Archive for the 'Digital Curation & Digital Preservation' Category

Special Issue of Library Trends on Institutional Repositories

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Metadata on March 30th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The latest issue of Library Trends (57, no. 2, Fall 2008) is about institutional repositories.

Here are the articles (links are to article preprints):

  • "Introduction: Institutional Repositories: Current State and Future"
  • "Innkeeper at the Roach Motel"
  • "Institutional Repositories in the UK: The JISC Approach"
  • "Strategies for Institutional Repository Development: A Case Study of Three Evolving Initiatives"
  • "Perceptions and Experiences of Staff in the Planning and Implementation of Institutional Repositories"
  • "Institutional Repositories and Research Data Curation in a Distributed Environment"
  • "At the Watershed: Preparing for Research Data Management and Stewardship at the University of Minnesota Libraries"
  • "Case Study in Data Curation at Johns Hopkins University"
  • "Describing Scholarly Works with Dublin Core: A Functional Approach"
  • "The 'Wealth of Networks' and Institutional Repositories: MIT, DSpace, and the Future of the Scholarly Commons"
  • "Leveraging Short-term Opportunities to Address Long-term Obligations: A Perspective on Institutional Repositories and Digital Preservation Programs"
  • "Shedding Light on the Dark Data in the Long Tail of Science"
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JISC Briefing Paper: Preservation of Web Resources

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on March 29th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

JISC has released Preservation of Web Resources.

Here's an excerpt:

There are institutional benefits to preserving web resources. Considerable time and money has been invested in the creation of digital outputs and content, and in their storage and maintenance. Although there are costs associated with launching a web preservation programme, it’s also money wasted if resources aren’t preserved. Institutions have responsibilities to: students and staff, who may make serious choices about their academic careers based on website information; and researchers and scholars, who may need to use the university’s resources in the future. Ensuring that the wider community has long-term access to research materials will be broadly beneficial.

There is also the matter of protecting institutions. Many risks are faced by organisations that choose to ignore web preservation. An institutional record may be required for the checking of strategic, legal, financial and contractual information, or simply for the day to day continued efficient running of the organisation. But there are external threats too. These include: data loss; loss of records and loss of resources; a failure to be information compliant (through not meeting Freedom of Information requests); risks of breaching copyright; and even risk of litigation from students or the public. Consider if a legal action were brought against an institution as a result of certain information that was exposed two years ago, and has since been taken down. Could the institution provide evidence, such as an audit trail, in court?

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Repositories Support Project Podcasts Launched

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Repositories, EPrints, Fedora, Institutional Repositories on March 28th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Repositories Support Project Podcasts has launched a podcast series.

Here are titles of the initial podcasts:

  • Digital Preservation: Are Repositories Doing Enough for Preservation?
  • DRIVER: Promoting Digital Repositories across Europe
  • EPrints: Repository Software of the Future or of the Past?
  • Fedora: Optimum Repository Software or Overkill?
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DCC Standards Watch Papers: Information Security Management: The ISO 27000 (ISO 27K) Series

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on March 28th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Digital Curation Centre has released Information Security Management: The ISO 27000 (ISO 27K) Series.

Here's an excerpt:

The flexibility of digital information can be regarded as a great strength. As software and hardware develop, data can be created, accessed, edited, manipulated and shared with increasing ease, The corollary is that data is vulnerable to unauthorised access, alteration or manipulation, which without checks can easily go undetected, and undermine its authoritative nature. Successful digital curation ensures that data is managed and protected so that its authority is maintained and retained throughout the curation lifecycle. To be authoritative data needs to remain authentic, reliable and useable, while retaining its integrity. These characteristics of data can be preserved through the implementation of an effective Information Security Management Systems (ISMS). . . .

The ISO/IEC 27000 is a series of standards which, when used together, specify the complete implementation of an ISMS. The series is still under development, with four of the planned standards currently published. Work is progressing on the completion of the remainder of standards ISO/IEC 27000 to ISO/IEC 27010. These cover the fundamental requirements of an ISMS, are applicable to any domain, and can be applied to any organisation regardless of size, structure or aim. ISO/IEC numbers after this have been reserved for sector specific implementation guidelines, most of which are still at the planning or pre-draft stage. The appendix summarises the development of the series to date.

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Copyright and Related Issues Relevant to Digital Preservation and Dissemination of Unpublished Pre-1972 Sound Recordings by Libraries and Archives

Posted in Copyright, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on March 13th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Council on Library and Information Resources has released Copyright and Related Issues Relevant to Digital Preservation and Dissemination of Unpublished Pre-1972 Sound Recordings by Libraries and Archives .

