Archive for February, 2012

CLIR and NITLE Will Launch Anvil Academic, a "Digital Publisher for the Humanities"

Posted in Digital Humanities, Publishing on February 14th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Council on Library and Information Resources and the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education will launch Anvil Academic, a "digital publisher for the humanities," in late 2012.

Here's an excerpt from the press release :

Anvil will focus on publishing new forms of scholarship that cannot be adequately conveyed in the traditional monograph.

"Increasingly, research in the humanities is dependent on large data sets and involves sophisticated algorithms and visualizations in the execution of that research and in the construction of the products of scholarship. Anvil will capture the environment in which this research is conducted: a linked ecology of scholarly expression, data, and tools of analysis that will over time become itself a place for new knowledge discovery," said CLIR President Chuck Henry.

Works published through Anvil will be available through Creative Commons licenses on the Web and as apps on portable devices. The title production system will be developed jointly by NITLE and CLIR for use by other institutions, each of which would have the opportunity to publish under its own imprint. . . .

"An important part of the Anvil experiment will be developing and testing new revenue models," said NITLE Executive Director Joey King. "Our current models, which rely heavily on institutional subsidies, author subventions, and revenue from sales of printed books, are not proving to be sustainable. With Anvil, we intend to explore alternative paths to sustainability as rigorously as we explore new publishing models."

The program received startup funding from the Brown Foundation, Inc., in Houston, Texas. Stanford University, the University of Virginia, Washington University in St. Louis, Bryn Mawr College, Amherst College, Middlebury College, and Southwestern University will also provide funds and staffing. Anvil Academic Publishing will work closely with innovative programs developed by the University of Michigan, especially MPublishing, and draw on Johns Hopkins University's exemplary experience with digital humanities project development.

| Digital Scholarship's Digital/Print Books | Digital Scholarship |

Current News: Twitter Updates for 2/13/12

Posted in Current News: DigitalKoans Twitter Updates on February 13th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

| Digital Scholarship |

Junior Web Developer at New York University Libraries

Posted in Library IT Jobs on February 13th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The New York University Libraries are recruiting a Junior Web Developer.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

Manage Libraries' web sites and ensure their accessibility and operation from conceptualization to launch, including, but not limited to, development of information infrastructure, oversight of database development, and content management solutions. Develop project plans for major site updates; create time lines to meet client deadlines and/or department goals; monitor progress and revise plans.

| Institutional Repository Bibliography | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

Users, Narcissism and Control—Tracking the Impact of Scholarly Publications in the 21st Century

Posted in Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Communication on February 13th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The SURFfoundation has released Users, Narcissism and Control—Tracking the Impact of Scholarly Publications in the 21st Century.

Here's an excerpt:

This report explores the explosion of tracking tools that have accompanied the surge of web based information instruments. Is it possible to monitor 'real-time' how new research findings are being read, cited, used and transformed in practical results and applications? And what are the potential risks and disadvantages of the new tracking tools? This report aims to contribute to a better understanding of these developments by providing a detailed assessment of the currently available novel tools and methodologies. A total of 16 quite different tools are assessed.

The report concludes that web based academic publishing is producing a variety of novel information filters. These allow the researcher to make some sort of limited self-assessment with respect to the response to his/her work. However, this does not mean that these technologies and databases can also legitimately be used in research assessments. For this application, they need to adhere to a far stricter protocol of data quality and indicator reliability and validity. Most new tools do not (yet) comply with these more strict quality criteria.

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

Technical Services & Digital Initiatives Librarian at Longwood University’s Greenwood Library

Posted in Digital Library Jobs on February 13th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Longwood University's Greenwood Library is recruiting a Technical Services & Digital Initiatives Librarian.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

This individual will provide leadership in areas of acquisitions and cataloging/metadata and will spearhead digitization of the Library's unique collections in order to make them available to a wider audience. The successful candidate should be a creative and service-oriented professional who will direct the daily and long-term activities of a department of six classified staff; the successful candidate's leadership should be informed by a vision for a technologically adept library that makes its collections more accessible to users in a fast-paced and rapidly changing environment.

| Digital Bibliographies | Digital Scholarship |

The Future of Taxpayer-Funded Research: Who Will Control Access to the Results?

Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Reports and White Papers on February 13th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Committee for Economic Development has released The Future of Taxpayer-Funded Research: Who Will Control Access to the Results?.

Here's an excerpt:

This report builds upon that earlier work and delves deeper into the relationship between the traditional means of providing access to federally funded scientific research and the benefits that can be derived from providing greater public access to it. As with virtually any public policy, the benefits and costs of providing public access to federally funded research fall unevenly on different members of society. We find, however, that because public-access policies that make research more open result in accelerated progress in science and faster economic growth, the net societal benefits far outweigh their limited costs.

