Archive for the 'Emerging Technologies' Category

"Blockchain Technology as a Regulatory Technology: From Code Is Law to Law Is Code"

Posted in Copyright, Emerging Technologies on December 7th, 2016

Primavera De Filippi and Samer Hassan have published "Blockchain Technology as a Regulatory Technology: From Code Is Law to Law Is Code" in First Monday.

Here's an excerpt:

To illustrate the extent to which blockchain code can assume the function of law, let us take the example of a hypothetical blockchain-based DRM system. Copyright law introduces "artificial scarcity" in the realm of information, by prohibiting (or constraining) the reproduction of creative works without the consent of the corresponding right holders. Yet, given the ease with which one can produce an identical copy of a digital work, copyright infringement has become widespread in the digital world. Since many years already, content providers have been relying on technological means (such as DRM systems, or other technological measures of protection) to restrain the way in which content can be accessed, used or reused by introducing a new set of technical rules, as a complement to the legal provisions of copyright law. Yet, most of these systems are limited by the fact that it is impossible to distinguish one digital file from another. By leveraging on the transparency and immutability of blockchain technologies, it is possible to restore the unicity and transferability of digital works, by linking every digital copy to a particular token on the blockchain. Authors can then associate these tokens with a particular set of rights to their digital works and trade them in the same way as they would trade digital tokens. Blockchain technology can thus be used to implement "artificial scarcity" at the level of each individual file—thus potentially allowing for the reintroduction of the first sale doctrine [11] in the digital realm, without the need to rely on any contractual or legal means.

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Internet of Things (IoT) Security and Privacy Recommendations

Posted in Emerging Technologies, Reports and White Papers on December 2nd, 2016

The Broadband Internet Technical Advisory Group has released the Internet of Things (IoT) Security and Privacy Recommendations.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The emergence of IoT presents opportunities for significant innovation, from smart homes to smart cities. In many cases, straightforward changes to device development, distribution, and maintenance processes can prevent the distribution of IoT devices that suffer from significant security and privacy issues. BITAG believes that following the guidelines outlined in this report may dramatically improve the security and privacy of IoT devices and minimize the costs associated with the collateral damage that would otherwise affect both end users and ISPs.

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The Internet of Things: A UKeiG White Paper

Posted in Emerging Technologies, Reports and White Papers on July 15th, 2016

UKeiG has released The Internet of Things: A UKeiG White Paper .

Here's an excerpt:

This White Paper presents an overview of some of the key issues surrounding the development and deployment of the collection of technologies commonly referred to as the Internet of Things (IoT).

The technological underpinnings of the IoT are discussed in the context of a rapidly developing new field of technology and with an acknowledgement that there is some way to go before commonly accepted standards are agreed upon and that the commercial case, particularly in the domestic sphere, for the IoT is yet to be made.

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NMC Horizon Report > 2016 Higher Education Edition

Posted in Emerging Technologies, Reports and White Papers on February 5th, 2016

The New Media Consortium and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative have released NMC Horizon Report > 2016 Higher Education Edition.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The report identifies six key trends, six significant challenges, and six important developments in educational technology across three adoption horizons spanning over the next one to five years, giving campus leaders, educational technologists, and faculty a valuable guide for strategic technology planning. The report provides higher education leaders with in-depth insight into how trends and challenges are accelerating and impeding the adoption of educational technology, along with their implications for policy, leadership, and practice.

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"How to Use Crowdsourcing Effectively: Guidelines and Examples"

Posted in Emerging Technologies, Research Libraries on December 1st, 2015

Elena Simperl has published "How to Use Crowdsourcing Effectively: Guidelines and Examples" in LIBER Quarterly.

Here's an excerpt:

Crowdsourcing has become the mot du jour when it comes to resolving any types of problems, online or offline, that require sustained human involvement. We see it applied in order to motivate employees to engage with less rewarding daily routines, to attract the best possible ideas and approaches to boost innovation, or to complete data processing tasks that computing technology has yet to master quickly and accurately.

In this paper we look at its various forms and flavors, from gamification to human computation and grand challenges, and discuss how it could be used to turn conventional content management applications into social machines in which tasks are performed as optimal combinations of human and computational intelligence. We introduce a framework for the analysis of the most important building blocks of such systems, as well as design and participation best practices that should guide their development.

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"What Technology Skills Do Developers Need? A Text Analysis of Job Listings in Library and Information Science (LIS) from Jobs.code4lib.org"

Posted in Digital Libraries, Emerging Technologies, Research Libraries on September 25th, 2015

Monica Maceli has published "What Technology Skills Do Developers Need? A Text Analysis of Job Listings in Library and Information Science (LIS) from Jobs.code4lib.org " in Information Technology and Libraries.

