Archive for September, 2009

Frankfurt Book Fair Publisher Survey

Posted in Publishing on September 30th, 2009

The Frankfurt Book Fair has released a summary of the results of a recent survey of 840 international publishing company representatives.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

As a general rule, digital products still only comprise a small fraction of sales: Around 60 per cent of those polled estimate that considerably less than ten per cent of their revenue will come from digital sources in 2009. However, this will change in the next two years in the opinion of those polled: 41 per cent of those polled calculate sales of up to ten per cent for 2011 and 58 per cent anticipate that digital products will comprise a considerably higher share of total sales. The percentage of those who assume that 26 to 100 per cent of their revenue will come from digital products in two years increased from 24 per cent (2009) to 38 per cent (2011).

The idea that digital content will generate more sales than the traditional book business is also gradually becoming more of a reality. Around 50 per cent of industry experts now see the year 2018 as the turning point: In a comparable survey taken one year ago, 40 per cent saw this date as a "changing of the guard." In 2008, 27 per cent were of the opinion that digital would never overtake print—today that number is only 22 per cent.

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    Library Systems Department Head at West Virginia University Libraries

    Posted in Library IT Jobs on September 30th, 2009

    The West Virginia University Libraries are recruiting a Library Systems Department Head.

    Here's an excerpt from the ad:

    The Head directs technology planning and customer service, and provides hands-on support for ExLibris/Voyager online catalog, library web services, digital collections, and an institutional repository. Supervises 5 staff. . . . The Systems Department maintains a library network with 600+ workstations, 120 laptops, 32 servers, a 5 terabyte storage area network, and a 5 terabyte preservation backup.

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      Mining a Million Scanned Books: Linguistic and Structure Analysis, Fast Expanded Search, and Improved OCR Grant Awarded

      Posted in E-Books, Grants, Mass Digitizaton on September 30th, 2009

      The NSF Division of Information & Intelligent Systems has awarded a grant to the Center for Intelligent Information Retrieval at UMass Amherst, the Perseus Digital Library Project at Tufts, and the Internet Archive for their "Mining a Million Scanned Books: Linguistic and Structure Analysis, Fast Expanded Search, and Improved OCR" proposal.

      Here's an excerpt from the award abstract:

      The Center for Intelligent Information Retrieval at UMass Amherst, the Perseus Digital Library Project at Tufts, and the Internet Archive are investigating large-scale information extraction and retrieval technologies for digitized book collections. To provide effective analysis and search for scholars and the general public, and to handle the diversity and scale of these collections, this project focuses on improvements in seven interlocking technologies: improved OCR accuracy through word spotting, creating probabilistic models using joint distributions of features, and building topic-specific language models across documents; structural metadata extraction, to mine headers, chapters, tables of contents, and indices; linguistic analysis and information extraction, to perform syntactic analysis and entity extraction on noisy OCR output; inferred document relational structure, to mine citations, quotations, translations, and paraphrases; latent topic modeling through time, to improve language modeling for OCR and retrieval, and to track the spread of ideas across periods and genres; query expansion for relevance models, to improve relevance in information retrieval by offline pre-processing of document comparisons; and interfaces for exploratory data analysis, to provide users of the document collection with efficient tools to update complex models of important entities, events, topics, and linguistic features. When applied across large corpora, these technologies reinforce each other: improved topic modeling enables more targeted language models for OCR; extracting structural metadata improves citation analysis; and entity extraction improves topic modeling and query expansion. The testbed for this project is the growing corpus of over one million open-access books from the Internet Archive.

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        CONTENTdm Image Viewer: dmMonocle 1.0 Released

        Posted in Digital Asset Management Systems, Digital Media, Open Source Software on September 30th, 2009

        The University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries have released dmMonocle 1.0.

        Here's an excerpt from the project page:

        dmMonocle is a stand-alone image viewer for CONTENTdm® collections, intended as a replacement for the default image viewer provided with CONTENTdm® 4.x and 5.x. The goal of the project is to make CONTENTdm® images, such as photos, maps, and scanned documents, easier to view and navigate. dmMonocle is written in JavaScript using jQuery, and provides patrons with the ability to zoom, pan, and rotate images on the fly without reloading the entire page. dmMonocle slices up large images into smaller square tiles, loading only the tiles in the visible area, much like Google Maps. In addition to the improved main viewing area, dmMonocle provides a thumbnail-sized navigator, showing patrons which part of the larger image they are viewing. The navigator may also be used to quickly move around an image

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          What to Withdraw: Print Collections Management in the Wake of Digitization

          Posted in Digitization, Libraries on September 30th, 2009

          Ithaka has released What to Withdraw: Print Collections Management in the Wake of Digitization .

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          Based on the expected continuing needs for print materials, this report considers the minimum time period for which access to the original will be required and assesses the number of print copies necessary to ensure that these goals are met. While complex, this methodology provides for a variety of risk profiles based on key characteristics, with preservation recommendations that similarly vary. For example, many materials that are adequately digitized and preserved in digital form, contain few images, and are held in certain quantities in system-wide print repositories may be safely withdrawn from local print holdings without impacting either preservation or access.

          At the same time, the report warns that other print materials may not yet be ready for broad withdrawal without threatening both access and preservation goals. For these materials, a number of strategies are recommended to increase the flexibility available to libraries in the future.

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            Enhanced Ingest to Digital E-Research Repositories: Final Report

            Posted in Digital Repositories, Fedora, Institutional Repositories, Metadata, Self-Archiving on September 29th, 2009

            JISC has released Enhanced Ingest to Digital E-Research Repositories: Final Report.

