Archive for the 'Emerging Technologies' Category

NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Higher Education Edition

Posted in Emerging Technologies, Reports and White Papers on February 11th, 2015

The NMC and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative have released the NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Higher Education Edition.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

This 12th edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in education. Six key trends, six significant challenges, and six important developments in educational technology are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years, giving campus leaders and practitioners a valuable guide for strategic technology planning. The report aims to provide these leaders with more in-depth insight into how the trends and challenges are accelerating and impeding the adoption of educational technology, along with their implications for policy, leadership and practice.

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    "The Social, Political and Legal Aspects of Text and Data Mining (TDM)"

    Posted in Copyright, Emerging Technologies, Publishing on November 17th, 2014

    Michelle Brook, Peter Murray-Rust, and Charles Oppenheim have published "The Social, Political and Legal Aspects of Text and Data Mining (TDM)" in D-Lib Magazine.

    Here's an excerpt:

    The ideas of textual or data mining (TDM) and subsequent analysis go back hundreds if not thousands of years. Originally carried out manually, textual and data analysis has long been a tool which has enabled new insights to be drawn from text corpora. However, for the potential benefits of TDM to be unlocked, a number of non-technological barriers need to be overcome. These include legal uncertainty resulting from complicated copyright, database rights and licensing, the fact that some publishers are not currently embracing the opportunities TDM offers the academic community, and a lack of awareness of TDM among many academics, alongside a skills gap.

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      Killer Apps in the Gigabit Age

      Posted in Digital Culture, Emerging Technologies on October 13th, 2014

      The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released Killer Apps in the Gigabit Age.

      Here's an excerpt:

      To explore the possibilities of the next leap in connectivity we asked thousands of experts and Internet builders to share their thoughts about likely new Internet activities and applications that might emerge in the gigabit age. We call this a canvassing because it is not a representative, randomized survey. Its findings emerge from an "opt in" invitation to experts, many of whom play active roles in Internet evolution as technology builders, researchers, managers, policymakers, marketers, and analysts. We also invited comments from those who have made insightful predictions to our previous queries about the future of the Internet.

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        NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Library Edition

        Posted in Emerging Technologies, Libraries, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries on August 22nd, 2014

        NMC has released the NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Library Edition.

        Here’s an excerpt from the press release:

        The NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Library Edition, examines key trends, significant challenges, and emerging technologies for their potential impact on academic and research libraries worldwide. While there are many local factors affecting libraries, there are also issues that transcend regional boundaries and common questions; it was with these questions in mind that this report was created.

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          Alcatel-Lucent Transmits 10 GBS on Copper Telephone Lines

          Posted in Emerging Technologies on July 10th, 2014

          Alcatel-Lucent has announced that it has transmitted 10 GBS over copper wires.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          Bell Labs, the research arm of Alcatel-Lucent (Euronext Paris and NYSE: ALU), has set a new broadband speed record of 10 gigabits-per-second (Gbps) using traditional copper telephone lines and a prototype technology that demonstrates how existing copper access networks can be used to deliver 1Gbps symmetrical ultra-broadband access services. . . .

          The Bell Labs tests used a prototype technology called XG-FAST. This is an extension of G.fast technology, a new broadband standard currently being finalized by the ITU. When it becomes commercially available in 2015, G.fast will use a frequency range for data transmission of 106 MHz, giving broadband speeds up to 500 Mbps over a distance of 100 meters. In contrast, XG-FAST uses an increased frequency range up to 500 MHz to achieve higher speeds but over shorter distances. Bell Labs achieved 1 Gbps symmetrical over 70 meters on a single copper pair. 10 Gbps was achieved over a distance of 30 meters by using two pairs of lines (a technique known as "bonding"). Both tests used standard copper cable provided by a European operator.

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            "The ‘Digital’ Scholarship Disconnect"

            Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Humanities, Emerging Technologies, Research Libraries on June 17th, 2014

            Clifford Lynch has published "The 'Digital' Scholarship Disconnect" in EDUCAUSE Review.

            Here's an excerpt:

            Still, in all of these examples of digital scholarship, a key challenge remains: How can we curate and manage data now that so much of it is being produced and collected in digital form? How can we ensure that it will be discovered, shared, and reused to advance scholarship? We are struggling through the establishment of institutions, funding models, policies and practices, and even new legal requirements and community norms—ranging from cultural changes about who can use data (and when) to economic decisions about who should pay for what. Some disciplines are less contentious than others: for example, astronomy data is technically well-understood and usually not terribly sensitive. Reputation, rather than commercial reward, is wrapped up in astronomical discoveries, and there is no institutional review board to ensure the safety and dignity of astronomical objects. On the other hand, human subjects and their data raise an enormous number of questions about informed consent, privacy, and anonymization; when there are genetic markers or possible treatments to be discovered or validated, serious high-value commercial interests may be at stake. All of these factors tend to work against the free and convenient sharing of data.

