Archive for the 'Disciplinary Archives' Category

"The Next Stage of SocArXiv’s Development: Bringing Greater Transparency and Efficiency to the Peer Review Process"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, E-Prints, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on October 17th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Philip Cohen has published "The Next Stage of SocArXiv's Development: Bringing Greater Transparency and Efficiency to the Peer Review Proces" in LSE Impact of Social Sciences.

Here's an excerpt:

Looking ahead to the next stage of its development, Philip Cohen considers how SocArXiv might challenge the peer review system to be more efficient and transparent, firstly by confronting the bias that leads many who benefit from the status quo to characterise mooted alternatives as extreme. The value and implications of openness at the various decision points in the system must be debated, as should potentially more disruptive innovations such as non-exclusive review and publication or crowdsourcing reviews.

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Lots of Institutional Repositories Keep E-prints Safe

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on October 12th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The seductive allure of a commercial mega repository is two-fold: (1) everything is conveniently in one place, and (2) a company is taking care of the dreary and expensive business of running it.

Everything seems fine: problem solved! That is until something goes wrong, such as the repository being bought and controlled by a publisher or being threatened by lawsuits by a coterie of publishers.

Then it's important to remember: it's a company, and companies exist to make a profit.

Heh, companies are great. I wouldn't have just had that tasty cup of coffee without them. But, we should be very clear about what motivates companies and controls their behavior. And we shouldn't be shocked if they do things that aren't motivated by lofty goals.

I know: institutional repositories are hard work. The bloom is off the rose. But they exist to serve higher education, not make money, and they part of the academic communities they serve. And they can't be bought. And their universities don't often go out of business. And there are a lot of them. And they are not likely to be attractive targets for lawsuits unless something has gone very, very wrong at the local level.

Copyright is complicated. No one is advocating that we ignore it and just shove e-prints into IR's willy-nilly. Getting faculty to understand the ins and outs of e-print copyright is no picnic, nor is monitoring for compliance. But the battle is easier to fight at the local level where one-on-one faculty to librarian communication is possible.

For self-archiving to flourish in the long run, institutional repositories must flourish. By and large, librarians establish, run, and support them, and they are the quiet heroes of green open access who will continue to provide a sustainable and reliable infrastructure for self-archiving.

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"Has the Open Access Movement Delayed the Revolution?"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on October 12th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Richard Poynder has published "Has the Open Access Movement Delayed the Revolution?" in Open and Shut?.

Here's an excerpt:

As I said, publishers are also co-opting green OA. They are doing this by buying up repository platforms like SSRN and bepress, for instance, and by imposing lengthy embargoes before green OA papers can be made freely available. Again, the OA movement has assisted in this by, for instance, advocating for and supporting OA policies that accept publisher-imposed embargoes as a given, and by partnering with publishers in initiatives that turn repositories into little more than search interfaces. This has the effect of directing users away from repositories to legacy publishers’ sites (see here for instance, and here).

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ACS Launches ChemRxiv

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, EPrints, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on August 16th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

ACS has launched ChemRxiv.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

ChemRxiv, a new chemistry preprint server for the global chemistry community, is now available in a fully functioning Beta version for use and feedback by researchers. The Beta launch has been undertaken with initial strategic input from the American Chemical Society (ACS), Royal Society of Chemistry, German Chemical Society and other not-for profit organizations, as well as other scientific publishers and preprint services. The free-of-charge service, originally announced late last year, is managed on behalf of the chemical science community by ACS and is powered by Figshare, an online digital repository for academic research.

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SSRN Launches ChemRN (Chemistry Research Network)

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Publishing, Self-Archiving on August 8th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

SSRN has launched ChemRN

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Chemistry researchers can share ideas and other early stage research, including posting preprints and working papers on ChemRN. Users can quickly upload and read papers for free, across all of Chemistry, including the fields of Energy, Environmental and Materials Sciences.

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SSRN Launches Biology Research Network (BioRN)

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on June 9th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

SSRN has launched the Biology Research Network (BioRN).

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Biology researchers are able to post preprints and working papers on BioRN, share ideas and other early stage research, and collaborate. It allows users to quickly upload and read abstracts and full-text papers, free of charge. A preprint is the author’s own write-up of research results and analysis that has not been peer-reviewed or had any value added to it by a publisher (such as formatting, copy-editing, technical enhancements). A preprint server, or working paper repository as they are also known, allows users to share these documents.

