Archive for the 'Creative Commons/Open Licenses' Category

"Sustainable Book Publishing as a Service at the University of Michigan"

Posted in ARL Libraries, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on August 22nd, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Jason Colman has published "Sustainable Book Publishing as a Service at the University of Michigan" in the Journal of Electronic Publishing.

Here's an excerpt:

To solve this problem [publishing open access books], Michigan Publishing Services has developed both a house service publishing imprint, Maize Books, and a white-labeled book publishing program, branded by University units, all running on the same technical and financial infrastructure. With an emphasis on Open Access with flexible Creative Commons licensing and affordable Print on Demand and EBook options combine workflow efficiencies with a menu of chargeback services to cover the costs of their production and allow staffing to be scaled to meet emerging needs.

This brief case study details Michigan Publishing Services’s program for books as it stands today, explains its approach to sustainability, and offers a few thoughts about when this model is suitable and when it is not.

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DigitalKoans Turns 12

Posted in Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Scholarship Publications, Open Access, Publishing on April 20th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The first DigitalKoans post, which was about John Willinsky's book, The Access Principle: The Case for Open Access to Research and Scholarship, was published twelve years ago today. It's been followed by 8,490 more posts. DigitalKoans has always been freely available and under versions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License. It has been completely independent, and it has not sought or accepted ads, sponsorships, or any other revenue generating activities. It has primarily focused on data/digital curation issues and open access issues, but it has also announced over 2,600 digital library and library IT jobs.

From 4/20/2005 through yesterday, DigitalKoans had over 13.4 million visitors, over 60.5 million file requests, and over 45.3 million page views. Excluding spiders, there were over 8 million visitors and over 19.8 million page views.

Digital Scholarship, a digital press, was established at the same time as DigitalKoans. In addition to DigitalKoans, it has published digital bibliographies/webliographies and digital books and book supplements under versions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License and the Creative Commons Attribution License. From 2009 to 2012, it also published low-cost or minimum cost (the lowest price that CreateSpace would accept) paperback versions of its digital books for libraries or individuals who wanted a hardcopy.

From 4/20/2005 through yesterday, Digital Scholarship had over 17.8 million visitors from 234 of the 240 Internet country domains, over 85.3 million file requests, and over 62.8 million page views. Excluding spiders, there were over 10.7 million visitors from 234 Internet country domains, over 49.2 million file requests, and over 28 million page views.

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"Copyright: The Immoveable Barrier That Open Access Advocates Underestimated"

Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 21st, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Richard Poynder has published "Copyright: The Immoveable Barrier That Open Access Advocates Underestimated."

Here's an excerpt:

In calling for research papers to be made freely available open access advocates promised that doing so would lead to a simpler, less costly, more democratic, and more effective scholarly communication system. To achieve their objectives they proposed two different ways of providing open access: green OA (self-archiving) and gold OA (open access publishing). However, while the OA movement has succeeded in persuading research institutions and funders of the merits of open access, it has failed to win the hearts and minds of most researchers. More importantly, it is not achieving its objectives. There are various reasons for this, but above all it is because OA advocates underestimated the extent to which copyright would subvert their cause.

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Creative Commons Releases CC Search Beta

Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Google and Other Search Engines, Open Access on February 8th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Creative Commons has released CC Search Beta.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Our goal is to cover the whole commons, but we wanted to develop something people could test and react to that would be useful at launch. To build our beta, we settled on a goal to represent one percent of the known Commons, or about 10 million works, and we chose a vertical slice of images only, to fully explore a purpose-built interface that represented one type but many providers. . . .

After a detailed review of potential sources, the available APIs, and the quality of their datasets, we selected the Rijksmuseum, Flickr, 500px, the New York Public Library as our initial sources. Later, after discussions with the Metropolitan Museum of Art regarding their collection of public domain works, which were released under CC0 on February 7, 2017, we incorporated their 200,000 CC0 images as well. . . .

The prototype of this tool focuses on photos as its first media and uses open APIs in order to index the available works. The search filters allow users to search by license type, title, creator, tags, collection, and type of institution.

CC Search Beta also provides social features, allowing users to create and share lists as well as add tags and favorites to the objects in the commons, and save their searches. Finally, it incorporates one-click attribution, giving users pre-formatted copy for easy attribution.

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Metropolitan Museum of Art Puts Images of Public Domain Artworks under Creative Commons Zero (CC0) License

Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Museums, Open Access on February 8th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has put images of public domain artworks under the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) License.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

This morning, we announced a major update to the Museum's policy governing the use and reuse of images in our collection: all images of public-domain artworks in the Museum's collection are now available for free and unrestricted use under Creative Commons Zero (CC0). This updated policy, known as Open Access, enables everyone to utilize more than 375,000 images of public-domain artworks in The Met's collection in any media without permission or fee.

See also: "Introducing Open Access at The Met."

