Archive for the 'Emerging Technologies' Category

NMC Horizon Report > 2016 Higher Education Edition

Posted in Emerging Technologies, Reports and White Papers on February 5th, 2016

The New Media Consortium and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative have released NMC Horizon Report > 2016 Higher Education Edition.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The report identifies six key trends, six significant challenges, and six important developments in educational technology across three adoption horizons spanning over the next one to five years, giving campus leaders, educational technologists, and faculty a valuable guide for strategic technology planning. The report provides higher education leaders with in-depth insight into how trends and challenges are accelerating and impeding the adoption of educational technology, along with their implications for policy, leadership, and practice.

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    "How to Use Crowdsourcing Effectively: Guidelines and Examples"

    Posted in Emerging Technologies, Research Libraries on December 1st, 2015

    Elena Simperl has published "How to Use Crowdsourcing Effectively: Guidelines and Examples" in LIBER Quarterly.

    Here's an excerpt:

    Crowdsourcing has become the mot du jour when it comes to resolving any types of problems, online or offline, that require sustained human involvement. We see it applied in order to motivate employees to engage with less rewarding daily routines, to attract the best possible ideas and approaches to boost innovation, or to complete data processing tasks that computing technology has yet to master quickly and accurately.

    In this paper we look at its various forms and flavors, from gamification to human computation and grand challenges, and discuss how it could be used to turn conventional content management applications into social machines in which tasks are performed as optimal combinations of human and computational intelligence. We introduce a framework for the analysis of the most important building blocks of such systems, as well as design and participation best practices that should guide their development.

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      "What Technology Skills Do Developers Need? A Text Analysis of Job Listings in Library and Information Science (LIS) from Jobs.code4lib.org"

      Posted in Digital Libraries, Emerging Technologies, Research Libraries on September 25th, 2015

      Monica Maceli has published "What Technology Skills Do Developers Need? A Text Analysis of Job Listings in Library and Information Science (LIS) from Jobs.code4lib.org " in Information Technology and Libraries.

      Here's an excerpt:

      Technology plays an indisputably vital role in library and information science (LIS) work; this rapidly moving landscape can create challenges for practitioners and educators seeking to keep pace with such change. In pursuit of building our understanding of currently sought technology competencies in developer-oriented positions within LIS, this paper reports the results of a text analysis of a large collection of job listings culled from the Code4lib jobs website. Beginning over a decade ago as a popular mailing list covering the intersection of technology and library work, the Code4lib organization's current offerings include a website that collects and organizes LIS-related technology job listings. The results of the text analysis of this dataset suggest the currently vital technology skills and concepts that existing and aspiring practitioners may target in their continuing education as developers.

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        "Using Vine to Disseminate Library Information: A Practical Guide"

        Posted in Emerging Technologies on September 22nd, 2015

        Antony Groves has published "Using Vine to Disseminate Library Information: A Practical Guide" in the LSE Impact Blog.

        Here's an excerpt:

        There are a number of blog posts recommending Vine to librarians, featuring some excellent examples of how the app is being used by libraries . . . Despite this, Vine remains an under-used tool. One reason for this may be the absence of a clear guide on how to use Vine. The following article intends to address this issue by equipping practitioners with a short guide to creating Vines. It will begin by introducing Vine, explaining what it is and why it should be considered when promoting certain aspects of the Library. This will be followed by a five-step guide to creating Vines on Android devices and iPhones.

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          Rapid Fabrication/Makerspace Services, SPEC Kit 348

          Posted in ARL Libraries, Emerging Technologies, Research Libraries on September 11th, 2015

          ARL has released Rapid Fabrication/Makerspace Services, SPEC Kit 348.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          ARL has released Rapid Fabrication/Makerspace Services, SPEC Kit 348, an exploration of current ARL member library engagement with 3-D printing, rapid fabrication and digitization technologies, and makerspaces. This study covers the types of services libraries offer, the location of these services, the hardware and software that is available for users, service hours and staffing, user outreach and training, budget and funding, and evaluation of the services.

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            NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Library Edition

            Posted in Emerging Technologies, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries on September 2nd, 2015

            The New Media Consortium has released the NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Library Edition.

            Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

            What is on the five-year horizon for academic and research libraries? The NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Library Edition examines key trends, significant challenges, and important developments in technology for their impact on academic and research libraries worldwide.

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              NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Higher Education Edition

              Posted in Emerging Technologies, Reports and White Papers on February 11th, 2015

              The NMC and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative have released the NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Higher Education Edition.

              Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

              This 12th edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in education. Six key trends, six significant challenges, and six important developments in educational technology are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years, giving campus leaders and practitioners a valuable guide for strategic technology planning. The report aims to provide these leaders with more in-depth insight into how the trends and challenges are accelerating and impeding the adoption of educational technology, along with their implications for policy, leadership and practice.

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                "The Social, Political and Legal Aspects of Text and Data Mining (TDM)"

                Posted in Copyright, Emerging Technologies, Publishing on November 17th, 2014

                Michelle Brook, Peter Murray-Rust, and Charles Oppenheim have published "The Social, Political and Legal Aspects of Text and Data Mining (TDM)" in D-Lib Magazine.

                Here's an excerpt:

                The ideas of textual or data mining (TDM) and subsequent analysis go back hundreds if not thousands of years. Originally carried out manually, textual and data analysis has long been a tool which has enabled new insights to be drawn from text corpora. However, for the potential benefits of TDM to be unlocked, a number of non-technological barriers need to be overcome. These include legal uncertainty resulting from complicated copyright, database rights and licensing, the fact that some publishers are not currently embracing the opportunities TDM offers the academic community, and a lack of awareness of TDM among many academics, alongside a skills gap.

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                  Killer Apps in the Gigabit Age

                  Posted in Digital Culture, Emerging Technologies on October 13th, 2014

                  The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released Killer Apps in the Gigabit Age.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  To explore the possibilities of the next leap in connectivity we asked thousands of experts and Internet builders to share their thoughts about likely new Internet activities and applications that might emerge in the gigabit age. We call this a canvassing because it is not a representative, randomized survey. Its findings emerge from an "opt in" invitation to experts, many of whom play active roles in Internet evolution as technology builders, researchers, managers, policymakers, marketers, and analysts. We also invited comments from those who have made insightful predictions to our previous queries about the future of the Internet.

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                    NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Library Edition

                    Posted in Emerging Technologies, Libraries, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries on August 22nd, 2014

                    NMC has released the NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Library Edition.

                    Here’s an excerpt from the press release:

                    The NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Library Edition, examines key trends, significant challenges, and emerging technologies for their potential impact on academic and research libraries worldwide. While there are many local factors affecting libraries, there are also issues that transcend regional boundaries and common questions; it was with these questions in mind that this report was created.

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                      Alcatel-Lucent Transmits 10 GBS on Copper Telephone Lines

                      Posted in Emerging Technologies on July 10th, 2014

                      Alcatel-Lucent has announced that it has transmitted 10 GBS over copper wires.

                      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                      Bell Labs, the research arm of Alcatel-Lucent (Euronext Paris and NYSE: ALU), has set a new broadband speed record of 10 gigabits-per-second (Gbps) using traditional copper telephone lines and a prototype technology that demonstrates how existing copper access networks can be used to deliver 1Gbps symmetrical ultra-broadband access services. . . .

                      The Bell Labs tests used a prototype technology called XG-FAST. This is an extension of G.fast technology, a new broadband standard currently being finalized by the ITU. When it becomes commercially available in 2015, G.fast will use a frequency range for data transmission of 106 MHz, giving broadband speeds up to 500 Mbps over a distance of 100 meters. In contrast, XG-FAST uses an increased frequency range up to 500 MHz to achieve higher speeds but over shorter distances. Bell Labs achieved 1 Gbps symmetrical over 70 meters on a single copper pair. 10 Gbps was achieved over a distance of 30 meters by using two pairs of lines (a technique known as "bonding"). Both tests used standard copper cable provided by a European operator.

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                        "The ‘Digital’ Scholarship Disconnect"

                        Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Humanities, Emerging Technologies, Research Libraries on June 17th, 2014

                        Clifford Lynch has published "The 'Digital' Scholarship Disconnect" in EDUCAUSE Review.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        Still, in all of these examples of digital scholarship, a key challenge remains: How can we curate and manage data now that so much of it is being produced and collected in digital form? How can we ensure that it will be discovered, shared, and reused to advance scholarship? We are struggling through the establishment of institutions, funding models, policies and practices, and even new legal requirements and community norms—ranging from cultural changes about who can use data (and when) to economic decisions about who should pay for what. Some disciplines are less contentious than others: for example, astronomy data is technically well-understood and usually not terribly sensitive. Reputation, rather than commercial reward, is wrapped up in astronomical discoveries, and there is no institutional review board to ensure the safety and dignity of astronomical objects. On the other hand, human subjects and their data raise an enormous number of questions about informed consent, privacy, and anonymization; when there are genetic markers or possible treatments to be discovered or validated, serious high-value commercial interests may be at stake. All of these factors tend to work against the free and convenient sharing of data.

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