Archive for the 'Digital Curation & Digital Preservation' Category

Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010

Posted in Bibliographies, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Scholarship Publications on March 6th, 2011

Digital Scolarship has released the Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010. This 80-page book presents over 500 English-language articles, books, and technical reports that are useful in understanding digital curation and preservation. This selective bibliography covers digital curation and preservation copyright issues, digital formats (e.g., data, media, and e-journals), metadata, models and policies, national and international efforts, projects and institutional implementations, research studies, services, strategies, and digital repository concerns. Most sources have been published from 2000 through 2010; however, a limited number of key sources published prior to 2000 are also included. Many references have links to freely available copies of included works.

The Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 is available as an open access PDF file and as a $9.95 paperback. All versions of the bibliography are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.

For further information about Digital Scholarship publications, see the "Digital Scholarship Publications Overview" and "Reviews of Digital Scholarship Publications."

 Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 cover

Be Sociable, Share!

    "Breaking Down Link Rot: The Chesapeake Project Legal Information Archive’s Examination of URL Stability"

    Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Electronic Resources on March 2nd, 2011

    Sarah Rhodes has published "Breaking Down Link Rot: The Chesapeake Project Legal Information Archive's Examination of URL Stability" in LLRX.com.

    Here's an excerpt:

    In analyzing a single sample of these original URLs at annual intervals, the prevalence of link rot was 8.3% in 2008, within zero to twelve months of the content being harvested. One year later, twelve to twenty-four months after the content was harvested, link rot in the same sample was found to have jumped to 14.3%. In the most recent analysis, in 2010, link rot was found to be 27.9%. In other words, link rot increased from about one in every twelve archived titles in 2008, to one in every seven titles in 2009, and finally to about one in every 3.5 titles in 2010.

    | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Reviews of Digital Scholarship Publications |

    Be Sociable, Share!

      NEH Issues Call for Proposals for Preservation and Access Research and Development Grants

      Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Humanities, Grants on March 1st, 2011

      The National Endowment for the Humanities's Division of Preservation and Access has issued a call for proposals for Preservation and Access Research and Development grants. Application deadline: May 19, 2011.

      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

      Eligible projects include:

      • the development of technical standards, best practices, and tools for preserving and creating access to humanities collections;
      • the exploration of more effective scientific and technical methods of preserving humanities collections;
      • the development of automated procedures and computational tools to integrate, analyze, and repurpose humanities data in disparate online resources; and
      • the investigation and testing of new ways of providing digital access to humanities materials that are not easily digitized using current methods.

      NEH especially encourages applications that address the following topics:

      • Digital Preservation: how to preserve digital humanities materials, including born-digital materials, for which there is no analog counterpart;
      • Recorded Sound and Moving Image Collections: how to preserve and increase access to the record of the twentieth century contained in these formats; and
      • Preventive Conservation: how to protect humanities collections and slow their deterioration through the use of sustainable preservation strategies.. . .

      The maximum award is $350,000 for up to three years. Applicants whose projects focus on any of the three areas of special interest noted above may request up to $400,000.

      | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Reviews of Digital Scholarship Publications |

      Be Sociable, Share!

        Lasting Change: Sustaining Digital Scholarship and Culture in Canada

        Posted in Copyright, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Humanities, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Communication on February 24th, 2011

        The Sustaining Digital Scholarship for Sustainable Culture Group has released Lasting Change: Sustaining Digital Scholarship and Culture in Canada.

        Here's an excerpt:

        This report reflects the growing concern in the scholarly and cultural communities, and beyond, regarding the sustainability of Canada's digital knowledge and heritage. Canada's digital advantage is only of value if it can be carried into the future. Canadians must meet the challenge of preserving and enhancing scholarly and artistic knowledge production and our culture in a digital environment. This report reviews the current state of knowledge about the sustainability of digital scholarship and related cultural activity in Canada and identifies research opportunities that emerge from consideration of the literature.

        | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

        Be Sociable, Share!

          Managing Digital Collections: A Collaborative Initiative on the South African Framework

          Posted in Copyright, Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Libraries, Metadata on February 10th, 2011

          The National Research Foundation has released Managing Digital Collections: A Collaborative Initiative on the South African Framework.

          Here's an excerpt:

          The objective of this Framework is to provide high-level principles for planning and managing the full digital collection life cycle. It aims to

          • provide an overview of some of the major components and activities involved in creating good digital collections
          • provide a sense of the landscape of digital collections management
          • identify existing resources that support the development of sound local practices
          • encourage community participation in the ongoing development of best practices for digital collection building
          • contribute to the benefits of sound data management practices, as well as the goals of data sharing and long term access
          • introduce data management and curation issues
          • assist cultural heritage organisations to create and manage complex digital collections
          • assist funding organisations who wish to encourage and support the development of good digital collections
          • advocate the use of internationally-created appropriate open community standards to ensure quality and to increase global interoperability for better exchange and re-use of data and digital content.

          | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

          Be Sociable, Share!

