Archive for the 'Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management' Category

Keeping Research Data Safe 2: The Identification of Long-lived Digital Datasets for the Purposes of Cost Analysis: Project Plan

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on May 25th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Charles Beagrie has released Keeping Research Data Safe 2: The Identification of Long-lived Digital Datasets for the Purposes of Cost Analysis: Project Plan.

Here's an excerpt from the project home page:

The Keeping Research Data Safe 2 project commenced on 31 March 2009 and will complete in December 2009. The project will identify and analyse sources of long-lived data and develop longitudinal data on associated preservation costs and benefits. We believe these outcomes will be critical to developing preservation costing tools and cost benefit analyses for justifying and sustaining major investments in repositories and data curation.

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DISC-UK DataShare Project: Final Report

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Repositories, DSpace, EPrints, Fedora, Institutional Repositories on May 24th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

JISC has released DISC-UK DataShare Project: Final Report.

Here's an excerpt:

The DISC-UK DataShare Project was funded from March 2007-March 2009 as part of JISC's Repositories and Preservation programme, Repositories Enhancement strand. It was led by EDINA and Edinburgh University Data Library in partnership with the University of Oxford and the University of Southampton. The project built on the existing informal collaboration of UK data librarians and data managers who formed DISC-UK (Data Information Specialists Committee–UK).

This project has brought together the distinct communities of data support staff in universities and institutional repository managers in order to bridge gaps and exploit the expertise of both to advance the current provision of repository services for accommodating datasets, and thus to explore new pathways to assist academics at our institutions who wish to share their data over the Internet. The project's overall aim was to contribute to new models, workflows and tools for academic data sharing within a complex and dynamic information environment which includes increased emphasis on stewardship of institutional knowledge assets of all types; new technologies to enhance e- Research; new research council policies and mandates; and the growth of the Open Access / Open Data movement.

With three institutions taking part plus the London School of Economics as an associate partner, a range of exemplars have emerged from the establishment of institutional data repositories and related services. Part of the variety in the exemplars is a result of the different repository platforms used by the three project partners: DSpace (Edinburgh DataShare), ePrints (e-Prints Soton) and Fedora (Oxford University Research Archive, ORA)–all open source software. LSE took another route and is using the distributed Dataverse repository network for data, linking to publications in LSE Research Online. Also, different approaches were taken in setting up the repositories. All three institutions had an existing, well-used institutional repository, but two chose to incorporate datasets within the same system as the publications, and one (Edinburgh DataShare) was a paired repository exclusively for datasets, designed to interoperate with the publications repository (Edinburgh Research Archive). The approach took a major turn midway through the project when an apparent solution to the problem of lack of voluntary deposits arose, in the form of the advent of the Data Audit Framework. Edinburgh participated as a partner in the DAF Development project which created the methodology for the framework, and also won a bid to carry out its own DAF Implementation project. Later, the other two partners conducted their own versions of the data audit framework under the auspices of the DataShare project.

A number of scoping activities were carried about by the partners with the goal of informing repository enhancement as well as broader dissemination. These included a State-of-the-Art-Review to determine what had been learned by previous repository projects in the UK that had forayed into the data arena. This resulted in a list of benefits and barriers to deposit of datasets by researchers to inform our outreach activities. A Data Sharing Continuum diagram was developed to illustrate where the projects were aiming to fit into the curation landscape, and the range of curation steps that could be taken, from simple backup to online visualization. Later on, a specialized metadata schema was explored (Data Documentation Initiative or DDI) in terms of how it might be incorporated into repository systems, though repository development in this area was not taken up. Instead, a dataset application profile was developed based on qualified Dublin Core (dcterms). This was implemented in the Edinburgh DataShare repository and adapted by Southampton for their next release. The project wished to explore wider issues with open data and web publishing, and therefore produced two briefing papers to do with data mashups–on numeric data and geospatial data. Finally, the project staff and consultant distilled what it had learned in terms of policy development for data repositories in a training guide. A number of peer reviewed posters, papers, and articles were written by DISC-UK members about various aspects of the project during the period.

Key conclusions were that 1) Data management motivation is a better bottom-up driver for researchers than data sharing but is not sufficient to create culture change, 2) Data librarians, data managers and data scientists can help bridge communication between repository managers & researchers, and 3) IRs can improve impact of sharing data over the internet.

