Archive for the 'Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management' Category

Best Practices for Citability of Data and Evolving Roles in Scholarly Communication

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Reports and White Papers on August 20th, 2012

Opportunities for Data Exchange has released Best Practices for Citability of Data and Evolving Roles in Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

This report sets out the current thinking on data citation best practice and presents the results of a survey of librarians asking how new support roles could and should be developed. The findings presented here build on the extensive desk research carried out for the report "Integration of Data and Publication" (Reilly, Schallier, Schrimpf, Smit, & Wilkinson, Sept 2011), which identified that data citation was an area of opportunity for both researchers and libraries. That report also recounted the findings of a workshop held at the LIBER 2011 Conference in Barcelona. . . .This previous work is supported here with further information gathered through extensive desk research, structured interviews and an online survey of LIBER members to explore best practice in data citation and evolving support roles for libraries.

| Research Data Curation Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

Be Sociable, Share!

    Sharing Research Data: Compilation of Results on Drivers and Barriers and New Opportunities

    Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Reports and White Papers on August 20th, 2012

    Opportunities for Data Exchange has released Compilation of Results on Drivers and Barriers and New Opportunities.

    Here's an excerpt:

    Opportunities for Data Exchange (ODE) is a FP7 Project carried out by members of the Alliance for Permanent Access (APA), which is gathering evidence to support strategic investment in the emerging e-Infrastructure for data sharing, re-use and preservation. The ODE Conceptual Model has been developed within the Project to characterise the process of data sharing and the factors which give rise to variations in data sharing for different parties involved. Within the overall Conceptual Model there can be identified models of process, of context, and of drivers, barriers and enablers. The Conceptual Model has been evolved on the basis of existing knowledge and expertise, and draws on research conducted both outside of the ODE Project and in earlier stages of the Project itself (Sections 1-2).

    | Research Data Curation Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

    Be Sociable, Share!

      "De-Mystifying the Data Management Requirements of Research Funders"

      Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Grants on August 14th, 2012

      Dianne Dietrich, Trisha Adamus, Alison Miner, and Gail Steinhart have published "De-Mystifying the Data Management Requirements of Research Funders" in the latest issue of Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship.

      Here's an excerpt:

      Research libraries have sought to apply their information management expertise to the management of digital research data. This focus has been spurred in part by the policies of two major funding agencies in the United States, which require grant recipients make research outputs, including publications and research data, openly available. As many academic libraries are beginning to offer or are already offering assistance in writing and implementing data management plans, it is important to consider how best to support researchers. Our research examined the current data management requirements of major US funding agencies to better understand data management requirements facing researchers and the implications for libraries offering data management services for researchers.

      | Research Data Curation Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

      Be Sociable, Share!

        Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies Offers Certificate of Advanced Study in Data Science

        Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Information Schools on August 12th, 2012

        Syracuse University's School of Information Studies is offering a Certificate of Advanced Study in Data Science.

        Here's an excerpt from the program web page:

        Data scientists collect, organize, store, analyze and share big data. In other words, they know where data lives and can find it. They keep it in an accessible format ready for query. They look at data and see patterns and trends. Most importantly, they share what they find with partners, collaborators and, in many cases, the world.

        The iSchool is helping lead the dialogue in defining data science within the academic community and within industry. In doing so, students in this CAS program have the rare opportunity to place their fingerprint on the first wave of standards. This will help institutions and affiliates clarify the murky definitions of data science as it infiltrates public consciousness over the next five to ten years. Professionals with this CAS are particularly poised to lead this field. Our students gain hard, technical skills but also possess the soft, theoretical skills that organizations desperately need.

        | Digital Curation Bibliography: Preservation and Stewardship of Scholarly Works | Digital Scholarship |

        Be Sociable, Share!

          Digital Curation Resource Guide

          Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Scholarship Publications, Scholarly Communication on August 12th, 2012

          Digital Scholarship has released the Digital Curation Resource Guide.

          This resource guide presents over 200 selected English-language websites and documents that are useful in understanding and conducting digital curation. It covers academic programs, discussion lists and groups, glossaries, file formats and guidelines, metadata standards and vocabularies, models, organizations, policies, research data management, serials and blogs, services and vendor software, software and tools, and training. It is available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.

