Archive for the 'Digital Curation & Digital Preservation' Category

PLOS: Response to NIH RFI—Strategies for NIH Data Management, Sharing, and Citation

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing on January 31st, 2017

PLOS has released Response to NIH RFI—Strategies for NIH Data Management, Sharing, and Citation.

Here's an excerpt:

We write to express the views of the Public Library of Science, a fully Open Access Publisher of seven Research Journals, in response to your RFI on Data Sharing, Management, and Citation. Open access to Research Articles is just the first step in what we consider should be the end state for all publicly funded research, and we support broader efforts towards open science. We are developing our own policies to help establish a new norm in which upon publication of a journal article, if not before, all of the underlying data (where ethically appropriate) is openly available to access and reuse without restriction according to the FAIR principles for data management to make data Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Re-usable.

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"A Metadata-Driven Approach to Data Repository Design"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Repositories, Metadata on January 30th, 2017

Matthew J. Harvey, Andrew McLean, and Henry S. Rzep have published "A Metadata-Driven Approach to Data Repository Design" in the Journal of Cheminformatics.

Here's an excerpt:

The design and use of a metadata-driven data repository for research data management is described. Metadata is collected automatically during the submission process whenever possible and is registered with DataCite in accordance with their current metadata schema, in exchange for a persistent digital object identifier. Two examples of data preview are illustrated, including the demonstration of a method for integration with commercial software that confers rich domain-specific data analytics without introducing customisation into the repository itself.

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"Preserving Transactional Data"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on January 27th, 2017

Sara Day Thomson has published "Preserving Transactional Data" in The International Journal of Digital Curation.

Here's an excerpt:

This paper discusses requirements for preserving transactional data and the accompanying challenges facing the companies and institutions who aim to re-use these data for analysis or research. It presents a range of use cases—examples of transactional data—in order to describe the characteristics and difficulties of these 'big' data for long-term access. Based on the overarching trends discerned in these use cases, the paper will define the challenges facing the preservation of these data early in the curation lifecycle. It will point to potential solutions within current legal and ethical frameworks, but will focus on positioning the problem of re-using these data from a preservation perspective.

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Version 7 of the Research Data Curation Bibliography Released

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Scholarship Publications on January 24th, 2017

Digital Scholarship has released Version 7 of the Research Data Curation Bibliography. This selective bibliography includes over 620 English-language articles, books, and technical reports that are useful in understanding the curation of digital research data in academic and other research institutions.

The Research Data Curation Bibliography covers topics such as research data creation, acquisition, metadata, provenance, repositories, management, policies, support services, funding agency requirements, peer review, publication, citation, sharing, reuse, and preservation.

Most sources have been published from January 2009 through December 2016; however, a limited number of earlier key sources are also included. The bibliography includes links to freely available versions of included works. If such versions are unavailable, links to the publishers' descriptions are provided.

Abstracts are included in this bibliography if a work is under a Creative Commons Attribution License (BY and national/international variations), a Creative Commons public domain dedication (CC0), or a Creative Commons Public Domain Mark and this is clearly indicated in the work.

The Research Data Curation Bibliography is under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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"Piracy, Public Access, and Preservation: An Exploration of Sustainable Accessibility in a Public Torrent Index"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on December 14th, 2016

John Martin has self-archived "Piracy, Public Access, and Preservation: An Exploration of Sustainable Accessibility in a Public Torrent Index."

Here's an excerpt:

Using a snapshot of torrents on the site, this study considers the potential for torrent networks to preserve and provide access to cultural materials in the form of digital media content. Metadata from 2.1 million torrents were categorized by media type and the robustness of given torrents was assessed. Trends over time, such as number of uploads and volume, were also investigated. This study found that relatively few torrents exhibit long-term survivability, even though the overall volume in the index shows continuous increase.

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"Scholarly Context Adrift: Three out of Four URI References Lead to Changed Content"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on December 9th, 2016

Shawn M. Jones et al. have published "Scholarly Context Adrift: Three out of Four URI References Lead to Changed Content" in PLOS ONE.

Here's an excerpt:

Increasingly, scholarly articles contain URI references to "web at large" resources including project web sites, scholarly wikis, ontologies, online debates, presentations, blogs, and videos. Authors reference such resources to provide essential context for the research they report on. A reader who visits a web at large resource by following a URI reference in an article, some time after its publication, is led to believe that the resource's content is representative of what the author originally referenced. However, due to the dynamic nature of the web, that may very well not be the case. We reuse a dataset from a previous study in which several authors of this paper were involved, and investigate to what extent the textual content of web at large resources referenced in a vast collection of Science, Technology, and Medicine (STM) articles published between 1997 and 2012 has remained stable since the publication of the referencing article. We do so in a two-step approach that relies on various well-established similarity measures to compare textual content. In a first step, we use 19 web archives to find snapshots of referenced web at large resources that have textual content that is representative of the state of the resource around the time of publication of the referencing paper. We find that representative snapshots exist for about 30% of all URI references. In a second step, we compare the textual content of representative snapshots with that of their live web counterparts. We find that for over 75% of references the content has drifted away from what it was when referenced. These results raise significant concerns regarding the long term integrity of the web-based scholarly record and call for the deployment of techniques to combat these problems.

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iPRES 2016: 13th International Conference on Digital Preservation Proceedings

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on December 6th, 2016

The iPRES 2016: 13th International Conference on Digital Preservation Proceedings is available as a 169-page PDF.