Here's an excerpt:

This report addresses the question of what libraries and archives are legally empowered to do to preserve and make accessible for research their holdings of unpublished pre-1972 sound recordings. The report's author, June M. Besek, is executive director of the Kernochan Center for Law, Media and the Arts at Columbia Law School.

Unpublished sound recordings are those created for private use, or even for broadcast, but that have not been distributed to the public in copies with the right holder's consent. Examples include tapes of live musical performances or of interviews conducted as part of field research or news gathering. Such recordings may find their way into library and archive collections through donations or purchase. Some may be the only record of a particular performance or event, and therefore may have considerable cultural and historical significance. The rights for use of unpublished recordings are distinct from those for use of commercial sound recordings, which are made with the authorization of rights holders and are intended for reproduction and sale to the public.

Using examples of specific types of sound recordings, the Besek study (1) describes the different bodies of law that protect pre-1972 sound recordings, (2) explains the difficulty in defining the precise contours of the law, and (3) provides guidance for libraries evaluating their activities with respect to unpublished pre-1972 sound recordings.

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DigitalPreservationEurope Briefing Paper on Database Preservation

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on March 11th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

DigitalPreservationEurope has released a briefing paper on Database Preservation.

Here's an excerpt:

Information systems for most organizations are currently supported by databases. Preservation of these databases has to address problems including defining what is to be preserved, the creation and long-term evolution of the preserved objects, organizational support for preservation actions, and technologies that will keep the preserved objects accessible and trustworthy. Some of the issues in database preservation have already been addressed in electronic record preservation, but others result from the specific nature of databases.

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How Long Should Institutional Repository Items Be Preserved?: Chris Rusbridge Discusses Results of Informal Surveys

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Institutional Repositories on March 10th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

In "Repository Preservation Revisited," Chris Rusbridge, Director of the Digital Curation Centre, discusses the findings of some informal surveys he conducted about how long institutional repository items should be preserved.

Here's an excerpt:

Note, I would not draw any conclusions from the actual numerical votes on their own, but perhaps we can from the values within each group. However, ever hasty if not foolhardy, here are my own tentative interpretations:

  • First, even "experts" are alarmed at the potential implications of the term "OAIS."
  • Second, repository managers don’t believe that keeping resources accessible and/or usable for 10 years (in the context of the types of material they currently manage in repositories) will give them major problems.
  • Third, repository managers don't identify "accessibility and/or usability of its contents for the long term" as implying the mechanisms of an OAIS (this is perhaps rather a stretch given my second conclusion).
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DPE Digital Preservation Video Training Course

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on March 3rd, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

DigitalPreservationEurope has released its Digital Preservation Video Training Course, a series of digital videos recorded at the DPE/Planets/CASPAR/nestor Joint Training Event: Starting out: Preserving Digital Objects-Principles and Practice in October 2008.

Here's an excerpt from the course page:

The training introduces participants to a number of key digital preservation principles. Participants will leave with:

  • an awareness and understanding of key digital preservation issues and challenges,
  • an appreciation of the range of roles and responsibilities involved with digital preservation activity,
  • knowledge about the reference model for Open Archival Information System (OAIS),
  • a familiarity with file formats currently considered beneficial for preservation,
  • a developed understanding of the role and use of metadata and representation information,
  • knowledge of the preservation planning process and its benefits to overall digital preservation strategies,
  • an insight into the concepts of trust and trustworthiness in the context of digital preservation,
  • a working knowledge of the issues surrounding audit methodologies and self-certification of digital repositories.
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iPRES 2008: Proceedings of The Fifth International Conference on Preservation of Digital Objects

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on March 2nd, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The British Library has released iPRES 2008: Proceedings of The Fifth International Conference on Preservation of Digital Objects: Joined Up and Working: Tools and Methods for Digital Preservation, The British Library, London. 29–30 September.

Here's an excerpt:

This volume brings together the proceedings of iPRES 2008, the Fifth International Conference on Digital Preservation, held at The British Library on 29-30 September, 2008. From its beginnings five years ago, iPRES has retained its strong international flavour. This year, it brings together over 250 participants from 33 countries and four continents. iPRES has become a major international forum for the exchange of ideas and practice in Digital Preservation. . . .

The iPRES 2008 conference theme and the papers gathered together here represent a major shift in the state-of-the-art. For the first time, this progress enabled the Programme Committee to establish two distinct tracks. The practitioner track is designed for those with an interest in practically preserving digital content within their organisation. The technical track is designed for those with an interest in underpinning concepts and digital preservation technology. Readers will find valuable insights to draw from in both areas.

