Archive for the 'Digital Repositories' Category

"Have Digital Repositories Come of Age? The Views of Library Directors"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access on January 20th, 2014

David Nicholas et al. have published "Have Digital Repositories Come of Age? The Views of Library Directors" in Webology.

Here's an excerpt:

This survey of approximately 150 repositories assessed the achievements, impact, and success of digital repositories. Results show that while the size and use of repositories has been relatively modest, almost half of all institutions either have, or are planning, a repository mandate requiring deposit and small gains have been made in raising the profile of the library within the institution. Repositories, then, have made a good deal of progress, but they have not quite come of age.

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    "Flexible and Extensible Digital Object and Repository Architecture (FEDORA)"

    Posted in Digital Repositories, Fedora, Institutional Repositories on December 6th, 2013

    Sandra Payette and Carl Lagoze have self-archived "Flexible and Extensible Digital Object and Repository Architecture (FEDORA)."

    Here's an excerpt:

    We describe a digital object and repository architecture for storing and disseminating digital library content. The key features of the architecture are: (1) support for heterogeneous data types; (2) accommodation of new types as they emerge; (3) aggregation of mixed, possibly distributed, data into complex objects; (4) the ability to specify multiple content disseminations of these objects; and (5) the ability to associate rights management schemes with these disseminations. This architecture is being implemented in the context of a broader research project to develop next-generation service modules for a layered digital library architecture.

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      "Cultures of Access: Differences in Rhetoric around Open Access Repositories in Africa and the United States and Their Implications for the Open Access Movement"

      Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on December 5th, 2013

      Natalia T. Bowdoin has self-archived "Cultures of Access: Differences in Rhetoric around Open Access Repositories in Africa and the United States and Their Implications for the Open Access Movement."

      Here's an excerpt:

      For this study I examined the rhetoric used by OA institutional repositories and what this rhetoric may say about different "cultures of OA." I conducted textual analysis of 46 websites of OA repositories in the United States and 14 Sub-Saharan African nations. Analysis of the specific rhetoric used to present the OA repositories reveals differing views on the importance of OA in terms of cultural ideas about information control, access to information, and social capital.

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        "Open-Access Repositories Worldwide, 2005-2012: Past Growth, Current Characteristics and Future Possibilities"

        Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Institutional Repositories, Open Access on October 23rd, 2013

        Stephen Pinfield et al. have self-archived "Open-Access Repositories Worldwide, 2005-2012: Past Growth, Current Characteristics and Future Possibilities" in White Rose Research Online.

        Here's an excerpt:

        This paper reviews the worldwide growth of open-access (OA) repositories, December 2005 to December 2012, using data collected by the OpenDOAR project. It shows that initial repository development was focused on North America, Western Europe and Australasia, particularly the USA, UK, Germany and Australia. Soon after, Japan increased its repository numbers. Since 2010, other geographical areas and countries have seen repository growth, including East Asia (especially Taiwan), South America (especially Brazil) and Eastern Europe (especially Poland). During the whole period, countries such as France, Italy and Spain have maintained steady growth, whereas countries such as China and Russia have experienced relatively low levels of growth. Globally, repositories are predominantly institutional, multidisciplinary and English-language-based. They typically use open-source OAI-compliant repository software but remain immature in terms of explicit licensing arrangements. Whilst the size of repositories is difficult to assess accurately, the available data indicate that a small number of large repositories and a large number of small repositories make up the repository landscape. These trends and characteristics are analyzed using Innovation Diffusion Theory (IDT) building on previous studies. IDT is shown to provide a useful explanatory framework for understanding repository adoption at various levels: global, national, organizational and individual. Major factors affecting both the initial development of repositories and their take up by users are identified, including IT infrastructure, language, cultural factors, policy initiatives, awareness-raising activity and usage mandates. It is argued that mandates in particular are likely to play a crucial role in determining future repository development.

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          "Fedora Commons with Apache Hadoop: A Research Study"

          Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories on October 15th, 2013

          Mohamed Mohideen Abdul Rasheed have published "Fedora Commons with Apache Hadoop: A Research Study" in the latest issue of Code4Lib Journal.

          Here's an excerpt:

          The Digital Collections digital repository at the University of Maryland Libraries is growing and in need of a new backend storage system to replace the current filesystem storage. Though not a traditional storage management system, we chose to evaluate Apache Hadoop because of its large and growing community and software ecosystem. Additionally, Hadoop's capabilities for distributed computation could prove useful in providing new kinds of digital object services and maintenance for ever increasing amounts of data. We tested storage of Fedora Commons data in the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) using an early development version of Akubra-HDFS interface created by Frank Asseg. This article examines the findings of our research study, which evaluated Fedora-Hadoop integration in the areas of performance, ease of access, security, disaster recovery, and costs.