            Here's an excerpt:

            The project developed a demonstrator that implemented an enhanced deposit and ingest process to a digital repository based on Fedora. The process incorporates the SWORD API for deposit, and accepts deposits that contain multiple files (packaged as a zip file). The workflow performs preservation actions (e.g. capturing PREMIS metadata, format migration), extraction of resource discovery metadata (for text-based formats such as PDF, MS Word, HTML), and capture of publisher self-archiving policies (for post-prints). The resources are ingested into the repository following an atomistic model—individual files and directories correspond to individual digital objects, and relationships between them (i.e. the membership relation between files/directories) are represented as RDF statements. The workflow was constructed from a variety of components developed by other projects.

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              Oya Rieger's Presentation on "Enduring Access to Special Collections: Challenges and Opportunities"

              Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Mass Digitizaton on September 29th, 2009

              RBMS has made Oya Rieger's presentation on "Enduring Access to Special Collections: Challenges and Opportunities" (MP3 file and PDF file) available as part of its Selected Presentations and Documents from the 2009 RBMS Preconference page.

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                Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy

                Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication on September 29th, 2009

                MediaCommons Press has launched and released its first publication, Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy. MediaCommons gets support from the Institute for the Future of the Book and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

                Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                This book-in-progress focuses on the social and institutional changes that will be required within colleges and universities in the U.S. in order for digital scholarly publishing to become a viable reality.

                The manuscript is here published in full, in an commentable format designed to promote a new open mode of peer review.

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                  "Worldwide Use and Impact of the NASA Astrophysics Data System Digital Library"

                  Posted in Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Scholarly Metrics on September 29th, 2009

                  Michael J. Kurtz et al. have self-archived "Worldwide Use and Impact of the NASA Astrophysics Data System Digital Library" in arXiv.org.

                  Here's the abstract:

                  By combining data from the text, citation, and reference databases with data from the ADS readership logs we have been able to create Second Order Bibliometric Operators, a customizable class of collaborative filters which permits substantially improved accuracy in literature queries. Using the ADS usage logs along with membership statistics from the International Astronomical Union and data on the population and gross domestic product (GDP) we develop an accurate model for world-wide basic research where the number of scientists in a country is proportional to the GDP of that country, and the amount of basic research done by a country is proportional to the number of scientists in that country times that country's per capita GDP.

                  We introduce the concept of utility time to measure the impact of the ADS/URANIA and the electronic astronomical library on astronomical research. We find that in 2002 it amounted to the equivalent of 736 FTE researchers, or $250 Million, or the astronomical research done in France. Subject headings: digital libraries; bibliometrics; sociology of science; information retrieval

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                    The Google Books Settlement: Who Is Filing And What Are They Saying?

                    Posted in Copyright, E-Books, Google and Other Search Engines, Mass Digitizaton, Publishing on September 29th, 2009

                    ACRL, ALA, and ARL have released The Google Books Settlement: Who Is Filing And What Are They Saying?.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    The Association of Research Libraries, the American Library Association, and the Association of College and Research Libraries have prepared this document to summarize in a few pages of charts some key information about the hundreds of filings that have been submitted to the federal district court presiding over the Google Books litigation. The Google Books Settlement is the proposed settlement of a class action lawsuit brought against Google, Inc. by groups and individuals representing authors and publishers who objected to Google’s large-scale scanning of in-copyright books to facilitate its Book Search service. The Settlement would bind not only the groups who sued Google, but also most owners of copyrights in printed books ("class-members"), unless they choose to opt out of the Settlement. Class-members who opt out retain their right to sue Google over its scanning activities, but will not be part of the collective licensing scheme created by the Settlement. Under the Settlement, participating class-members will get a one-time payment in compensation for past scanning as well as a share of Google’s future revenues from its scanning activities. A new, non-profit entity called the Book Rights Registry will represent rightsholders under the Settlement going forward.

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                      Institute of Museum and Library Services Announces Award of National Leadership Grants to 51 Institutions

                      Posted in Grants on September 28th, 2009

                      The Institute of Museum and Library Services has announced the award of National Leadership Grants to 51 institutions.

                      Here's an excerpt from the press release:

                      The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), the primary source of federal funds for the nation's museums and libraries, announces the 51 institutions receiving National Leadership Grants (NLG) totaling $17,894,475. Projects by these institutions will advance the ability of museums and libraries to preserve culture, heritage, and knowledge while enhancing learning.

                      "Projects funded by IMLS's National Leadership Grants focus on education, health, computer literacy, and problem solving skills. We believe that museums and libraries play an important role in building a competitive workforce and engaged citizenry. We are equally confident that these institutions will elevate museum and library practice through this work," said Anne-Imelda Radice, IMLS Director.

                      NLG recipients will generate new tools, research, models, services, practices, and alliances that will positively impact the awarded institution and the nation.

                      Also see the list of grants by state.

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                        Kenneth Crews on the U.S. Department of Justice Google Book Search Settlement Filing

                        Posted in Copyright, E-Books, Google and Other Search Engines, Mass Digitizaton, Publishing on September 28th, 2009

                        In "Justice and Google Books: First Thoughts about the Government's Brief," Kenneth Crews, Director of the Copyright Advisory Office at Columbia University, discusses the U.S. Department of Justice Antitrust Division's filing on the Google Book Search Settlement.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        The filing is remarkable for its lucid dissection of select issues. It is diplomatic, and it holds out repeated hope for the continued talks among the parties to the case. But clearly the DOJ does not like what it sees.

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