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              "The University Library as Incubator for Digital Scholarship"

              Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Humanities, Emerging Technologies, Research Libraries on June 17th, 2014

              Bryan Sinclair has published "The University Library as Incubator for Digital Scholarship" in EDUCAUSE Review.

              Here's an excerpt:

              The campus of the future will be increasingly connected and collaborative, and the library can be the community center and beta test kitchen for new forms of interdisciplinary inquiry. Libraries have always been in the business of knowledge creation and transfer, and the digital scholarship incubator within the library can serve as a natural extension of this essential function. In an age of visualization, analytics, big data, and new forms of online publishing, these central spaces can facilitate knowledge creation and transfer by connecting people, data, and technology in a shared collaborative space.

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                The Internet of Things Will Thrive by 2025

                Posted in Digital Culture, Emerging Technologies, Reports and White Papers on May 15th, 2014

                The Pew Research Center has released The Internet of Things Will Thrive by 2025.

                Here's an excerpt:

                This current report is an analysis of opinions about the likely expansion of the Internet of Things (sometimes called the Cloud of Things), a catchall phrase for the array of devices, appliances, vehicles, wearable material, and sensor-laden parts of the environment that connect to each other and feed data back and forth. It covers the over 1,600 responses that were offered specifically about our question about where the Internet of Things would stand by the year 2025. The report is the next in a series of eight Pew Research and Elon University analyses to be issued this year in which experts will share their expectations about the future of such things as privacy, cybersecurity, and net neutrality. It includes some of the best and most provocative of the predictions survey respondents made when specifically asked to share their views about the evolution of embedded and wearable computing and the Internet of Things.

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                  Big Data: Seizing Opportunities, Preserving Values

                  Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Emerging Technologies on May 6th, 2014

                  The Executive Office of the President has released Big Data: Seizing Opportunities, Preserving Values.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  On January 17, in a speech at the Justice Department about reforming the United States' signals intelligence practices, President Obama tasked his Counselor John Podesta with leading a comprehensive review of the impact big data technologies are having, and will have, on a range of economic, social, and government activities. Podesta was joined in this effort by Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker, Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, the President's Science Advisor John Holdren, the President's Economic Advisor Jeffrey Zients, and other senior government officials. The President's Council of Advisors for Science & Technology conducted a parallel report to take measure of the underlying technologies. Their findings underpin many of the technological assertions in this report.

                  This review was conceived as fundamentally a scoping exercise. Over 90 days, the review group engaged with academic experts, industry representatives, privacy advocates, civil rights groups, law enforcement agents, and other government agencies. The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy jointly organized three university conferences, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, New York University, and the University of California, Berkeley. The White House Office of Science & Technology Policy also issued a "Request for Information" seeking public comment on issues of big data and privacy and received more than 70 responses. In addition, the WhiteHouse.gov platform was used to conduct an unscientific survey of public attitudes about different uses of big data and various big data technologies. A list of the working group's activities can be found in the Appendix.

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                    Digital Life in 2025

                    Posted in Digital Culture, Emerging Technologies on March 14th, 2014

                    The Pew Research Center has released Digital Life in 2025.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    To a notable extent, the experts agree on the technology change that lies ahead, even as they disagree about its ramifications. Most believe there will be:

                    • A global, immersive, invisible, ambient networked computing environment built through the continued proliferation of smart sensors, cameras, software, databases, and massive data centers in a world-spanning information fabric known as the Internet of Things.
                    • "Augmented reality" enhancements to the real-world input that people perceive through the use of portable/wearable/implantable technologies.
                    • Disruption of business models established in the 20 th century (most notably impacting finance, entertainment, publishers of all sorts, and education).
                    • Tagging, databasing, and intelligent analytical mapping of the physical and social realms.

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                      MOOC Content Licensing Solution Launched

                      Posted in Copyright, Emerging Technologies, Publishing on March 10th, 2014

                      The Copyright Clearance Center has Launched the MOOC Content Licensing Solution.

                      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                      The MOOC Content Licensing Solution uses the current per-page or per-article academic-based pricing rightsholders have established through CCC's Electronic Course Content pay-per-use service. CCC offers digital rights from over 5,000 rightsholders around the world to public, private not-for-profit, and private for-profit U.S.-based institutions of higher education that conduct academic MOOCs.

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                        "Keeping Up With… Augmented Reality"

                        Posted in Emerging Technologies, Libraries on February 25th, 2014

                        ACRL has released "Keeping Up With… Augmented Reality."

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        At a minimum, libraries will need to be prepared to support augmented reality if and when it becomes more prevalent in textbooks and other print materials. But, while these materials are certainly relevant to the work of academic libraries, there are also several interesting library-specific augmented reality tools in use at various institutions. ShelvAR, developed by the Miami University Library, is an excellent example of how augmented reality can increase the efficiency of libraries' existing workflows. Available for use with any iOS or Android device with a camera, this app can scan any tagged library materials and overlay a red X over any item that is out of place on the shelf.

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