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            "Who and What Links to the Internet Archive"

            Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Repositories on September 19th, 2013

            Yasmin AlNoamany, Ahmed AlSum, Michele C. Weigle, and Michael L. Nelson have self-archived "Who and What Links to the Internet Archive" in arXiv.org.

            Here's an excerpt:

            The Internet Archive's (IA) Wayback Machine is the largest and oldest public web archive and has become a significant repository of our recent history and cultural heritage. Despite its importance, there has been little research about how it is discovered and used. Based on web access logs, we analyze what users are looking for, why they come to IA, where they come from, and how pages link to IA. We find that users request English pages the most, followed by the European languages. Most human users come to web archives because they do not find the requested pages on the live web. About 65% of the requested archived pages no longer exist on the live web. We find that more than 82% of human sessions connect to the Wayback Machine via referrals from other web sites, while only 15% of robots have referrers. Most of the links (86%) from websites are to individual archived pages at specific points in time, and of those 83% no longer exist on the live web.

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              "2013 Open Repositories Conference Highlights: Repository Island in Sea of Research Data"

              Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access on September 17th, 2013

              Carol Minton Morris has published "2013 Open Repositories Conference Highlights: Repository Island in Sea of Research Data" in the latest issue of D-Lib Magazine.

              Here's an excerpt:

              The Eighth International Conference on Open Repositories 2013 was held July 8-12, 2013 on Prince Edward Island, Canada. The annual conference offers attendees an opportunity to learn about new ways to access information, innovative repository tools, and emerging community initiatives. More than 300 attendees came to OR2013 to meet with colleagues, keep up with fast-paced development goals, and hear expert speakers who are attuned to current repository issues.

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                figshare for Institutions Launched

                Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Repositories, Open Science on September 5th, 2013

                figshare has launched an instiutional service for research data.

                Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                figshare today announces the launch of 'figshare for Institutions'—a simple and cost-effective software solution for academic and higher education establishments to both securely host and make publicly available its academic research outputs. figshare, allows academic institutions to publish, share and get credit for their research data, hosting videos, datasets, posters, figures and theses in a cost-effective way.

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                  AAU, ARL, and APLU Establish SHARE Steering Group

                  Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on September 3rd, 2013

                  AAU, ARL, and APLU have established the SHARE Steering Group.

                  Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                  The Association of Research Libraries (ARL), the Association of American Universities (AAU), and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) today announced the formation of a joint steering group to advance a proposed network of digital repositories at universities, libraries, and other research institutions across the US that will provide long-term public access to federally funded research articles and data.

                  The steering group will oversee a feasibility study, guide policy, and explore governance structures necessary for prototyping and implementing the network. This repository network, the Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE), is being developed as one response to a White House directive instructing federal funding agencies to make the results of research they fund available to the public.

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                    "Open Access and the Changing Landscape of Research Impact Indicators: New Roles for Repositories"

                    Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Scholarly Metrics on July 24th, 2013

                    Isabel Bernal has published "Open Access and the Changing Landscape of Research Impact Indicators: New Roles for Repositories" in Publications.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    The debate about the need to revise metrics that evaluate research excellence has been ongoing for years, and a number of studies have identified important issues that have yet to be addressed. Internet and other technological developments have enabled the collection of richer data and new approaches to research assessment exercises. Open access strongly advocates for maximizing research impact by enhancing seamless accessibility. In addition, new tools and strategies have been used by open access journals and repositories to showcase how science can benefit from free online dissemination. Latest players in the debate include initiatives based on alt-metrics, which enrich the landscape with promising indicators. To start with, the article gives a brief overview of the debate and the role of open access in advancing a new frame to assess science. Next, the work focuses on the strategy that the Spanish National Research Council's repository DIGITAL.CSIC is implementing to collect a rich set of statistics and other metrics that are useful for repository administrators, researchers and the institution alike. A preliminary analysis of data hints at correlations between free dissemination of research through DIGITAL.CSIC and enhanced impact, reusability and sharing of CSIC science on the web.

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                      "Hita-Hita: Open Access and Institutional Repositories in Japan Ten Years On"

                      Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on July 23rd, 2013

                      Ikuko Tsuchide et al. have published "Hita-Hita: Open Access and Institutional Repositories in Japan Ten Years On" in the latest issue of Ariadne.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      This article introduces several ideas and projects that have enhanced the penetration of the OA movement and development of institutional repositories in Japan. Moreover, it also outlines the activities of Digital Repository Federation (DRF)[6], a repository managers' community made up of 145 universities and research institutions that has supported such ideas. The term 'hita-hita' means to be tenacious, persevering and to work step by step without giving up. We adopt the term as the title of this article as we believe 'hita-hita' accurately expresses the character of our continued activity in this area.

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                        Presentations from Open Repositories 2013

                        Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access on July 22nd, 2013

                        Presentations from Open Repositories 2013 are now available.

                        Here's a brief selection of talks:

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