Archive for the 'E-Books' Category

Perception Analysis of Scholarly E-Books in the Humanities at the Collegiate Level

Posted in Digital Humanities, E-Books, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on April 15th, 2013

ACLS Humanities E-Book has released Perception Analysis of Scholarly E-Books in the Humanities at the Collegiate Level.

Here's an excerpt:

At present, there is significant market confusion regarding e-book selections in the academic marketplace, particularly in the humanities. University acquisition librarians, unsure of what the offerings actually are, have found themselves unsure of where to allocate funds, which has resulted in the postponement of e-book purchases. This paper provides a current assessment of the status of e-book offerings in the humanities.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

Be Sociable, Share!

    "A Pilot Using OverDrive: E-lending in Academic Law Libraries"

    Posted in E-Books, Licenses on April 3rd, 2013

    Nina E. Scholtz has published "A Pilot Using OverDrive: E-lending in Academic Law Libraries" in the latest issue of AALL Spectrum.

    Here's an excerpt:

    With these increasing signs of a strong future for e-books, and possibly for e-lending as well, in spring 2012 Cornell University Law Library decided to pilot OverDrive for the Cornell Law School community. . . .

    Exploring the future of e-book lending was a natural fit for us. And by embarking on a pilot of the OverDrive service, we could test the waters of e-lending in a cost-efficient way that would not be prohibitive in terms of staff time and library resources. The service would allow us to see specifically how our users would respond to an e-lending program. The library had already successfully introduced a popular small-print reading collection. Trying out an online component to this simple but well-liked outreach program seemed like a logical progression. With these thoughts in mind, in June 2012 we signed a contract with OverDrive for a one-year pilot period.

    | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap |

    Be Sociable, Share!

      Open Monograph Press, Release 1.0

      Posted in E-Books, Open Access, Open Source Software, Publishing, Scholarly Books on March 28th, 2013

      The Public Knowledge Project has released the Open Monograph Press, Release 1.0.

      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

      OMP is designed to assist university presses, learned societies, and scholar-publishers interested in publishing scholarly books in print-on-demand and multiple electronic formats, whether on an open access or purchase basis. OMP is intended to:

      • Handle edited volumes, with different authors for each chapter;
      • Involve editors, authors, reviewers, designers, indexers, and others in book production;
      • See submission through multiple rounds of both internal and external reviews;
      • Utilize industry standard ONIX for bookseller metadata requirements (e.g., Amazon);
      • Create document libraries for submissions, recording contracts, permissions, etc.;
      • Handle thumbnail covers in Catalog, as well as Spotlight features; and
      • Enable Series Editors to see books through review to publication.

      | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap |

      Be Sociable, Share!

        "Beyond TEI: Returning the Text to the Reader"

        Posted in E-Books, Metadata, Publishing, Scholarly Communication on March 20th, 2013

        Christian Wittern has published "Beyond TEI: Returning the Text to the Reader" in the latest issue of the Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative.

        Here's an excerpt:

        Much research and effort has been invested in creating a versatile format for digital texts and the TEI is now widely used in many communities. Much less consolidated thought has been spend to publish and distribute digital texts in ways that are most useful to scholars. To remedy this situation, this paper proposes new, additional publication forms for digital texts through distributed version control systems. This will allow publication and maintainence of several different versions of a text. In some respects, this will be similar to publishing a college or paperback edition of the text established in a critical edition. In addition to this, the user of a text published through such a system can subscribe to later changes or corrections of an edition. The architectural model proposed in this paper tries to contribute to a fundamental protocol that could form the base for applications serving the long-term needs of research and scholarship.

        | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap |

        Be Sociable, Share!

          eBook Use and Acceptance in an Undergraduate Institution

          Posted in E-Books, Electronic Resources, Publishing, Reports and White Papers on March 19th, 2013

          Springer has released eBook Use and Acceptance in an Undergraduate Institution.