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

Current News: Twitter Updates for 2/12/12

Posted in Current News: DigitalKoans Twitter Updates on February 12th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

| Digital Scholarship |

Web and Content Developer at Auraria Library

Posted in Library IT Jobs on February 12th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Auraria Library is recruiting a Web and Content Developer.

Here's an excerpt from the ad (job posting no.: 815796):

The Auraria Library, serving the University of Colorado Denver, Downtown Denver Campus; Metropolitan State College of Denver; and the Community College of Denver, seeks a dynamic, energetic, and innovative individual to serve as the Web and Content Developer. . . .

The incumbent will work closely with the Web Programmer and others throughout the library to make the web site more visually appealing and develop a content management plan to develop high quality content for the site. The incumbent is responsible for creating website templates and layouts, producing graphic elements, and web development and maintenance. The incumbent will lead accessibility, usability and quality assurance activities in relation to the library's online interfaces and write and develop web policies.

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, Version 80 | Digital Scholarship |

Data-Intensive Research: Community Capability Model Framework (Consultation Draft)

Posted in Cyberinfrastructure/E-Science, Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Reports and White Papers on February 12th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Community Capability Model for Data-Intensive Research project has released a consultation draft of the Community Capability Model Framework.

Here's an excerpt:

The Community Capability Model Framework is a tool developed by UKOLN, University of Bath, and Microsoft Research to assist institutions, research funders and researchers in growing the capability of their communities to perform data-­-intensive research by

  • profiling the current readiness or capability of the community,
  • indicating priority areas for change and investment, and
  • developing roadmaps for achieving a target state of readiness.

The Framework is comprised of eight capability factors representing human, technical and environmental issues. Within each factor are a series of community characteristics that are relevant for determining the capability or readiness of that community to perform data- intensive research.

| E-science and Academic Libraries Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

Applications Programmer Analyst at Georgetown University Library

Posted in Digital Library Jobs, Library IT Jobs on February 12th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Georgetown University Library is recruiting an Applications Programmer Analyst.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The Applications Programmer Analyst participates in the planning, design, implementation and maintenance of the library’s core digital and library applications, including the Integrated Library System, Distributed Digital Library Projects, DigitalGeorgetown and library contents platforms.

| Digital Bibliographies | Digital Scholarship |

Call to Action: Support the Federal Research Public Access Act (H.R. 4004 and S. 2096)

Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access on February 12th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Alliance for Taxpayer Access, whose numerous members include the American Library Association and the Association of College & Research Libraries, has issued a call to action for support of the Federal Research Public Access Act (H.R. 4004 and S. 2096).

Here's an excerpt:

Today (February 9, 2012), Senators Cornyn (R-TX), Wyden (D-OR), and Hutchison (R-TX) and Representatives Doyle (D-PA), Yoder (R-KS), and Clay (D-MO) introduced the Federal Research Public Access Act, a bill that would ensure free, timely, online access to the published results of research funded by eleven U.S. federal agencies.

We currently have a unique opportunity to create change. The Research Works Act, a piece of legislation introduced in December that would ban the government from providing the public access to publicly funded research, has galvanized the research community into acting against practices that restrict access to research articles—reaching the pages of the Economist, the New York Times, Wired, the Guardian, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and many other outlets. . . .

Let Congress know you support FRPAA

With reinvigorated support from the research community and attention from the mainstream media, now is the time to push for this groundbreaking legislation and let Congress know that students—and the rest of the public—deserve access to the research which they paid for and upon which their education depends. . . .

Raise awareness of and build support for FRPAA

  • Sign the ATA Petition in support of FRPAA. Click here to view signatories of the petition. . . .
  • Tweet at or post of the Facebook wall of your legislators to ask them to support and co-sponsor FRPAA; or, if they're already a sponsor, thank them for their leadership. . . .

Background. . . .

Now before both the House of Representatives and the Senate, FRPAA would require those agencies with annual extramural research budgets of $100 million or more to provide the public with online access to research manuscripts stemming from such funding no later than six months after publication in a peer-reviewed journal. The bill gives individual agencies flexibility in choosing the location of the digital repository to house this content, as long as the repositories meet conditions for interoperability and public accessibility, and have provisions for long-term archiving.

The bill specifically covers unclassified research funded by agencies including: Department of Agriculture, Department of Commerce, Department of Defense, Department of Education, Department of Energy, Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Homeland Security, Department of Transportation, Environmental Protection Agency, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the National Science Foundation.

Further information: "SPARC FAQ for University Administrators and Faculty FRPAA 2012" and "Support FRPAA Banners."

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography| Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

Current News: Twitter Updates for 2/9/12

Posted in Current News: DigitalKoans Twitter Updates on February 9th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

| Digital Scholarship |


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