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Digital Preservation: PARSE.Insight Project Reports on First Year Achievements

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on May 24th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

In "Annual Review Year 1: Goals and Achievements," The PARSE.Insight (Permanent Access to the Records of Science in Europe) Project reports on its first year achievements. This post includes links to a number of longer documents, including the PARSE.Insight Deliverable D2.1 Draft Roadmap.

Here's an excerpt from the PARSE.Insight Deliverable D2.1 Draft Roadmap.

The purpose of this document is to provide an overview and initial details of a number of specific components, both technical and non-technical, which would be needed to supplement existing and already planned infrastructures for science data. The infrastructure components presented here are aimed at bridging the gaps between islands of functionality, developed for particular purposes, often by other European projects, whether separated by discipline or time. Thus the infrastructure components are intended to play a general, unifying role in science data. While developed in the context of a European wide infrastructure, there would be great advantages for these types of infrastructure components to be available much more widely.

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U.S. Federal Government Launches Data.gov

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Public Domain on May 21st, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The U.S. Federal Government has launched Data.gov.

Here's an excerpt from the home page:

The purpose of Data.gov is to increase public access to high value, machine readable datasets generated by the Executive Branch of the Federal Government. Although the initial launch of Data.gov provides a limited portion of the rich variety of Federal datasets presently available, we invite you to actively participate in shaping the future of Data.gov by suggesting additional datasets and site enhancements to provide seamless access and use of your Federal data.

Read more about it at "Data.gov Launched by Federal Government"; "Data.gov Launches to Mixed Reviews"; and "Data.gov Now Live; Looks Nice But Short on Data."

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Dryad Repository Gets $2.18 Million Grant from the National Science Foundation

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Repositories, Grants on May 10th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Dryad Repository has received a $2.18 million grant from the National Science Foundation.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

The repository, called Dryad, is designed to archive data that underlie published findings in evolutionary biology, ecology and related fields and allow scientists to access and build on each other’s findings.

The grant recipients are:

The National Evolutionary Synthesis Center and the Metadata Research Center have been developing Dryad in coordination with a large group of Journals and Societies in evolutionary biology and ecology. With the new grant, the additional team members are contributing to the development of the repository. . . .

Currently, a tremendous amount of information underlying published research findings is lost, researchers say. The lack of data sharing and preservation makes it impossible for the data to be examined or re-used by future investigators.

Dryad addresses these shortcomings and allows scientists to validate published findings, explore new analysis methodologies, repurpose data for research questions unanticipated by the original authors, integrate data across studies and look for trends through statistical meta-analysis.

"The Dryad project seeks to enable scientists to generate new knowledge using existing data," said Kathleen Smith, Ph.D., principal investigator for the grant, a biology professor at Duke and director of the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center. "The key to Dryad in our view is making data deposition a routine and easy part of the publication process."

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Digital Repositories Roadmap Review: Towards a Vision for Research and Learning in 2013

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Learning Objects on May 7th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

JISC has released Digital Repositories Roadmap Review: Towards a Vision for Research and Learning in 2013.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The review is structured into two parts. Firstly it makes a number of recommendations targeted at the JISC Executive. The review then goes on to identify a number of milestones of relevance to the wider community that might act as a measure of progress towards the wider vision of enhanced scholarly communication. Achievement of these milestones would be assisted by JISC through its community work and funding programmes. The review addresses repositories for research outputs, research data and learning materials in separate sections.

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CLARION (Chemical Laboratory Repository In/Organic Notebooks) Project Funded

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories on April 27th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

JISC has funded the CLARION (Chemical Laboratory Repository In/Organic Notebooks) project.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

So an important part of CLARION will be developing the means for working with scientists to expose their data at the appropriate time. CLARION will expand to include a variety of spectral data, both from central analytical services and from individual labs. Another key aspect of CLARION is that we shall be integrating it with a commercial electronic laboratory notebook (eLNb). We're in the process of evaluating offerings and expect to make an announcement soon. This will be a key opportunity to see how feasible it is to integrate a standard system with the needs of a departmental repository. The protocols may be harder but we'll have the experience from the crystallography band spectroscopy. An important aspect is that we are keen to develop the Open Data idea globally and we's be very interested from other groups who are doing –or thinking of doing –similar things.