Here's an excerpt:

In keeping with previous years, the iPRES 2016 programme is organised into research and practice streams. This format ensures visibility and promotion of both academic research work and the projects and initiatives of institutions involved in digital preservation practices. Furthermore, work- shops and tutorials provide opportunities for participants to share information, knowledge and best practices, and explore opportunities for collaboration on new approaches.

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"Current Status of Scientific Data Curation Research and Practices in Mainland China"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on December 6th, 2016

Shiyan Ou and Yu Zhou have published "Current Status of Scientific Data Curation Research and Practices in Mainland China" in LIBRES.

Here's an excerpt:

With the rapid growth in the body of scientific data, scientific research depends more and more on finding theories and knowledge from the data, and thus data-intensive scientific discovery has become the fourth paradigm of scientific research. Therefore, it is urgent to develop and adopt methods to support the collection, collation, preservation and utilization of scientific data. This paper provides an overview of scientific data curation research and practices in mainland China. Firstly, it reviews Chinese research articles on data curation and outlines the research status and progress in this area. Secondly, it surveys existing scientific data repositories or platforms in mainland China, and analyzes the gaps between China's and other countries' data curation practices.

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"The Digitized Archival Document Trustworthiness Scale"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on November 29th, 2016

Devan Ray Donaldson has published "The Digitized Archival Document Trustworthiness Scale" in the International Journal of Digital Curation.

Here's an excerpt:

Designated communities are central to validation of preservation. If a designated community is able to understand and use information found within a digital repository, the assumption is that the information has been properly preserved. As judging the trustworthiness of information requires at least some level of understanding of that information, this paper presents results of a study aimed at developing a tool for measuring designated community members' perceptions of trustworthiness for preserved information found within a digital repository. The study focuses on genealogists at the Washington State Digital Archives who routinely interact with digitized genealogical records, including digitized marriage, death, and birth records. Results of the study include construction of an original Digitized Archival Document Trustworthiness Scale (DADTS). DADTS is a ready-made tool for digital curators to use to measure the trustworthiness perceptions of their designated community members. Implications of this study include the feasibility of engaging members of a designated community in the construction of a scale for measuring trustworthiness perception, thereby providing deeper insight into the understandability and usability of preserved information by that designated community.

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Two Reports on Disk Image Formats from the Harvard Library Digital Preservation Program

Posted in ARL Libraries, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Research Libraries on November 4th, 2016

The Harvard Library Digital Preservation Program has released Disk Image Content Model and Metadata Analysis ACTIVITY 1: Comparative Format Matrix Analysis and Disk Image Content Model and Metadata Analysis ACTIVITY 2: Metadata Analysis

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Harvard Library collections include a variety of computer media that will be imaged using forensic disk imaging techniques and preserved in the Library's preservation and access repository—the Digital Repository Service (DRS). As a first step towards providing support for this material in the DRS, the Library contracted AVPreserve in late 2015 to assist with the analysis. The goals of the analysis were:

  • Recommended disk image formats to accept and prefer for the DRS
  • Recommended technical metadata schema(s) to use for disk image file formats
  • DRS content models for these objects
  • Recommendations for enhancing Harvard Library's FITS tool to better support these objects

See also: Disk Image Format Matrix spreadsheet.

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"The Durability and Fragility of Knowledge Infrastructures: Lessons Learned from Astronomy"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Open Science on November 3rd, 2016

Christine L. Borgman, Peter T. Darch, Ashley E. Sands, and Milena S. Golshan have self-archived "The Durability and Fragility of Knowledge Infrastructures: Lessons Learned from Astronomy."

Here's an excerpt:

Infrastructures are not inherently durable or fragile, yet all are fragile over the long term. Durability requires care and maintenance of individual components and the links between them. Astronomy is an ideal domain in which to study knowledge infrastructures, due to its long history, transparency, and accumulation of observational data over a period of centuries. Research reported here draws upon a long-term study of scientific data practices to ask questions about the durability and fragility of infrastructures for data in astronomy. Methods include interviews, ethnography, and document analysis. As astronomy has become a digital science, the community has invested in shared instruments, data standards, digital archives, metadata and discovery services, and other relatively durable infrastructure components. Several features of data practices in astronomy contribute to the fragility of that infrastructure. These include different archiving practices between ground- and space-based missions, between sky surveys and investigator-led projects, and between observational and simulated data. Infrastructure components are tightly coupled, based on international agreements. However, the durability of these infrastructures relies on much invisible work—cataloging, metadata, and other labor conducted by information professionals. Continual investments in care and maintenance of the human and technical components of these infrastructures are necessary for sustainability.

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"Happy Beta Release Day, Omeka S!!"

Posted in Digital Archives and Special Collections, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Humanities, Open Source Software on November 3rd, 2016

The Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, George Mason University has released "Happy Beta Release Day, Omeka S!!."

Here's an excerpt:

Omeka S is the next-generation, open source web-publishing platform that is fully integrated into the scholarly communications ecosystem and designed to serve the needs of medium to large institutional users who wish to launch, monitor, and upgrade many sites from a single installation.

Though Omeka S is a completely new software package, it shares the same goals and principles of Omeka Classic that users have come to love: a commitment to cost-effective deployment and design, an intuitive user interface, open access to data and resources, and interoperability through standardized data.

Created with funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Omeka S is engineered to ease the burdens of administrators who want to make it possible for their end-user communities to easily build their own sites that showcase digital cultural heritage materials.

See also: Omeka S Beta Technical Specs.

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