Archive for the 'Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management' Category

What Drives Academic Data Sharing?

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on May 2nd, 2014

RatSWD has released What Drives Academic Data Sharing?.

Here's an excerpt:

Based on a systematic review of 98 scholarly papers and an empirical survey among 603 secondary data users, we develop a conceptual framework that explains the process of data sharing from the primary researcher’s point of view. We show that this process can be divided into six descriptive categories: Data donor, research organization, research community, norms, data infrastructure, and data recipients. Drawing from our findings, we discuss theoretical implications regarding knowledge creation and dissemination as well as research policy measures to foster academic collaboration.

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"Data Publication Consensus and Controversies"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 30th, 2014

F1000Research has released an eprint of "Data Publication Consensus and Controversies."

Here's an excerpt:

As data publication venues proliferate, significant debate continues over formats, processes, and terminology. Here, we present an overview of data publication initiatives underway and the current conversation, highlighting points of consensus and issues still in contention.

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How to Discover Requirements for Research Data Management Services

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on April 9th, 2014

The DCC and DataONE have released How to Discover Requirements for Research Data Management Services.

Here's an excerpt:

This guide is meant for people whose role involves developing services or tools to support research data management (RDM) and digital curation, whether in a Higher Education Institution or a project working across institutions. Your RDM development role might be embedded with the research groups concerned, or at a more centralised level, such as a library or computing service. You will need a methodical approach to plan, elicit, analyse, document and prioritise a range of users' requirements.

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The Value and Impact of Data Sharing and Curation: A Synthesis of Three Recent Studies of UK Research Data Centres

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Repositories, Reports and White Papers on April 4th, 2014

JISC has released The Value and Impact of Data Sharing and Curation: A Synthesis of Three Recent Studies of UK Research Data Centres.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The data centre studies combined quantitative and qualitative approaches in order to quantify value in economic terms and present other, non-economic, impacts and benefits. Uniquely, the studies cover both users and depositors of data, and we believe the surveys of depositors undertaken are the first of their kind. All three studies show a similar pattern of findings, with data sharing via the data centres having a large measurable impact on research efficiency and on return on investment in the data and services. These findings are important for funders, both for making the economic case for investment in data curation and sharing and research data infrastructure, and for ensuring the sustainability of such research data centres.

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"Measuring the Value of Research Data: A Citation Analysis of Oceanographic Data Sets"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 2nd, 2014

Christopher W. Belter has published "Measuring the Value of Research Data: A Citation Analysis of Oceanographic Data Sets" in PLOS ONE.

Here's an excerpt:

Evaluation of scientific research is becoming increasingly reliant on publication-based bibliometric indicators, which may result in the devaluation of other scientific activities—such as data curation—that do not necessarily result in the production of scientific publications. This issue may undermine the movement to openly share and cite data sets in scientific publications because researchers are unlikely to devote the effort necessary to curate their research data if they are unlikely to receive credit for doing so. This analysis attempts to demonstrate the bibliometric impact of properly curated and openly accessible data sets by attempting to generate citation counts for three data sets archived at the National Oceanographic Data Center. My findings suggest that all three data sets are highly cited, with estimated citation counts in most cases higher than 99% of all the journal articles published in Oceanography during the same years. I also find that methods of citing and referring to these data sets in scientific publications are highly inconsistent, despite the fact that a formal citation format is suggested for each data set. These findings have important implications for developing a data citation format, encouraging researchers to properly curate their research data, and evaluating the bibliometric impact of individuals and institutions.

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"Response to Elsevier’s Text and Data Mining Policy: A LIBER Discussion Paper"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 31st, 2014

LIBER has released "Response to Elsevier's Text and Data Mining Policy: A LIBER Discussion Paper."

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

LIBER believes that the right to read is the right to mine and that licensing will never bridge the gap in the current copyright framework as it is unscalable and resource intensive. Furthermore, as this discussion paper highlights, licensing has the potential to limit the innovative potential of digital research methods by:

  1. restricting the tools that researchers can use
  2. limiting the way in which research results can be made available
  3. impacting on the transparency and reproducibility of research results.

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Exemplar Good Governance Structures and Data Policies

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on March 19th, 2014

APARSEN has released Exemplar Good Governance Structures and Data Policies.