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2018-2022: Sustainability Plan for Classic arXiv

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives on March 30th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Cornell University has released 2018-2022: Sustainability Plan for Classic arXiv .

Here's an excerpt:

As 2017 is the last year of the current five-year business model , working with the Member Advisory Board (MAB), the arXiv team has created a sustainability model for 2018–2022. The purpose of the plan is to lay out a business model for arXiv including anticipated expenses, potential revenue streams, value propositions, and communication strategies. The plan entails only the regular operation of arXiv—in other words, what we call "keeping the lights on." It should be seen as a baseline operational budget, as it does not factor in additional expenses required for R&D or new development projects such as arXiv-NG.

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"Scraping Scientific Web Repositories: Challenges and Solutions for Automated Content Extraction"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Institutional Repositories on September 16th, 2016 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Philipp Meschenmoser, Norman Meuschke, Manuel Hotz, and Bela Gipp have published "Scraping Scientific Web Repositories: Challenges and Solutions for Automated Content Extraction" in D-Lib Magazine.

Here's an excerpt:

Many researchers are interested in accessing the underlying scientometric raw data to increase the transparency of these systems. In this paper, we discuss the challenges and present strategies to programmatically access such data in scientific Web repositories. We demonstrate the strategies as part of an open source tool (MIT license) that allows research performance comparisons based on Google Scholar data.

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"Just as Open Competitor to Elsevier’s SSRN Launches, SSRN Accused of Copyright Crackdown"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Publishing on July 21st, 2016 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Mike Masnick has published "Just as Open Competitor to Elsevier's SSRN Launches, SSRN Accused of Copyright Crackdown" in Techdirt.

Here's an excerpt:

And perhaps this [SocArXiv announcement]came just in time, because just as that happened, Stephen Henderson, a law professor, noted that SSRN took down his paper saying that they didn't think he retained the copyright to it.

See also: "SocArXiv Debuts, as SSRN acquisition Comes Under Scrutiny."

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"Developing SocArXiv—A New Open Archive of the Social Sciences to Challenge the Outdated Journal System"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Self-Archiving on July 12th, 2016 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Philip Cohen has published "Developing SocArXiv—A New Open Archive of the Social Sciences to Challenge the Outdated Journal System" in LSE Impact.

Here's an excerpt:

But there remains a need for a new general, open-access, open-source, paper server for the social sciences, one that encourages linking and sharing data and code, that serves its research to an open metadata system, and that provides the foundation for a post-publication review system. I hope that SocArXiv will enable us to save research from the journal system. Once it's built, anyone will be able to use it to organize their own peer-review community, to select and publish papers (though not exclusively), to review and comment on each other's work – and to discover, cite, value, and share research unimpeded. We will be able to do this because of a partnership with the Center for Open Science (which is already developing a new preprint server) and SHARE ("a free, open, data set about research and scholarly activities across their life cycle"). We are also supported by the University of Maryland, which hosts the initiative.

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"The Open Access Interviews: Sir Timothy Gowers, Mathematician"

Posted in Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 21st, 2016 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Richard Poynder has published "The Open Access Interviews: Sir Timothy Gowers, Mathematician " in Open and Shut?.

Here's an excerpt:

The idea of arXiv overlay journals was in the air for a long time. I think one impulse behind Discrete Analysis was the very hostile reaction from many people to the setting up of the open access journal Forum of Mathematics by Cambridge University Press, which (after a three-year free period) charges £750 per article.

It seems that a large proportion of mathematicians are implacably opposed to article processing charges, no matter what assurances are given that authors themselves will never be expected to pay out of their own pocket, and that ability to pay will not affect the choice of which articles to publish.

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"The Role of arXiv, RePEc, SSRN and PMC in Formal Scholarly Communication"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Self-Archiving on October 5th, 2015 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Xuemei Li has self-archived "The Role of arXiv, RePEc, SSRN and PMC in Formal Scholarly Communication."

Here's an excerpt:

The four major Subject Repositories (SRs), arXiv, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Social Science Research Network (SSRN) and PubMed Central (PMC), are all important within their disciplines but no previous study has systematically compared how often they are cited in academic publications. In response, this article reports an analysis of citations to SRs from Scopus publications, 2000 to 2013.

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