Archive for the 'Digital Humanities' Category

Digital Scholarship Centers: Trends and Good Practice

Posted in Digital Humanities, Research Libraries on December 8th, 2014

CNI has released Digital Scholarship Centers: Trends and Good Practice.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The purpose of this workshop was to explore the varying models of supporting digital scholarship in higher education, focusing on those that involve partnerships with, or a strong role for, libraries and information technology units. Participants were selected to represent a range of scholarship center models, different types of higher education institutions, and a variety of roles, including senior leadership, heads of centers, faculty closely affiliated with centers, and graduate students with close ties to centers.

Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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    Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future

    Posted in Digital Humanities, Open Access, Publishing on December 1st, 2014

    Martin Paul Eve has published Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future with Cambridge University Pres.

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    I am extremely pleased to announce that my book, Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future has today been published by Cambridge University Press. The book offers a background to open access and its specifics for the humanities disciplines, as well as setting out the economics and politics of the phenomenon. It also has a very fine preface by Peter Suber! You can download the book for absolutely free (under a CC BY-SA license) at the official website (click the green "open access" button). You can also buy an extremely good value paperback copy, with all my royalties going to Arthritis Research UK, from the usual suspects.

    Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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      "Librarians and Scholars: Partners in Digital Humanities"

      Posted in Digital Humanities, Research Libraries on July 8th, 2014

      Laurie Alexander et al. have published "Librarians and Scholars: Partners in Digital Humanities" in EDUCAUSE Review.

      Here's an excerpt:

      Key Takeaways

      • Libraries have numerous capabilities and considerable expertise available to accelerate digital humanities initiatives.
      • The University of Michigan Library developed a model for effective partnership between libraries and digital humanities scholars; this model contributes to both a definition and redefinition of this emergent field.
      • As the U-M experience shows, using the digital humanities as a key innovation tool can help libraries and their host institutions transform the way research, teaching, and learning are conceptualized.

      Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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        Sustaining the Digital Humanities: Host-Institution Support beyond the Start-Up Phase

        Posted in ARL Libraries, Digital Humanities, Research Libraries on June 19th, 2014

        Ithaka S+R has released Sustaining the Digital Humanities: Host-Institution Support beyond the Start-Up Phase.

        Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

        In this study, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, Ithaka S+R explored the different models colleges and universities have adopted to support DH outputs on their campuses. . . .

        Over the course of this study, Ithaka S+R interviewed more than 125 stakeholders and faculty project leaders at colleges and universities within the US. These interviews included a deep-dive phase of exploration focused on support for the digital humanities at four campuses”Columbia University, Brown University, Indiana University Bloomington, and the University of Wisconsin at Madison. This research helped us to better understand how institutions are navigating issues related to the sustainability of DH resources and what successful strategies are emerging.

        Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

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          "The ‘Digital’ Scholarship Disconnect"

          Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Humanities, Emerging Technologies, Research Libraries on June 17th, 2014

          Clifford Lynch has published "The 'Digital' Scholarship Disconnect" in EDUCAUSE Review.

          Here's an excerpt:

          Still, in all of these examples of digital scholarship, a key challenge remains: How can we curate and manage data now that so much of it is being produced and collected in digital form? How can we ensure that it will be discovered, shared, and reused to advance scholarship? We are struggling through the establishment of institutions, funding models, policies and practices, and even new legal requirements and community norms—ranging from cultural changes about who can use data (and when) to economic decisions about who should pay for what. Some disciplines are less contentious than others: for example, astronomy data is technically well-understood and usually not terribly sensitive. Reputation, rather than commercial reward, is wrapped up in astronomical discoveries, and there is no institutional review board to ensure the safety and dignity of astronomical objects. On the other hand, human subjects and their data raise an enormous number of questions about informed consent, privacy, and anonymization; when there are genetic markers or possible treatments to be discovered or validated, serious high-value commercial interests may be at stake. All of these factors tend to work against the free and convenient sharing of data.

          Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

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            "The University Library as Incubator for Digital Scholarship"

            Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Humanities, Emerging Technologies, Research Libraries on June 17th, 2014

            Bryan Sinclair has published "The University Library as Incubator for Digital Scholarship" in EDUCAUSE Review.

            Here's an excerpt:

            The campus of the future will be increasingly connected and collaborative, and the library can be the community center and beta test kitchen for new forms of interdisciplinary inquiry. Libraries have always been in the business of knowledge creation and transfer, and the digital scholarship incubator within the library can serve as a natural extension of this essential function. In an age of visualization, analytics, big data, and new forms of online publishing, these central spaces can facilitate knowledge creation and transfer by connecting people, data, and technology in a shared collaborative space.

            Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

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              "Pixel Dust: Illusions of Innovation in Scholarly Publishing"

              Posted in Digital Humanities on January 27th, 2014

              Johanna Drucker has published "Pixel Dust: Illusions of Innovation in Scholarly Publishing" in the Los Angeles Review of Books.

              Here's an excerpt :

              In the end, no special effects, dazzling displays, augmented realities, or multimodal cross-platform designs substitute for content. Scholarship, good scholarship, the work of a lifetime commitment to working in a field—mapping its references, arguments, scholars, sources, and terrain of discourse—has no substitute.

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                Encouraging Digital Scholarly Publishing in the Humanities: White Paper

                Posted in Digital Humanities, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Books on November 5th, 2013

                The University of North Georgia has released Encouraging Digital Scholarly Publishing in the Humanities: White Paper.

                Here's an excerpt:

                This project, led by the University Press of North Georgia, and funded by a Digital Start-Up grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities focused on exploring the peer review process and increasing its usefulness to presses and scholars publishing digitally. By exploring this issues we have made recommendations for best practices in digital publishing, specifically for small academic presses. Through surveys and a workshop of key stakeholder groups (press directors, college administrators, humanities faculty, and library/technology center directors), we found a strong investment in the "gold standard" of double- or single-blind peer review. Working within the current academic publishing structure (including publishing in print) was a priority, even to presses and faculty members who were actively exploring digital publishing and open access models. On closer inspection, we realized that the various stakeholders valued the current peer review process for different reasons. And we found that the value of peer review goes beyond vetting the quality of scholarship and manuscript content. Based on these findings, we considered ways to obtain these benefits within the current academic structure through innovative peer review processes. At the same time, we looked for ways of offsetting potential risks associated with these alternative methods. We considered cost effective ways to accommodate the needs of the disparate constituencies involved in academic publishing while allowing room for digital publishing. While our findings focus primarily on small academic presses, they also have significant implications for the open access community.

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