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Infrastructure Planning and Data Curation: A Comparative Study of International Approaches to Enabling the Sharing of Research Data

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on April 26th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

JISC has released Infrastructure Planning and Data Curation: A Comparative Study of International Approaches to Enabling the Sharing of Research Data.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The current methods of storing research data are as diverse as the disciplines that generate them and are necessarily driven by the myriad ways in which researchers need to subsequently access and exploit the information they contain. Institutional repositories, data centres and all other methods of storing data have to exist within an infrastructure that enables researchers to access ad exploit the data, and variant models for this infrastructure can be conceptualised. Discussion of effective infrastructures for curating data is taking place a all levels, wherever research is reliant on the longterm stewardship of digital material. JISC has commissioned this study to survey the different national agendas that are addressing variant infrastructure models, to inform developments within the UK and for facilitating an internationally integrated approach to data curation.

The study of data sharing initiatives in the OECD countries confirmed the traditional perception that the policy instruments are clustered more in the upper end of the stakeholder taxonomy – i.e. at the level of national and research funding organisations whereas the services and practical tools are being developed by organisations at the lower end of the taxonomy. Despite the differences that exist between countries in terms of the models used for research funding, as well as the levels at which decisions are taken, there is agreement on the expected strata of responsibility for applying the instruments of data sharing. This supports the structure of stakeholder taxonomy used in the study.

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OECD: We Need Publishing Standards for Datasets and Data Tables

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Metadata, Standards on April 20th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

OECD has released We Need Publishing Standards for Datasets and Data Tables.

Here's an excerpt:

Datasets are a significant part of the scholarly record and are being published more and more frequently, either formally or informally. Many publishers are beginning to link to them from their journals and authors are trying to cite them in their articles. Librarians would like a way to manage them alongside other publications. In short, they need to be integrated into the scholarly information system so that authors, readers and librarians can use, find and manage them as easily as they do working papers, journal articles and books.

In this paper, OECD is proposing some standards for citing and bibliographic management of datasets and data tables. OECD is currently building a new online publishing platform which will host working papers, journals, books, tables and datasets. Due to be launched in mid-2009, this platform will use the standards proposed above. Librarians will be offered MARC 21 records for datasets, alongside records for OECD books and periodicals. Users of the platform will be invited to download citations for datasets and tables in a form compatible with popular bibliographic management systems. All the DOIs for the datasets and tables will be deposited with CrossRef, ready for other publishers to use.

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Draft Roadmap for Science Data Infrastructure

Posted in Cyberinfrastructure/E-Science, Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on April 3rd, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

PARSE.Insight has released Draft Roadmap for Science Data Infrastructure.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The draft roadmap provides an overview and initial details of a number of specific components, both technical and non-technical, which would be needed to supplement existing and already planned infrastructures for scientific data. The infra-structure components are aimed at bridging the gaps between islands of functionality, developed for particular purposes, often by other European projects. Thus the infrastructure components are intended to play a general, unifying role in scientific data. While developed in the context of a Europe-wide infrastructure, there would be great advantages for these types of infrastructure components to be available much more widely.

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Special Issue of Library Trends on Institutional Repositories

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Metadata on March 30th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The latest issue of Library Trends (57, no. 2, Fall 2008) is about institutional repositories.

Here are the articles (links are to article preprints):

  • "Introduction: Institutional Repositories: Current State and Future"
  • "Innkeeper at the Roach Motel"
  • "Institutional Repositories in the UK: The JISC Approach"
  • "Strategies for Institutional Repository Development: A Case Study of Three Evolving Initiatives"
  • "Perceptions and Experiences of Staff in the Planning and Implementation of Institutional Repositories"
  • "Institutional Repositories and Research Data Curation in a Distributed Environment"
  • "At the Watershed: Preparing for Research Data Management and Stewardship at the University of Minnesota Libraries"
  • "Case Study in Data Curation at Johns Hopkins University"
  • "Describing Scholarly Works with Dublin Core: A Functional Approach"
  • "The 'Wealth of Networks' and Institutional Repositories: MIT, DSpace, and the Future of the Scholarly Commons"
  • "Leveraging Short-term Opportunities to Address Long-term Obligations: A Perspective on Institutional Repositories and Digital Preservation Programs"
  • "Shedding Light on the Dark Data in the Long Tail of Science"
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DigitalPreservationEurope Releases Two Briefing Papers on Scientific Data Preservation

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on February 2nd, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

DigitalPreservationEurope has released two briefing papers: "Data Preservation, Reuse and (Open) Access in High-Energy Physics" and "Digital Preservation for Long-Term Environmental Monitoring."

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