Archive for the 'Digital Copyright Wars' Category

Digital Music Consumption on the Internet: Evidence from Clickstream Data

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Reports and White Papers on March 20th, 2013

The Institute for Prospective Technological Studies. has released Digital Music Consumption on the Internet: Evidence from Clickstream Data.

Here's an excerpt:

This paper analyses the behaviour of digital music consumers on the Internet. Using clickstream data on a panel of more than 16,000 European consumers, we estimate the effects of illegal downloading and legal streaming on the legal purchases of digital music. Our results suggest that Internet users do not view illegal downloading as a substitute for legal digital music. Although positive and significant, our estimated elasticities are essentially zero: a 10% increase in clicks on illegal downloading websites leads to a 0.2% increase in clicks on legal purchase websites. Online music streaming services are found to have a somewhat larger (but still small) effect on the purchases of digital sound recordings, suggesting complementarities between these two modes of music consumption. According to our results, a 10% increase in clicks on legal streaming websites leads to up to a 0.7% increase in clicks on legal digital purchase websites. We find important cross country differences in these effects.

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    Presentations from the Congressional Internet Caucus Advisory Committee’s State of the Net Conference

    Posted in Copyright, Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Copyright Wars, Digital Culture on February 14th, 2013

    The Congressional Internet Caucus Advisory Committee has released presentations from the State of the Net conference.

    Here's a description of the conference:

    Attracting over 600 attendees annually, the State of the Net Conference provides unparalleled opportunities to network and engage on key policy issues. The State of the Net Conference is the largest information technology policy conference in the U.S. and the only one with over 50 percent Congressional staff and government policymakers in attendance. The State of the Net Conference is the only tech policy conference routinely recognized for its balanced blend of academics, consumer groups, industry and government.

    Here's an example presentation: First Sale and No Resale: Could SCOTUS and the Internet Redefine Content Ownership? .

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      EFF and Public Knowlege’s Comments on Copyright Office’s Orphan Works Inquiry

      Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Mass Digitizaton, Publishing on February 7th, 2013

      The Electronic Frontier Foundation and Public Knowledge have released their comments on the Notice of Inquiry by the Copyright Office for comments regarding orphan works, Docket No. 2012-12.

      Here's an excerpt:

      A range of options, none of them exclusive, can alleviate the problems created by the prevalence of orphan works. Even in the absence of more systemic change that can stem the growing number of works whose copyright information disappears into obscurity, the application of fair use and legislative work on damages reduction (both for orphan works specifically and for good faith fair uses generally) can allow a variety of users to bring a variety of works to the public. Mass digitization projects promise to be a part of that process, and should be able to proceed in many cases under current law. However, more ambitious plans for broader, publicly available MDPs could be incentivized to serve the public interest with additional damages limitations, attended by public interest conditions. We

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        Surprise Brief by Justice Department in Georgia State University E-Reserves Case

        Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Libraries on February 4th, 2013

        The Justice Department has filed a brief in the Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al. case by for a 21-day extension in which to "to file any amicus brief in support of appellants or in support of neither party."

        Here's an excerpt from "Obama Administration Considers Joining Publishers in Fight to Stamp out Fair Use at Universities":

        In digging into this, we've heard from a few sources that it's actually the US Copyright Office that has asked the DOJ to weigh in on the side of the publishers and against the interests of public universities and students.

        Read more about it at "Publishers and Library Groups Spar in Appeal to Ruling on Electronic Course Reserves," "Unwelcome Intervention?," and "U.S. Attorneys May Weigh in On GSU E-Reserves Case."

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          "The Authors Guild v. Hathitrust: A Way Forward for Digital Access to Neglected Works in Libraries"

          Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Books, Mass Digitizaton, Publishing on January 30th, 2013

          James Aaron has self-archived "The Authors Guild v. Hathitrust: A Way Forward for Digital Access to Neglected Works in Libraries" in SSRN.

          Here's an excerpt:

          This Comment begins by describing the HathiTrust Orphan Works Project and what it renames the neglected works problem. Next, it examines the legality of the project under current copyright law, focusing mainly on fair use under section 107, and concludes that it is unclear whether the project violates copyright law. Finally it analyzes whether this result fits the policy goals of copyright, and because it does not, proposes both legislative and judicial changes to copyright law to make it clear that in the proper circumstances, nonprofit, educational uses of neglected works do not violate copyright law.

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            "Open-Sourcing the Global Academy: Aaron Swartz’s Legacy"

            Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Open Access, Publishing on January 30th, 2013

            Rebecca Gould has self-archived "Open-Sourcing the Global Academy: Aaron Swartz's Legacy" in SSRN.

            Here's an excerpt:

            This essay examines Swartz's Open Access vision, and traces the challenges he faced in carrying out his dream. Arguing that Open Access is the future of scholarship in the digital age, I outline concrete strategies for bringing Swartz's dream to fruition.

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              "SOPA, PIPA, ACTA, TPP: An Alphabet Soup of Innovation-Stifling Copyright Legislation and Agreements"

              Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars on January 21st, 2013

              Michael A. Carrier has published "SOPA, PIPA, ACTA, TPP: An Alphabet Soup of Innovation-Stifling Copyright Legislation and Agreements" in the Northwestern Journal of Technology and Intellectual Property.

              Here's an excerpt:

              In this article, I discuss the effects of four copyright proposals on innovation: the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), PROTECT IP Act (PIPA), Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), and Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP). These proposals contain provisions that would impose copyright liability in a vague and far-reaching manner that would harm innovators, dissuade venture capitalists, and ultimately stifle innovation.

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                "The U.S. Proposal for an Intellectual Property Chapter in the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement"

                Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Legislation and Government Regulation on December 12th, 2012

                Sean M. Flynn et al. have self-archived "The U.S. Proposal for an Intellectual Property Chapter in the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement" in SSRN.

                Here's an excerpt:

                Our ultimate conclusion is that the U.S. proposal, if adopted, would upset the current international framework balancing the interests of rights holders and the public. It would heighten standards of protection for rights holders well beyond that which the best available evidence or inclusive democratic processes support. It contains insufficient balancing provisions for users, consumers, and the public interest.

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