            Randy S. Kiefer Named as Executive Director of CLOCKSS

            Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on January 25th, 2011

            Randy S. Kiefer has been named as the Executive Director of the CLOCKSS Archive.

            Here's an excerpt from the press release:

            The CLOCKSS Archive (http://www.clockss.org) is pleased to announce the appointment of Randy S. Kiefer as their new Executive Director. Randy is the Principal Consultant in the Kiefer Strategy Group, LLC, which handles business development efforts for publishers like INFORMS, the American Accounting Association, the Military Operations Research Society, and others. From 1999 to May of 2010, Randy served in various roles at INFORMS. For his last three years, he was the Director of Subscription, Membership, and Technical Services at INFORMS, and his primary activity was developing the global library market for INFORMS' twelve journals.

            Randy is a board member of COIN-OR (http://www.coin-or.org) , an organization dedicated to open-source software for the operations research community. and is on the board of two charitable organizations in the Baltimore area. Randy has been active in software development since 1985. . . .

            Gordon Tibbitts, outgoing CLOCKSS executive director and President Atypon Systems declares, "The CLOCKSS Archive, now one year old is well placed for its next phase of growth. The Board of Directors is very pleased to have Randy on board as the Archive's first full time Executive Director."

            CLOCKSS is a global nonprofit, community-governed archive that preserves digital scholarly materials for the very long term through a geo-physical and geo-political distributed network of archive nodes.

            | Digital Scholarship |

            Be Sociable, Share!

              "Digital Preservation Outreach and Education (DPOE) Training Needs Assessment Survey: Executive Summary"

              Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on January 23rd, 2011

              The Library of Congress Digital Preservation Outreach and Education (DPOE) initiative has released the "Digital Preservation Outreach and Education (DPOE) Training Needs Assessment Survey: Executive Summary."

              Here's an excerpt from the announcement :

              The survey was conducted in summer and fall 2010 by the Library’s Digital Preservation Outreach and Education initiative which seeks to foster outreach, education and collaboration nationwide to encourage organizations to preserve their digital content, regardless of staff or budget size or location.

              The survey received 868 responses. Of the respondents, 40% were libraries, 34% were archives and 16% were museums. The rest consisted of state and local governments, corporations, nonprofit organizations, parks, and churches.

              Among the survey’s major findings:

              • Just over half of the organizations who responded to the survey have less than 25 employees.
              • Only about one-third of respondents had full-time or part-time paid staff dedicated to digital preservation duties. One-half of respondents assigned digital preservation to various staff on an as-needed basis, one-fifth had no staff for this function, and one-tenth used volunteers (figures have been rounded off).
              • Among potential subject areas for digital preservation training, the most important area to respondents was technical training. Management planning, project management and strategic training all tied for second place.
              • The most preferred format for receiving training was small, in-person workshops. Proximity was significant—onsite training was the first choice, with training within a 100-mile radius the second choice.
              • A half-day to a full day was the most preferred length for training.
              • Digital content holdings for almost 95 percent of respondents consisted entirely of digitized versions of already-held collections (typically, paper-based materials), and about 5 percent of holdings were "born digital" content.

              Some general observations can be gleaned from the survey. Most organizations only work on digital preservation when it is needed; few devote a full-time staff member to such duties. Most are digitizing paper collections rather than preserving "born digital" data. Short sessions of practical training are most needed; training should be provided on-site because most respondents are small organizations with limited training budgets.

              | Digital Scholarship |

              Be Sociable, Share!

                "Data Preservation in High Energy Physics"

                Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on January 20th, 2011

                David M. South has self-archived "Data Preservation in High Energy Physics" in arXiv.org.

                Here's an excerpt:

                Data from high-energy physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are in many cases unique. At the same time, HEP has no coherent strategy for data preservation and re-use, and many important and complex data sets are simply lost. In a period of a few years, several important and unique experimental programs will come to an end, including those at HERA, the b-factories and at the Tevatron. An inter-experimental study group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis (DPHEP) was formed and a series of workshops were held to investigate this issue in a systematic way. The physics case for data preservation and the preservation models established by the group are presented, as well as a description of the transverse global projects and strategies already in place.

                | Digital Scholarship |

                Be Sociable, Share!

                  Page 34 of 69« First...1020...3233343536...405060...Last »

                  DigitalKoans

                  DigitalKoans

                  Digital Scholarship

                  Copyright © 2005-2014 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

                  Creative Commons License

                  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.