          Here's an excerpt :

          The survey finds high use of eBooks at Wellesley College, with 70% of the respondents indicating they have used eBooks. Other recent international surveys of eBook use have shown 52-64% of students or faculty responding that they have used eBooks (Figure 10). Within the general U.S. population 21% of adults reported having used eBooks in 2011. Some eBook use by Wellesley students and faculty may be non-academic, leisure reading, but half of Wellesley's eBook users report having used eBooks from the Wellesley College Library's collection.

          | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap |

          Be Sociable, Share!

            The Thinkpiece "Libraries, eLending, and the Future of Public Access to Digital Content"

            Posted in Copyright, E-Books, Licenses, Reports and White Papers on February 20th, 2013

            IFLA has released The Thinkpiece "Libraries, eLending, and the Future of Public Access to Digital Content".

            Here's an excerpt:

            In October 2012 IFLA therefore commissioned an independent consultant, Civic Agenda, to prepare a 'thinkpiece' to inform discussion at a meeting of experts from the library and publishing sector. This meeting took place over three days at IFLA Headquarters in The Hague in November 2012. The thinkpiece was the starting point for discussions on desirable characteristics for public access models for library digital content, library user expectations' regarding eBooks, and the relationship between libraries and publishers in the eBook age. During the meeting participants focused on the role of copyright, licensing and legislation in access to digital content like eBooks, as well as reviewing advocacy campaigns and the potential for IFLA as an advocate for library access to eBooks.

            | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 ( paperback and PDF file; over 3,800 entries) | Digital Scholarship |

            Be Sociable, Share!

              "The Authors Guild v. Hathitrust: A Way Forward for Digital Access to Neglected Works in Libraries"

              Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Books, Mass Digitizaton, Publishing on January 30th, 2013

              James Aaron has self-archived "The Authors Guild v. Hathitrust: A Way Forward for Digital Access to Neglected Works in Libraries" in SSRN.

              Here's an excerpt:

              This Comment begins by describing the HathiTrust Orphan Works Project and what it renames the neglected works problem. Next, it examines the legality of the project under current copyright law, focusing mainly on fair use under section 107, and concludes that it is unclear whether the project violates copyright law. Finally it analyzes whether this result fits the policy goals of copyright, and because it does not, proposes both legislative and judicial changes to copyright law to make it clear that in the proper circumstances, nonprofit, educational uses of neglected works do not violate copyright law.

              | Google Books Bibliography (XHTML website; over 320 entries) | Digital Scholarship |

              Be Sociable, Share!

                EBook Business Models: A Scorecard for Public Libraries

                Posted in E-Books, Electronic Resources, Licenses, Publishing, Scholarly Books on January 28th, 2013

                ALA's Digital Content and Libraries Working Group has released EBook Business Models: A Scorecard for Public Libraries.

                Here's an excerpt:

                The Digital Content & Libraries Working Group (DCWG) began documenting and describing attributes of various licensing arrangements libraries may have with publishers in the August 2012 report Ebook Business Models for Public Libraries. Now we are pleased to share The Ebook Business Model Scorecard, which more fully examines the variables often seen in ebook license agreements or contracts. At the same time, the variables, when considered as a whole, can help libraries conceptualize licenses holistically instead of fixating on one aspect of a contract in isolation.

                | Google Books Bibliography (XHTML website; over 320 entries) | Digital Scholarship |

                Be Sociable, Share!

                  "Who’s Tracking Your Reading Habits? An E-Book Buyer’s Guide to Privacy, 2012 Edition"

                  Posted in E-Books, Privacy, Publishing, Reports and White Papers on November 30th, 2012

                  The EFF has released "Who's Tracking Your Reading Habits? An E-Book Buyer's Guide to Privacy, 2012 Edition."