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"Write up! A Study of Copyright Information on Library-Published Journals"

Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on July 20th, 2016 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Melanie Schlosser has published "Write up! A Study of Copyright Information on Library-Published Journals" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

INTRODUCTION Libraries have a mission to educate users about copyright, and library publishing staff are often involved in that work. This article investigates a concrete point of intersection between the two areas—copyright statements on library-published journals. METHODS Journals published by members of the Library Publishing Coalition were examined for open access status, type and placement of copyright information, copyright ownership, and open licensing. RESULTS Journals in the sample were overwhelmingly (93%) open access. 80% presented copyright information of some kind, but only 30% of those included it at both the journal and the article level. Open licensing was present in 38% of the journals, and the most common ownership scenario was the author retaining copyright while granting a nonexclusive license to the journal or publisher. 9% of the sample journals included two or more conflicting rights statements. DISCUSSION 76% of the journals did not consistently provide accurate, easily-accessible rights information, and numerous problems were found with the use of open licensing, including conflicting licenses, incomplete licenses, and licenses not appearing at the article level. CONCLUSION Recommendations include presenting full copyright and licensing information at both the journal and the article level, careful use of open licenses, and publicly-available author agreements. External Data or Supplements:

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"The Mystery of Creative Commons Licenses"

Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 29th, 2016 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

De Gruyter Open has released "The Mystery of Creative Commons Licenses" by Witold Kieńć.

Here's an excerpt:

While more than half of open access papers are published under the terms of a liberal Creative Commons Attribution Licence, the majority of authors of open access works seem not to accept the terms of either this or any other Creative Commons license.

Despite the fact that the majority of journals indexed in the Directory of Open Access Journals use liberal Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence as a default, and that probably more than half of all articles published in open access serials are published under the terms of this licence, academic authors seem not to support liberal licensing. How is it possible? Are authors of more than 600 thousand CC-BY licensed works invisible in surveys? Or do they publish under the terms of this license against their will?

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DPLA, Creative Commons, Europeana, and Partners Launch RightsStatements.org

Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses on April 15th, 2016 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Digital Public Library of America, the Creative Commons, Europeana, and other partners have launched RightsStatements.org .

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

In May 2015, the International Rights Statements Working Group released two white papers with our recommendations for establishing standardized rights statements for describing copyright and reuse status of digital cultural heritage materials, and the enabling technical infrastructure for those statements. After working for nearly a year to implement the recommendations of the white papers, the Digital Public Library of America and Europeana are proud to announce the launch of RightsStatements.org.

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Creative Commons Integration, from A to Z

Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses on March 25th, 2016 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Creative Commons has released Creative Commons Integration, from A to Z.

Here's an excerpt:

What: This toolkit covers the elements for a basic Creative Commons platform integration, including aligning legal terms to CC tools; installing the CC license chooser; displaying CC licensed content with the correct logos and links; and how to communicate CC to your users.

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"Creative Commons Licenses: Empowering Open Access"

Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing on March 14th, 2016 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Thomas Margoni and Diane M. Peters have self-archived "Creative Commons Licenses: Empowering Open Access."

Here's an excerpt:

Open access (OA) is a concept that in recent years has acquired popularity and widespread recognition. International statements and scholarly analysis converge on the following main characteristics of open access: free availability on the public Internet, permission for any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, and link to the full texts of these articles, crawl them for indexing, pass them as data to software, and use them for any other lawful purpose, without financial, legal, or technical barriers other than those inseparable from gaining access to the Internet itself. The only legal constraint on reproduction and distribution, and the only role for copyright in this domain, should be to give authors control over the integrity of their work and the right to be properly acknowledged and cited.

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Requirements for the Technical Infrastructure for Standardized International Rights Statements

Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Reports and White Papers on October 8th, 2015 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

International Rights Statements Working Group has released Requirements for the Technical Infrastructure for Standardized International Rights Statements.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Over the past fifteen months, representatives from the Europeana and DPLA networks, in partnership with Creative Commons, have been developing a collaborative approach to internationally interoperable rights statements that can be used to communicate the copyright status of cultural objects published via the DPLA and Europeana platforms.

The purpose of these rights statements is to provide end users of our platforms with easy to understand information on what they can and cannot do with digital items that they encounter via these platforms. Having standardized interoperable rights statements will also make it easier for application developers and other third parties to automatically identify items that can be re-used.

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Creative Commons Gets $450,000 Arcadia Fund Grant to support Open Access Publishing

Posted in Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access on September 28th, 2015 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Creative Commons has received a $450,000 grant from the Arcadia Fund support open access publishing.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Creative Commons will use funds from Arcadia to develop tools that complement the current CC license suite and empower authors to retain or regain their right to publish so they can make their scholarly and academic works available for public use.

Building on the success of the current CC licenses—now with nearly 1 billion licenses in use across over 9 million websites—Creative Commons is enthusiastic about developing tools that can be used by authors who "write to be read" but face all too common barriers to making their research openly available. These resources will be developed for global use, taking into account country-specific copyright laws, customs, and language. Once in widespread use, these tools are expected to increase the number of articles and publications that are available for broad public use. . . .

Collaborators on this project include Authors Alliance, Free Culture Trust, and SPARC, all of whom are dedicated to supporting authors, institutions, and the public in promoting access to research and scholarly work.

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