Archive for the 'Digital Curation & Digital Preservation' Category

Preservation Metadata, Second Edition

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Metadata on July 17th, 2013

The Digital Preservation Coalition and Charles Beagrie Ltd have released the second edition of Preservation Metadata.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The second edition of 'Preservation Metadata,' written by Brian Lavoie and Richard Gartner, focuses on new developments in preservation metadata, since the first edition of the report (published Sept 2005), made possible by the emergence of PREMIS as a de facto international standard.

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    "Using Data Curation Profiles to Design the Datastar Dataset Registry"

    Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on July 16th, 2013

    Sarah J. Wright, Wendy A. Kozlowski, Dianne Dietrich, Huda J. Khan, and Gail S. Steinhart have published "Using Data Curation Profiles to Design the Datastar Dataset Registry" in the latest issue of D-Lib Magazine.

    Here's an excerpt:

    The development of research data services in academic libraries is a topic of concern to many. Cornell University Library's efforts in this area include the Datastar research data registry project. In order to ensure that Datastar development decisions were driven by real user needs, we interviewed researchers and created Data Curation Profiles (DCPs). Researchers supported providing public descriptions of their datasets; attitudes toward dataset citation, provenance, versioning, and domain specific standards for metadata also helped to guide development. These findings, as well as considerations for the use of this particular method for developing research data services in libraries are discussed in detail.

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      "Foundations of Data Curation: The Pedagogy and Practice of "Purposeful Work" with Research Data"

      Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Archives and Special Collections, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on July 15th, 2013

      Carole L. Palmer, Nicholas M. Weber, Trevor Muñoz, and Allen H. Renear have punlished "Foundations of Data Curation: The Pedagogy and Practice of "Purposeful Work" with Research Data" in the latest issue of Archive Journal.

      Here's an excerpt:

      Increased interest in large-scale, publicly accessible data collections has made data curation critical to the management, preservation, and improvement of research data in the social and natural sciences, as well as the humanities. This paper explicates an approach to data curation education that integrates traditional notions of curation with principles and expertise from library, archival, and computer science. We begin by tracing the emergence of data curation as both a concept and a field of practice related to, but distinct from, both digital curation and data stewardship. This historical account, while far from definitive, considers perspectives from both the sciences and the humanities. Alongside traditional LIS and archival science practices, unique aspects of curation have informed our concept of "purposeful work" with data and, in turn, our pedagogical approach to data curation for the sciences and the humanities.

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        Walk This Way: Detailed Steps for Transferring Born-Digital Content from Media You Can Read In-house

        Posted in Digital Archives and Special Collections, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Reports and White Papers on July 11th, 2013

        OCLC Research has released Walk This Way: Detailed Steps for Transferring Born-Digital Content from Media You Can Read In-house.

        Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

        The third report, Walk This Way: Detailed Steps for Transferring Born-Digital Content from Media You Can Read In-house, collects the assembled wisdom of experienced practitioners to help those with less experience make appropriate choices in gaining control of born-digital content. It contains discrete steps with objectives, links to available tools and software, references and resources for further research and paths to engagement with the digital archives community.

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          Johns Hopkins University Offers Digital Curation Certificate Program

          Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Museums on July 10th, 2013

          Johns Hopkins University has established a Digital Curation Certificate program.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          The Johns Hopkins University Certificate in Digital Curation, offered through the online graduate program in Museum Studies, advances the education and training of museum professionals worldwide in this emerging field.

          This certificate offers a specialized curriculum that is critically needed in the museum field. It will prepare current and aspiring museum professionals to manage the growing volume and variety of digital data of long-term value that museums are now producing, acquiring, storing and sharing with researchers, educators and the public. It will train students to work with digital collections, exhibitions, and research data that will ensure the longevity of our global cultural heritage of which museums are the stewards.

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            "The .txtual Condition: Digital Humanities, Born-Digital Archives, and the Future Literary"

            Posted in Digital Archives and Special Collections, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Humanities on July 9th, 2013

            Matthew Kirschenbaum has published "The .txtual Condition: Digital Humanities, Born-Digital Archives, and the Future Literary" in a preview issue of Digital Humanities Quarterly.

            Here's an excerpt:

            Here then are some specifics I have considered as to how digital humanities might usefully collaborate with those archivists even now working on born-digital collections:

            • Digital archivists need digital humanities researchers and subject experts to use born-digital collections. Nothing is more important. If humanities researchers don't demand access to born-digital materials then it will be harder to get those materials processed in a timely fashion, and we know that with the born-digital every day counts.
            • Digital humanists need the long-term perspective on data that archivists have. Today's digital humanities projects are, after all, the repository objects of tomorrow's born-digital archives. Funders are increasingly (and rightfully) insistent about the need to have a robust data management and sustainability plan built into project proposals from the outset. Therefore, there is much opportunity for collaboration and team-building around not only archiving and preservation, but the complete data curation cycle. This extends to the need to jointly plan around storage and institutional infrastructure.
            • Digital archivists and digital humanists need common and interoperable digital tools. Open source community-driven development at the intersection of the needs of digital archivists, humanities scholars, and even collections' donors should become an urgent priority.

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              "Unintended Consequences: New Materialist Perspectives on Library Technologies and the Digital Record"

              Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Electronic Resources, Libraries, Licenses, Publishing, Scholarly Communication on July 8th, 2013

              portal: Libraries and the Academy has released an e-print of "Unintended Consequences: New Materialist Perspectives on Library Technologies and the Digital Record" by Marlene Manoff.

              Here's an excerpt:

              Digital technology has irrevocably altered the nature of the archive. Drawing on materialist critiques and the evolving field of media archaeology, this essay explores new strategies for understanding the implications of computer networks in libraries. Although a significant portion of the contemporary literature within Library and Information Science (LIS) addresses issues of technological change, the materialist and multidisciplinary approaches proposed here provide a theoretical basis for investigating the current state of library technologies in new ways. These methods provide insight into the proliferation of digital products and the cycles of platform adoption and replacement that have marked the past decades of library development. They also help to reframe questions about content aggregation and the licensing of digital scholarship.

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                "Data Management in Scholarly Journals and Possible Roles for Libraries—Some Insights from EDaWaX"

                Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 24th, 2013

                Sven Vlaeminck has published "Data Management in Scholarly Journals and Possible Roles for Libraries—Some Insights from EDaWaX" in the latest issue of LIBER Quarterly.

                Here's an excerpt:

                In this paper we summarize the findings of an empirical study conducted by the EDaWaX-Project. 141 economics journals were examined regarding the quality and extent of data availability policies that should support replications of published empirical results in economics. This paper suggests criteria for such policies that aim to facilitate replications. These criteria were also used for analysing the data availability policies we found in our sample and to identify best practices for data policies of scholarly journals in economics. In addition, we also evaluated the journals' data archives and checked the percentage of articles associated with research data. To conclude, an appraisal as to how scientific libraries might support the linkage of publications to underlying research data in cooperation with researchers, editors, publishers and data centres is presented.

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