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Briefing Paper on UMID—Unique Material Identifier

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Metadata on February 13th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

DigitalPreservationEurope has released a briefing paper on UMID—Unique Material Identifier

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

A Unique Material Identifier (UMID) is a special code that is used to identify audiovisual (AV) materials. The UMID is a core component in tagging AV content to enable its reliable access and tracking, especially in networked storage, production and dissemination systems. Its purpose is to provide unambiguous identification of material through the production and emission chain, as well as to make possible the reliable linking of essence with its metadata. The UMID is a locally generated and globally unique identifier, standardised by the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE), and presents a key component in digital media asset management systems.

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DCC Briefing Paper on "Interoperability"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on February 5th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Digital Curation Centre has released a new briefing paper on "Interoperability."

Here's an excerpt:

Interoperability is the transfer and use of information in a uniform and efficient manner across multiple organisations and IT systems. Its purpose is to create a shared understanding of data

Data exchange requires the data to be semantically matched (i.e. ensuring that the data describe the same thing) and for any differences in representation within the data models to be eliminated or meaningfully handled. Data integration is the process which takes heterogeneous data and their structural information and produces a unified description and mapping information to allow seamless access to all existing data. Interpretation of these data must be unambiguous. More generally, interoperability goes beyond data compatibility as we also need interoperable hardware, software, and communication protocols to allow data to be interpreted correctly and unambiguously across system or organisational boundaries

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Digital Preservation: JHOVE2 Functional Requirements Version 1.3 Released

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Standards on February 5th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

JHOVE2 Functional Requirements version 1.3 has been released. (Thanks to the File Formats Blog.)

Here's an excerpt from the JHOVE Project Scope:

JHOVE has proven to be a successful tool for format-specific digital object identification, validation, and characterization, and has been integrated into the workflows of most major international preservation institutions and programs. Using an extensible plug-in architecture, JHOVE provides support for a variety of digital formats commonly used to represent audio, image, and textual content.

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Issue 19: What's New in Digital Preservation?

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on February 5th, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Issue 19 of What's New in Digital Preservation? has been published.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Issue 19 features news from a range of organisations and initiatives, including the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC), Digital Curation Centre (DCC), JISC (UK), The British Library (BL), PLANETS (Preservation and Long-term Access through Networked Services), Cultural, Artistic and Scientific knowledge for Preservation, Access and Retrieval (CASPAR), University of London Computing Centre (ULCC), Alliance for Permanent Access, The Library of Congress and the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIPP) and The National Archives (TNA).

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Sustaining the Digital Investment: Issues and Challenges of Economically Sustainable Digital Preservation

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on February 3rd, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Blue Ribbon Task Force on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access has released Sustaining the Digital Investment: Issues and Challenges of Economically Sustainable Digital Preservation. Interim Report of the Blue Ribbon Task Force on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access.

Here's an excerpt:

During 2008, as the Task Force heard testimony from a broad spectrum of institutions and enterprises with deep experience in digital access and preservation, two things became clear: First, the problem is urgent. Access to data tomorrow requires decisions concerning preservation today. Imagine future biological research without a long-term strategy to preserve the Protein Data Bank (PDB), a digital collection that drives new insights into human systems and drug therapies for disease, and represents an investment of 100 billion dollars in research funding over the last 37 years. Decisions about the future of the PDB and other digital reference collections—how they will be migrated to future information technologies without interruption, what kind of infrastructure will protect their digital content against damage and loss of data, and how such efforts will be supported—must be made now to drive future innovation.

Second, the difficulty in identifying appropriate economic models is not just a matter of finding funding or setting a price. In many institutions and enterprises, systemic challenges create barriers for sustainable digital access and preservation.

Also see the related document: A Selective Literature Review on Digital Preservation Sustainability.

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LC Releases Understanding PREMIS

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Metadata on February 3rd, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Library of Congress Network Development and MARC Standards Office has released Understanding PREMIS.

Here's an excerpt:

This guide is a relatively brief overview of the PREMIS preservation metadata standard. It will not give you enough information to implement PREMIS, but it will give you some idea of what PREMIS is all about. For many readers, this will be enough. For those who do need to master the PREMIS Data Dictionary for Preservation Metadata, this guide may serve as a gentle introduction that makes the larger document feel more familiar.

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DigitalPreservationEurope Releases Two Briefing Papers on Scientific Data Preservation

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on February 2nd, 2009 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

DigitalPreservationEurope has released two briefing papers: "Data Preservation, Reuse and (Open) Access in High-Energy Physics" and "Digital Preservation for Long-Term Environmental Monitoring."

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