          The Digital Curation Resource Guide complements the Digital Curation Bibliography: Preservation and Stewardship of Scholarly Works, which was released in June.

          It is also available as an EPUB file (see How to Read EPUB Files).

          Be Sociable, Share!

            The Future of Big Data

            Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Reports and White Papers on July 22nd, 2012

            The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released The Future of Big Data.

            Here's an excerpt:

            Imagine where we might be in 2020. The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project and Elon University's Imagining the Internet Center asked digital stakeholders to weigh two scenarios for 2020, select the one most likely to evolve, and elaborate on the choice. One sketched out a relatively positive future where Big Data are drawn together in ways that will improve social, political, and economic intelligence. The other expressed the view that Big Data could cause more problems than it solves between now and 2020.

            Respondents to our query rendered a decidedly split verdict.

            | Digital Curation Bibliography: Preservation and Stewardship of Scholarly Works | Digital Scholarship |

            Be Sociable, Share!

              The Journal of Heredity Joins Growing Number of Journals Mandating Data Archiving

              Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 19th, 2012

              The American Genetic Association has mandated the Joint Data Archiving Policy for the Journal of Heredity. The Joint Data Archiving Policy (JDAP) page lists other journals that mandate data archiving.

              | Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

              Be Sociable, Share!

                Managing Research Data in Big Science

                Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Reports and White Papers on July 18th, 2012

                Norman Gray, Tobia Carozzi, and Graham Woan have self-archived Managing Research Data in Big Science in arXiv.org.

                Here's an excerpt:

                The project which led to this report was funded by JISC in 2010-2011 as part of its 'Managing Research Data' programme, to examine the way in which Big Science data is managed, and produce any recommendations which may be appropriate. . . .

                This project has explored these differences using as a case-study Gravitational Wave data generated by the LSC [LIGO Scientific Collaboration], and has produced recommendations intended to be useful variously to JISC, the funding council (STFC) and the LSC community.

                In Sect. 1 we define what we mean by 'big science', describe the overall data culture there, laying stress on how it necessarily or contingently differs from other disciplines.

                In Sect. 2 we discuss the benefits of a formal data-preservation strategy, and the cases for open data and for well-preserved data that follow from that. . . .

                In Sect. 3 we briefly discuss the LIGO data management plan, and pull together whatever information is available on the estimation of digital preservation costs.

                | Digital Curation Bibliography: Preservation and Stewardship of Scholarly Works | Digital Scholarship |

                Be Sociable, Share!

                  After UK’s RCUK Policy, European Commission Announces Another Major Open Access Policy

                  Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 17th, 2012

                  Yesterday DigitalKoans reported on the Research Councils UK's new open access policy. Today, the European Commission has announced another major open access policy.

                  Here's an excerpt from the press release:

                  The European Commission today outlined measures to improve access to scientific information produced in Europe. Broader and more rapid access to scientific papers and data will make it easier for researchers and businesses to build on the findings of public-funded research. This will boost Europe's innovation capacity and give citizens quicker access to the benefits of scientific discoveries. In this way, it will give Europe a better return on its €87 billion annual investment in R&D. The measures complement the Commission's Communication to achieve a European Research Area (ERA), also adopted today.

                  As a first step, the Commission will make open access to scientific publications a general principle of Horizon 2020, the EU's Research & Innovation funding programme for 2014-2020. As of 2014, all articles produced with funding from Horizon 2020 will have to be accessible:

                  • articles will either immediately be made accessible online by the publisher ('Gold' open access)—up-front publication costs can be eligible for reimbursement by the European Commission; or
                  • researchers will make their articles available through an open access repository no later than six months (12 months for articles in the fields of social sciences and humanities) after publication ('Green' open access).

                  The Commission has also recommended that Member States take a similar approach to the results of research funded under their own domestic programmes. The goal is for 60% of European publicly-funded research articles to be available under open access by 2016.

                  The Commission will also start experimenting with open access to the data collected during publicly funded research (e.g. the numerical results of experiments), taking into account legitimate concerns related to the fundee's commercial interests or to privacy.

                  | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

                  Be Sociable, Share!

