Archive for the 'Electronic Resources' Category

New LIBLICENSE Model License Agreement

Posted in Electronic Resources, Licenses on December 8th, 2014

The Center for Research Libraries and others have released a new LIBLICENSE Model License Agreement.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The model license outlines the main provisions a good library e-resources content license should contain, highlighting as well key points for decisions and negotiations with publishers. The document is expected to support libraries' efforts to serve their users and achieve the core mission of preserving intellectual heritage in the digital age by negotiating the best terms of use. The original LIBLICENSE model license, released in 2001, has supported long-term access and stewardship goals; the new revision will help librarians address a new generation of issues and challenges.

Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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    Discovery Services: A White Paper for the Texas State Library & Archives Commission

    Posted in Electronic Resources, OPACs/Discovery Systems on November 20th, 2014

    The Texas State Library and Archives Commission has released Discovery Services: A White Paper for the Texas State Library & Archives Commission.

    Here's an excerpt:

    Discussions among libraries that have recently implemented discovery services are likely to result in agreement that implementation was challenging. However, once implemented, librarians are generally happy with their decisions to offer discovery services to their patrons. Based on librarian experiences of both the challenges and rewards of implementing a discovery service, the Texas State Library and Archives Commission (TSLAC) contracted with Amigos Library Services to write a white paper that would include basic information concerning discovery services, as well as an overview of the major discovery vendors.

    Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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      Does Discovery Still Happen in the Library? Roles and Strategies for a Shifting Reality

      Posted in Electronic Resources, ERM/Discovery Systems, Research Libraries on September 26th, 2014

      ITHAKA S+R. has released Does Discovery Still Happen in the Library? Roles and Strategies for a Shifting Reality.

      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

      In this Issue Brief, Roger Schonfeld explores how the vision that the library should be the starting point for research-a vision many library directors hold-is often in conflict with the practices of faculty and students. As users migrate to other starting points, librarians could invest in ways to bring them back. But there is also an opportunity for librarians to re-think their role and perhaps pursue a different vision altogether.

      Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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        Open Discovery Initiative: Promoting Transparency in Discovery

        Posted in Electronic Resources on June 30th, 2014

        NISO has released Open Discovery Initiative: Promoting Transparency in Discovery.

        Here's an excerpt:

        Based on the input from a survey done early in the project (see 2.7), the ODI group agreed to develop recommended practices in the following areas:

        Technical recommendations for data format and data transfer, including method of delivery and ongoing updates.

        1. Recommendations for the communication (automated or through reporting) of libraries' rights to distribute or display specific content (e.g., restricted to subscribers versus open to all users). These recommendations are to include technical specifications on how data will be exchanged and procedural specifications regarding update frequency and other logistical details.
        2. Clear descriptors regarding the level of indexing performed for each item or collection of content and the level of availability of the content.
        3. Definition of fair linking from discovery service to the published content.
        4. Determination of what usage statistics should be collected, for whom, and how these data should
        5. be disseminated.

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          "Four Facets of Privacy and Intellectual Freedom in Licensing Contracts for Electronic Journals"

          Posted in Electronic Resources, Libraries, Licenses, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 8th, 2014

          College & Research Libraries has released an eprint of "Four Facets of Privacy and Intellectual Freedom in Licensing Contracts for Electronic Journals."

          Here's an excerpt:

          This is a study of the treatment of library patron privacy in licenses for electronic journals in academic libraries. We begin by distinguishing four facets of privacy and intellectual freedom based on the LIS and philosophical literature. Next, we perform a content analysis of 42 license agreements for electronic journals, focusing on terms for enforcing authorized use and collection and sharing of user data. We compare our findings to model licenses, to recommendations proposed in a recent treatise on licenses, and to our account of the four facets of intellectual freedom. We find important conflicts with each.

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            "A Comparison of E-book and Print Book Discovery, Preferences, and Usage by Science and Engineering Faculty and Graduate Students at the University of Kansas"

            Posted in E-Books, Electronic Resources, Scholarly Books on April 7th, 2014

            Julie Waters et al. have published "A Comparison of E-book and Print Book Discovery, Preferences, and Usage by Science and Engineering Faculty and Graduate Students at the University of Kansas" in Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship.

            Here's an excerpt:

            The availability of science and technology e-books through the University of Kansas Libraries is growing rapidly through approval plans, e-book packages, and electronic demand-driven acquisitions. Based on informal conversations with faculty, questions still lingered as to the acceptance of books in the electronic format by faculty and graduate students in the STEM disciplines. To learn more about book format preferences, a survey was distributed via e-mail to 1,898 faculty and graduate students in science and technology at the University of Kansas. The survey included questions focused on print book use, e-book use, format preferences, and demographics. A majority of the 357 respondents indicated a preference for print books indicating many of the oft-repeated comments about the disadvantages of reading books on a computer. Patrons using tablets were more inclined to access e-books. The survey indicated a continuing need to purchase books in both print and electronic formats, and to market the availability of e-books to University of Kansas patrons.

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              "Unwrapping the Bundle: An Examination of Research Libraries and the ‘Big Deal’"

              Posted in Electronic Resources, Licenses, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 17th, 2014

              Karla L. Strieb and Julia C. Blixrud have self-archived "Unwrapping the Bundle: An Examination of Research Libraries and the 'Big Deal'."

              Here's an excerpt:

              This study presents and analyzes the findings of a 2012 survey of member libraries belonging to the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) on publishers' large journal bundles and compares the results to earlier surveys. The data illuminate five research questions: market penetration, journal bundle construction, collection format shifts, pricing models, and license terms. The structure of the product is still immature, particularly in defining content and developing sustainable pricing models. The typical "bundle" is something less than the full publishers list. Neither market studies nor market forces have produced a sustainable new strategy for pricing and selling e-journals. Finally, a complex history of managing license terms is revealed in the data.

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                E-Reading Rises as Device Ownership Jumps

                Posted in E-Books, Electronic Resources, Publishing, Reports and White Papers on January 17th, 2014

                The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released E-Reading Rises as Device Ownership Jumps.

                Here's an excerpt:

                The percentage of adults who read an e-book in the past year has risen to 28%, up from 23% at the end of 2012. At the same time, about seven in ten Americans reported reading a book in print, up four percentage points after a slight dip in 2012, and 14% of adults listened to an audiobook.

                Though e-books are rising in popularity, print remains the foundation of Americans' reading habits. Most people who read e-books also read print books, and just 4% of readers are "e-book only." Audiobook listeners have the most diverse reading habits overall, while fewer print readers consume books in other formats.

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