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  As we've done since 2009, again we've taken some of the most popular e-book platforms and combed through their privacy policies for answers to common privacy questions that users deserve to know. In many cases, these answers were frustratingly vague and long-winded. In nearly all cases, reading e-books means giving up more privacy than browsing through a physical bookstore or library, or reading a paper book in your own home. Here, we've examined the policies of Google Books, Amazon Kindle, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo, Sony, Overdrive, Indiebound, Internet Archive, and Adobe Content Server for answers to the following questions:

                  • Can they keep track of searches for books?
                  • Can they monitor what you're reading and how you're reading it after purchase and link that information back to you? Can they do that when the e-book is obtained elsewhere?
                  • What compatibility does the device have with books not purchased from an associated eBook store?
                  • Do they keep a record of book purchases? Can they track book purchases or acquisitions made from other sources?
                  • With whom can they share the information collected in non-aggregated form?
                  • Do they have mechanisms for customers to access, correct, or delete the information?
                  • Can they share information outside the company without the customer's consent?

                  | Digital Scholarship's Digital/Print Books | Digital Scholarship |

                  Be Sociable, Share!

                    Authors Guild et al. v. Google: "Brief of Amici Curiae Academic Authors in Support of Defendant-Appellant and Reversal"

                    Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Books, Google and Other Search Engines, Mass Digitizaton, Publishing on November 20th, 2012

                    Pamela Samuelson and David R. Hansen have self-archived "Brief of Amici Curiae Academic Authors in Support of Defendant-Appellant and Reversal" in SSRN.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    Summary of argument: Class certification was improperly granted below because the District Court failed to conduct a rigorous analysis of the adequacy of representation factor, as Rule 23(a)(4) requires. The three individual plaintiffs who claim to be class representatives are not academics and do not share the commitment to broad access to knowledge that predominates among academics. . . .

                    Academic authors desire broad public access to their works such as that which the Google Books project provides. Although the District Court held that the plaintiffs had inadequately represented the interests of academic authors in relation to the proposed settlement, it failed to recognize that pursuit of this litigation would be even more adverse to the interests of academic authors than the proposed settlement was. . . .

                    In short, a "win" in this case for the class representatives would be a "loss" for academic authors. It is precisely this kind of conflict that courts have long recognized should prevent class certification due to inadequate representation. The District Court failed to adequately address this fundamental conflict in its certification order, though it was well aware of the conflict through submissions and objections received from the settlement fairness hearing through to the hearings on the most recent class certification motions. Because of that failure, the order certifying the class should be reversed

                    | Google Books Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

                    Be Sociable, Share!

                      DOAB User Needs Analysis—Final Report

                      Posted in E-Books, Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers on November 19th, 2012

                      The Directory of Open Access Books has released the DOAB User Needs Analysis—Final Report.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      This final evaluation and recommendation report is based on the user experiences, needs, and expectations as they emerged from the qualitative components (survey, workshop and online discussion platform) that were used to conduct the DOAB User Needs Analysis. This final public report, intended for the wider academic and publishing community, aims to advise in the establishment of procedures, criteria and standards concerning the set-up and functioning of the DOAB platform and service and to devise guidelines and recommendations for admissions to DOAB and for its further development, sustainability and implementation.

                      Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography Cover

                      | Digital Scholarship |

                      Be Sociable, Share!

                        Books at JSTOR Launches

                        Posted in E-Books, Publishing, Scholarly Books on November 15th, 2012

                        JSTOR has launched Books at JSTOR.

                        Here's an excerpt from the press release:

                        JSTOR is pleased to announce the launch of its new books program, Books at JSTOR, which brings scholarly monographs from leading university presses and other academic publishers to the JSTOR platform. Books are deeply integrated with the 1,600 current and archival journals on JSTOR. All content is cross-searchable, and books are linked with millions of book reviews and from hundreds of thousands of book citations within the journal literature.

                        | Digital Scholarship's Digital/Print Books | Digital Scholarship |

                        Be Sociable, Share!

                          Page 3 of 2812345...1020...Last »

                          DigitalKoans

                          DigitalKoans

                          Digital Scholarship

                          Copyright © 2005-2016 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

                          Creative Commons License
                          This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license.