                    "Government Response to the Finch Group Report: ‘Accessibility, Sustainability, Excellence: How to Expand Access to Research Publications’"

                    Posted in Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 16th, 2012

                    David Willetts, the UK Minister for Science and Universities, has issued "Government Response to the Finch Group Report: 'Accessibility, Sustainability, Excellence: How to Expand Access to Research Publications'."

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    The Government has listened carefully to what publishers, learned societies and the Finch Group collectively have had to say on this issue. We prefer the 'gold' over the 'green' model, especially where the research is taxpayer funded so the Government agrees with the sentiment expressed in the Finch Report. Embargo periods allowed by funding bodies for publishers should be short where publishers have chosen not to take up the preferred option of their receiving an Article Processing Charge (which provides payment in full for immediate publication by the 'gold OA' route). Where APC funds are not available to the publisher or learned society, for the publication of publicly-funded research, then publishers could reasonably insist on a longer more equitable embargo period. This could be up to 12 months for science, technology and engineering publications and longer for publications in those disciplines which require more time to secure payback. Even so, publications with embargo periods longer than two years may find it difficult to argue that they are also serving the public interest.

                    | Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals | Digital Scholarship |

                    Be Sociable, Share!

                      Research Councils UK Adopts New Open Access Policy

                      Posted in Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 16th, 2012

                      The Research Councils UK has adopted a new open access policy.

                      Here's an excerpt from the press release:

                      Research Councils UK (RCUK) has today, 16th July 2012, unveiled its new Open Access policy. Informed by the work of the National Working Group on Expanding Access to Published Research Findings, chaired by Professor Dame Janet Finch, the policy at once harmonises and makes significant changes to existing Research Councils' Open Access policies. . . .

                      The new policy, which will apply to all qualifying publications being submitted for publication from 1 April 2013, states that peer reviewed research papers which result from research that is wholly or partially funded by the Research Councils:

                      • must be published in journals which are compliant with Research Council policy on Open Access, and;
                      • must include details of the funding that supported the research, and a statement on how the underlying research materials such as data, samples or models can be accessed.

                      Criteria which journals must fulfill to be compliant with the Research Councils' Open Access policy are detailed within the policy, but include offering a 'pay to publish'; option or allowing deposit in a subject or institutional repository after a mandated maximum embargo period. In addition, the policy mandates use of 'CC-BY', the Creative Commons 'Attribution' license, when an APC is levied. The CC_BY licence allows others to modify, build upon and/or distribute the licensed work (including for commercial purposes) as long as the original author is credited.

                      The Research Councils will provide block grants to eligible UK Higher Education Institutions, approved independent research organisations and Research Council Institutes to support payment of the Article Processing Charges (APCs) associated with 'pay-to-publish'. In parallel, eligible organisations will be expected to set-up and manage their own publication funds. The Research Councils will work with eligible organisations to discuss the detail of the new approach to funding APCs and to ensure that appropriate and auditable mechanisms are put in place to manage the funds.

                      Along with HEFCE and other relevant Funding Bodies, we shall monitor these policies actively, both to review their effects and to ensure that our joint objectives on Open Access are being met.

                      | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

                      Be Sociable, Share!

                        "A Study of Faculty Data Curation Behaviors and Attitudes at a Teaching-Centered University"

                        Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on July 15th, 2012

                        Jeanine Marie Scaramozzino, Marisa L. Ramírez, and Karen J. McGaughey have published "A Study of Faculty Data Curation Behaviors and Attitudes at a Teaching-Centered University" in the latest issue of College & Research Libraries.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        This paper describes information gathered from a survey distributed to the College of Science and Mathematics faculty at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (Cal Poly), a master's-granting, teaching-centered institution. There was a more than 60 percent response rate to the survey. The survey results provided insight into the science researchers' data curation awareness, behaviors, and attitudes, as well as what needs they exhibited for services and education regarding maintenance and management of data. It is important that professional librarians understand what researchers both inside and outside their own institutions know so that they can collaborate with their university colleagues to examine data curation needs.

                        | Digital Curation Bibliography: Preservation and Stewardship of Scholarly Works | Digital Scholarship |

                        Be Sociable, Share!

                          Page 16 of 29« First...10...1415161718...Last »

                          DigitalKoans

                          DigitalKoans

                          Digital Scholarship

                          Copyright © 2005-2015 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

                          Creative Commons License
                          This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license.