    Laurent Romary and Chris Armbruster have self-archived "Beyond Institutional Repositories" in SSRN.

    Here's an excerpt:

    The current system of so-called institutional repositories, even if it has been a sensible response at an earlier stage, may not answer the needs of the scholarly community, scientific communication and accompanied stakeholders in a sustainable way. However, having a robust repository infrastructure is essential to academic work. Yet, current institutional solutions, even when networked in a country or across Europe, have largely failed to deliver. Consequently, a new path for a more robust infrastructure and larger repositories is explored to create superior services that support the academy. A future organization of publication repositories is advocated that is based upon macroscopic academic settings providing a critical mass of interest as well as organizational coherence. Such a macro-unit may be geographical (a coherent national scheme), institutional (a large research organization or a consortium thereof) or thematic (a specific research field organizing itself in the domain of publication repositories).

    The argument proceeds as follows: firstly, while institutional open access mandates have brought some content into open access, the important mandates are those of the funders and these are best supported by a single infrastructure and large repositories, which incidentally enhances the value of the collection (while a transfer to institutional repositories would diminish the value). Secondly, we compare and contrast a system based on central research publication repositories with the notion of a network of institutional repositories to illustrate that across central dimensions of any repository solution the institutional model is more cumbersome and less likely to achieve a high level of service. Next, three key functions of publication repositories are reconsidered, namely a) the fast and wide dissemination of results; b) the preservation of the record; and c) digital curation for dissemination and preservation. Fourth, repositories and their ecologies are explored with the overriding aim of enhancing content and enhancing usage. Fifth, a target scheme is sketched, including some examples. In closing, a look at the evolutionary road ahead is offered.

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      Digital Library Jobs: Web Developer at DuraSpace

      Posted in Digital Library Jobs on June 30th, 2009

      DuraSpace is recruiting a Web Developer.

      Here's an excerpt from the ad:

      The Web developer will join the team designing, building, and supporting the DuraCloud durable storage service and related Web sites for the DSpace Foundation, Fedora Commons, and other open source projects. The developer will be responsible for all aspects of requirements gathering, technical analysis, and development, testing, and documenting customer-facing applications, working both alone and as a member of a team. The position, which reports to the Chief Technology Officer, requires a knowledgeable, enthusiastic, and self-motivated individual with extensive experience in user interface design on the Web and thorough grounding in HCI principles and practices.

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        Blog Report on Mass Digitization Mini-Symposium at Notre Dame, Plus Presentations

        Posted in Digitization, Mass Digitizaton on June 30th, 2009

        In "Mass Digitization Mini-Symposium: A Reverse Travelogue," Eric Lease Morgan reports on a mass digitization mini-symposium at the Hesburgh Libraries at the University of Notre Dame. His post includes links to the summarized presentations.

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          Fedora Repository 3.2.1 Released

          Posted in Digital Repositories, Fedora, Institutional Repositories, Open Source Software on June 30th, 2009

          The Fedora Commons has released version 3.2.1 of Fedora Repository.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          The current release of Fedora Repository is 3.2.1 is a minor upgrade that addresses a security issue discovered in Fedora 3.2. . . .

          Included within is the long-awaited, web-based administrative client, initial integration with the emerging Akubra storage-abstraction layer, many useful bug fixes, and the experimental release of a Fedora decoupled from the familiar 'fedora' context path.

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            Digital Library Jobs: Digital Projects Developer at Duke University

            Posted in Digital Library Jobs on June 30th, 2009

            The Duke University Libraries are recruiting a Digital Projects Developer.

            Here's an excerpt from the ad:

            Under the direction of the Head of the Digital Projects Department, the developer will explore, adapt, and support library information technologies for digital projects, including the application of standards, metadata, and discovery interfaces appropriate to specific projects. The developer is responsible for helping Library staff design user interfaces that successfully navigate and integrate various resources specific to research libraries.

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              Digital Video Shows Detailed Operation of Espresso Book Machine

              Posted in Print-on-Demand, Publishing on June 30th, 2009

              The article "Is This the Future Bookstore?" includes a digital video that shows the detailed operation of the Espresso Book Machine. Be sure to stick around after the first overview of the paperback production process for the subsequent close-up view.

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                Open Access—What Are the Economic Benefits? A Comparison of the United Kingdom, Netherlands and Denmark

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Communication on June 30th, 2009

                The Knowledge Exchange has released Open Access—What Are the Economic Benefits? A Comparison of the United Kingdom, Netherlands and Denmark.

                Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                In June 2009 a study was completed that had been commissioned by Knowledge Exchange and written by Professor John Houghton, Victoria University, Australia. This report on the study was titled: "Open Access—What are the economic benefits? A comparison of the United Kingdom, Netherlands and Denmark." This report was based on the findings of studies in which John Houghton had modelled the costs and benefits of Open Access in three countries. These studies had been undertaken in the UK by JISC, in the Netherlands by SURF and in Denmark by DEFF.

                In the three national studies the costs and benefits of scholarly communication were compared based on three different publication models. The modelling revealed that the greatest advantage would be offered by the Open Access model, which means that the research institution or the party financing the research pays for publication and the article is then freely accessible.

                Adopting this model could lead to annual savings of around EUR 70 million in Denmark, EUR 133 million in The Netherlands and EUR 480 in the UK. The report concludes that the advantages would not just be in the long term; in the transitional phase too, more open access to research results would have positive effects. In this case the benefits would also outweigh the costs.

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