Here's an excerpt:

This report summarises the level of preparedness for interoperable governance and data policies based on both desktop research on selected data policies and online survey conducted during this study. It is important to understand what current data policies address and if they miss out on important topics, such as specific requirements for data preservation. This will give an indication on the possible impact of such data policies on the individual communities and allows recommendations to be drawn up to guide forthcoming policies. This report concludes with selected recommendations that should be taken into account when drawing up data policies concerning digital preservation.

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PLOS Clarifies Open Data Policy

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 10th, 2014

PLOS has clarified its open data policy.

Here's an excerpt:

In the previous post, and also on our site for PLOS ONE Academic Editors, an attempt to simplify our policy did not represent the policy correctly and we sincerely apologize for that and for the confusion it has caused. We are today correcting that post and hoping it provides the clarity many have been seeking. . . .

Two key things to summarize about the policy are:

  1. The policy does not aim to say anything new about what data types, forms and amounts should be shared.
  2. The policy does aim to make transparent where the data can be found, and says that it shouldn't be just on the authors' own hard drive.

Correction

We have struck out the paragraph in the original PLOS ONE blog post headed "What do we mean by data", as we think it led to much of the confusion. Instead we offer this guidance to authors planning to submit to a PLOS journal.

What data do I need to make available?

We ask you to make available the data underlying the findings in the paper, which would be needed by someone wishing to understand, validate or replicate the work. Our policy has not changed in this regard. What has changed is that we now ask you to say where the data can be found.

As the PLOS data policy applies to all fields in which we publish, we recognize that we'll need to work closely with authors in some subject areas to ensure adherence to the new policy. Some fields have very well established standards and practices around data, while others are still evolving, and we would like to work with any field that is developing data standards. We are aiming to ensure transparency about data availability.

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Geospatial Data Stewardship: Key Online Resources

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Reports and White Papers on March 6th, 2014

The National Digital Stewardship Alliance has released Geospatial Data Stewardship: Key Online Resources.

Here's an excerpt:

This document lists online resources that highlight key concepts and practices supporting the preservation and stewardship of digital geospatial data and information. GIS practitioners take the initial preservation actions in the decisions they make regarding data creation and management. Librarians, archivists and museum professionals are often called on to support access and the long-term historical and temporal analysis of these same materials. The resources below offer a starting point to methods, tools and approaches across the information lifecycle to assist in understanding current best practices in the stewardship of geospatial data.

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"An Introduction to the Coverage of the Data Citation Index (Thomson-Reuters): Disciplines, Document Types and Repositories"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on March 5th, 2014

Daniel Torres-Salinas, Alberto Martín-Martín, Enrique Fuente-Gutiérrez have self-archived "An Introduction to the Coverage of the Data Citation Index (Thomson-Reuters): Disciplines, Document Types and Repositories" in arXiv.org.

Here's an excerpt:

In the past years, the movement of data sharing has been enjoying great popularity. Within this context, Thomson Reuters launched at the end of 2012 a new product inside the Web of Knowledge family: the Data Citation Index. The aim of this tool is to enable discovery and access, from a single place, to data from a variety of data repositories from different subject areas and from around the world. In this short note we present some preliminary results from the analysis of the Data Citation Index. Specifically, we address the following issues: discipline coverage, data types present in the database, and repositories that were included at the time of the study.

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PLOS Mandates Immediate Open Access to Article-Related Data

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 26th, 2014

PLOS has mandated that author's provide immediate open access to article-related data upon publication.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

In an effort to increase access to this data, we are now revising our data-sharing policy for all PLOS journals: authors must make all data publicly available, without restriction, immediately upon publication of the article. Beginning March 3rd, 2014, all authors who submit to a PLOS journal will be asked to provide a Data Availability Statement, describing where and how others can access each dataset that underlies the findings. This Data Availability Statement will be published on the first page of each article.

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Feet on the Ground: A Practical Approach to the Cloud—Nine Things to Consider When Assessing Cloud Storage

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Media on February 26th, 2014

AudioVisual Preservation Solutions, has released Feet on the Ground: A Practical Approach to the Cloud—Nine Things to Consider When Assessing Cloud Storage.

Here's an excerpt:

There is no all-in-one solution that will fulfill every archives' needs for preservation storage. Often, cloud storage services fulfill a portion of an organization's larger preservation infrastructure, providing secure back up for preservation copies or supporting delivery of access files from low-latency storage. Vetting and selection is therefore the alignment of organizational and collection needs with the offerings and functionality of a service. This means defining your acceptance criteria for optimal functionality and understanding how a service will fit in your preservation environment.

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