Archive for the 'E-Books' Category

"A Comparison of E-book and Print Book Discovery, Preferences, and Usage by Science and Engineering Faculty and Graduate Students at the University of Kansas"

Posted in E-Books, Electronic Resources, Scholarly Books on April 7th, 2014

Julie Waters et al. have published "A Comparison of E-book and Print Book Discovery, Preferences, and Usage by Science and Engineering Faculty and Graduate Students at the University of Kansas" in Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship.

Here's an excerpt:

The availability of science and technology e-books through the University of Kansas Libraries is growing rapidly through approval plans, e-book packages, and electronic demand-driven acquisitions. Based on informal conversations with faculty, questions still lingered as to the acceptance of books in the electronic format by faculty and graduate students in the STEM disciplines. To learn more about book format preferences, a survey was distributed via e-mail to 1,898 faculty and graduate students in science and technology at the University of Kansas. The survey included questions focused on print book use, e-book use, format preferences, and demographics. A majority of the 357 respondents indicated a preference for print books indicating many of the oft-repeated comments about the disadvantages of reading books on a computer. Patrons using tablets were more inclined to access e-books. The survey indicated a continuing need to purchase books in both print and electronic formats, and to market the availability of e-books to University of Kansas patrons.

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    "E-Book Platforms for Academic Librarians"

    Posted in Copyright, E-Books, Licenses, Publishing, Scholarly Books on February 25th, 2014

    Audrey Powers has self-archived "E-Book Platforms for Academic Librarians."

    Here's an excerpt:

    The goal of this issue is to provide a succinct overview of e-book platforms for academic librarians as well as insights into where e-book platforms are headed in the future. Most of the authors work in academic libraries and their job responsibilities include developing, procuring, promoting, and educating users about e-books. The topics covered include an overview of e-book platforms including technical aspects and business models, lending platforms, aggregator platforms, commercial publisher platforms, and university press platforms. It is our hope that when you read these articles it will add to your knowledge base about the current and future state of e-book platforms in academic libraries.

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      "E-Book Monopolies and the Law"

      Posted in Copyright, Digital Rights Management, E-Books, Publishing on January 22nd, 2014

      Angela Daly has self-archived "E-Book Monopolies and the Law" in SSRN

      Here's an excerpt:

      This article will examine the legality of the digital rights management ("DRM") measures used by the major e-book publishers and device manufacturers in the United States, European Union and Australia not only to enforce their intellectual property rights but also to create monopolistic content silos, restrict interoperability and affect the ability for users to use the content they have bought in the way they wish. The analysis will then proceed to the recent competition investigations in the US and EU over price-fixing in e-book markets, and the current litigation against Amazon in the US for an alleged abuse of its dominant position. A final point will be made on possible responses in Australia to these issues taking into account the jurisprudence on DRM in other scenarios.

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        E-Reading Rises as Device Ownership Jumps

        Posted in E-Books, Electronic Resources, Publishing, Reports and White Papers on January 17th, 2014

        The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released E-Reading Rises as Device Ownership Jumps.

        Here's an excerpt:

        The percentage of adults who read an e-book in the past year has risen to 28%, up from 23% at the end of 2012. At the same time, about seven in ten Americans reported reading a book in print, up four percentage points after a slight dip in 2012, and 14% of adults listened to an audiobook.

        Though e-books are rising in popularity, print remains the foundation of Americans' reading habits. Most people who read e-books also read print books, and just 4% of readers are "e-book only." Audiobook listeners have the most diverse reading habits overall, while fewer print readers consume books in other formats.

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          Stop the Presses: Is the Monograph Headed toward an E-only Future?

          Posted in E-Books, Publishing, Scholarly Books on December 11th, 2013

          Ithaka S+R has released Stop the Presses: Is the Monograph Headed toward an E-only Future?.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          Can we expect the print monograph to disappear anytime soon?

          While the road to a fully digital future for scholarly monographs is not clearly in sight, the widespread availability of e-books is already transforming researchers' reading habits. As librarians and publishers consider their options, they must take into account how the usage behavior of academics is evolving. In this Issue Brief, Roger Schonfeld explores the challenges and possibilities if we "Stop the Presses."

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            "Books, E and P"

            Posted in E-Books, Publishing on December 3rd, 2013

            Walt Crawford has published "Books, E and P" in the latest issue of Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large.

            Here's an excerpt:

            You might think of this discussion as Part 3 of WORDS: THE EBOOK MARKETPLACE. It is another set of notes and comments on material ranging back as far as May 2010 and related to ebooks, but it's really about books and the media in which they appear.

            Note another key distinction from previous discussions in this area: E and P, not E versus P. Sure, some of these items make the digital-triumphalist assumption that print books will die out within the next generation (or next five years!) or become irrelevant collectibles, and there may be a few suggesting that ebooks will disappear or become a niche segment (although that seems unlikely). But my sense—not yet tested, since I'm writing this preface before beginning the essay—is that much of the discussion is now more nuanced and plausible, starting with the real-world fact that old media rarely die and the likelihood that there's room in this world for both print books and ebooks, in very large quantities in both cases, for the foreseeable future.

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              "Cost Differentials between E-Books and Print in Academic Libraries"

              Posted in E-Books, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on October 31st, 2013

              College & Research Libraries has released an e-print of "Cost Differentials between E-Books and Print in Academic Libraries."

              Here's an excerpt:

              A survey conducted at Auburn University at Montgomery (AUM) has confirmed for academic libraries the work of Gray and Copeland on e-books being more expensive than print for public libraries. For AUM, the mean cost for e-books are significantly higher than for the print counterpart of those titles. The cost differentials between the two formats show e-books as being consistently higher than print in initial price. This consistency holds true across all LC classifications, regardless of whether or not the title is published by a university press or a commercial press.

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                OAPEN-NL: A Project Exploring Open Access Monograph Publishing in the Netherlands

                Posted in E-Books, Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Books on October 24th, 2013

                SURF has released OAPEN-NL: A Project Exploring Open Access Monograph Publishing in the Netherlands.

                Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                Between June 2011 and November 2012, fifty Open Access monographs in various subject areas were published in Open Access by nine participating publishers. For every Open Access title, the publishers provided a similar title that was published in the conventional way. Data were collected about usage, sales and costs, to study the effect of Open Access on monographs. OAPEN-NL consisted of a quantitative and a qualitative research component, measuring the effects of Open Access publishing and the perceptions and expectations of publishers and authors.

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