Here's an excerpt:

Technology plays an indisputably vital role in library and information science (LIS) work; this rapidly moving landscape can create challenges for practitioners and educators seeking to keep pace with such change. In pursuit of building our understanding of currently sought technology competencies in developer-oriented positions within LIS, this paper reports the results of a text analysis of a large collection of job listings culled from the Code4lib jobs website. Beginning over a decade ago as a popular mailing list covering the intersection of technology and library work, the Code4lib organization's current offerings include a website that collects and organizes LIS-related technology job listings. The results of the text analysis of this dataset suggest the currently vital technology skills and concepts that existing and aspiring practitioners may target in their continuing education as developers.

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"Using Vine to Disseminate Library Information: A Practical Guide"

Posted in Emerging Technologies on September 22nd, 2015

Antony Groves has published "Using Vine to Disseminate Library Information: A Practical Guide" in the LSE Impact Blog.

Here's an excerpt:

There are a number of blog posts recommending Vine to librarians, featuring some excellent examples of how the app is being used by libraries . . . Despite this, Vine remains an under-used tool. One reason for this may be the absence of a clear guide on how to use Vine. The following article intends to address this issue by equipping practitioners with a short guide to creating Vines. It will begin by introducing Vine, explaining what it is and why it should be considered when promoting certain aspects of the Library. This will be followed by a five-step guide to creating Vines on Android devices and iPhones.

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Rapid Fabrication/Makerspace Services, SPEC Kit 348

Posted in ARL Libraries, Emerging Technologies, Research Libraries on September 11th, 2015

ARL has released Rapid Fabrication/Makerspace Services, SPEC Kit 348.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

ARL has released Rapid Fabrication/Makerspace Services, SPEC Kit 348, an exploration of current ARL member library engagement with 3-D printing, rapid fabrication and digitization technologies, and makerspaces. This study covers the types of services libraries offer, the location of these services, the hardware and software that is available for users, service hours and staffing, user outreach and training, budget and funding, and evaluation of the services.

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NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Library Edition

Posted in Emerging Technologies, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries on September 2nd, 2015

The New Media Consortium has released the NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Library Edition.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

What is on the five-year horizon for academic and research libraries? The NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Library Edition examines key trends, significant challenges, and important developments in technology for their impact on academic and research libraries worldwide.

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NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Higher Education Edition

Posted in Emerging Technologies, Reports and White Papers on February 11th, 2015

The NMC and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative have released the NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Higher Education Edition.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

This 12th edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in education. Six key trends, six significant challenges, and six important developments in educational technology are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years, giving campus leaders and practitioners a valuable guide for strategic technology planning. The report aims to provide these leaders with more in-depth insight into how the trends and challenges are accelerating and impeding the adoption of educational technology, along with their implications for policy, leadership and practice.

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"The Social, Political and Legal Aspects of Text and Data Mining (TDM)"

Posted in Copyright, Emerging Technologies, Publishing on November 17th, 2014

Michelle Brook, Peter Murray-Rust, and Charles Oppenheim have published "The Social, Political and Legal Aspects of Text and Data Mining (TDM)" in D-Lib Magazine.

Here's an excerpt:

The ideas of textual or data mining (TDM) and subsequent analysis go back hundreds if not thousands of years. Originally carried out manually, textual and data analysis has long been a tool which has enabled new insights to be drawn from text corpora. However, for the potential benefits of TDM to be unlocked, a number of non-technological barriers need to be overcome. These include legal uncertainty resulting from complicated copyright, database rights and licensing, the fact that some publishers are not currently embracing the opportunities TDM offers the academic community, and a lack of awareness of TDM among many academics, alongside a skills gap.

Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

Killer Apps in the Gigabit Age

Posted in Digital Culture, Emerging Technologies on October 13th, 2014

The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released Killer Apps in the Gigabit Age.

Here's an excerpt:

To explore the possibilities of the next leap in connectivity we asked thousands of experts and Internet builders to share their thoughts about likely new Internet activities and applications that might emerge in the gigabit age. We call this a canvassing because it is not a representative, randomized survey. Its findings emerge from an "opt in" invitation to experts, many of whom play active roles in Internet evolution as technology builders, researchers, managers, policymakers, marketers, and analysts. We also invited comments from those who have made insightful predictions to our previous queries about the future of the Internet.

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