Archive for the 'Digital Humanities' Category

"Penn Receives $7 Million Gift to Create Price Lab for Digital Humanities"

Posted in Digital Humanities, Grants on February 27th, 2015

The University of Pennsylvania has released "Penn Receives $7 Million Gift to Create Price Lab for Digital Humanities."

Here's an excerpt:

Funded by a generous $7 million gift from alumnus and SAS Overseer Michael J. Price and his wife, Vikki, the Price Lab for Digital Humanities will be the centerpiece of the "Humanities in the Digital Age" initiative of SAS's recently released strategic plan, and will provide the technological hardware and technical support staff necessary for a robust program that reaches across the University. . . .

The Price Lab will facilitate collaborations with the Penn Libraries; the Penn Museum; the Digital Media Design program in the School of Engineering and Applied Science; the Center for Visualization of Digital Information; the Penn Institute for Computational Science; Penn Medicine's Cartographic Modeling Lab; and SAS's Linguistic Data Consortium.

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    Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities Grants

    Posted in Digital Humanities on February 3rd, 2015

    The NEH has released information about Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities grants.

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    These NEH grants support national or regional (multistate) training programs for scholars and advanced graduate students to broaden and extend their knowledge of digital humanities. Through these programs, NEH seeks to increase the number of humanities scholars using digital technology in their research and to broadly disseminate knowledge about advanced technology tools and methodologies relevant to the humanities.

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      NC State Offers Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities

      Posted in Digital Humanities on February 3rd, 2015

      NC State University is offering a Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities.

      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

      The graduate certificate in digital humanities allows degree or non-degree seeking graduate students to design a curriculum of interdisciplinary study at the forefront of digital methods in the humanities. Digital humanities (or "DH") comprises a big tent of diverse disciplinary and technical pursuits, and our certificate program is premised on curricular flexibility to allow students to pursue, with the support of certificate staff and faculty, the innovative opportunities they see for creative, critically-informed, media-inflected research and teaching pursuits in their fields, from the humanities to colleges across the university. Including digitization of cultural heritage materials, studies in media history and technologies, analysis and critique of digital culture, applied programming for analysis and visualization, project management, interface design and user experience, and/or digital pedagogies, the certificate features abundant contexts and skills-training in which to define next-generation teaching and research.

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        Digital Scholarship Centers: Trends and Good Practice

        Posted in Digital Humanities, Research Libraries on December 8th, 2014

        CNI has released Digital Scholarship Centers: Trends and Good Practice.

        Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

        The purpose of this workshop was to explore the varying models of supporting digital scholarship in higher education, focusing on those that involve partnerships with, or a strong role for, libraries and information technology units. Participants were selected to represent a range of scholarship center models, different types of higher education institutions, and a variety of roles, including senior leadership, heads of centers, faculty closely affiliated with centers, and graduate students with close ties to centers.

        Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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          Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future

          Posted in Digital Humanities, Open Access, Publishing on December 1st, 2014

          Martin Paul Eve has published Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future with Cambridge University Pres.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          I am extremely pleased to announce that my book, Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future has today been published by Cambridge University Press. The book offers a background to open access and its specifics for the humanities disciplines, as well as setting out the economics and politics of the phenomenon. It also has a very fine preface by Peter Suber! You can download the book for absolutely free (under a CC BY-SA license) at the official website (click the green "open access" button). You can also buy an extremely good value paperback copy, with all my royalties going to Arthritis Research UK, from the usual suspects.

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            "Librarians and Scholars: Partners in Digital Humanities"

            Posted in Digital Humanities, Research Libraries on July 8th, 2014

            Laurie Alexander et al. have published "Librarians and Scholars: Partners in Digital Humanities" in EDUCAUSE Review.

            Here's an excerpt:

            Key Takeaways

            • Libraries have numerous capabilities and considerable expertise available to accelerate digital humanities initiatives.
            • The University of Michigan Library developed a model for effective partnership between libraries and digital humanities scholars; this model contributes to both a definition and redefinition of this emergent field.
            • As the U-M experience shows, using the digital humanities as a key innovation tool can help libraries and their host institutions transform the way research, teaching, and learning are conceptualized.

            Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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              Sustaining the Digital Humanities: Host-Institution Support beyond the Start-Up Phase

              Posted in ARL Libraries, Digital Humanities, Research Libraries on June 19th, 2014

              Ithaka S+R has released Sustaining the Digital Humanities: Host-Institution Support beyond the Start-Up Phase.

              Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

              In this study, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, Ithaka S+R explored the different models colleges and universities have adopted to support DH outputs on their campuses. . . .

              Over the course of this study, Ithaka S+R interviewed more than 125 stakeholders and faculty project leaders at colleges and universities within the US. These interviews included a deep-dive phase of exploration focused on support for the digital humanities at four campuses”Columbia University, Brown University, Indiana University Bloomington, and the University of Wisconsin at Madison. This research helped us to better understand how institutions are navigating issues related to the sustainability of DH resources and what successful strategies are emerging.

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                "The ‘Digital’ Scholarship Disconnect"

                Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Humanities, Emerging Technologies, Research Libraries on June 17th, 2014

                Clifford Lynch has published "The 'Digital' Scholarship Disconnect" in EDUCAUSE Review.

                Here's an excerpt:

                Still, in all of these examples of digital scholarship, a key challenge remains: How can we curate and manage data now that so much of it is being produced and collected in digital form? How can we ensure that it will be discovered, shared, and reused to advance scholarship? We are struggling through the establishment of institutions, funding models, policies and practices, and even new legal requirements and community norms—ranging from cultural changes about who can use data (and when) to economic decisions about who should pay for what. Some disciplines are less contentious than others: for example, astronomy data is technically well-understood and usually not terribly sensitive. Reputation, rather than commercial reward, is wrapped up in astronomical discoveries, and there is no institutional review board to ensure the safety and dignity of astronomical objects. On the other hand, human subjects and their data raise an enormous number of questions about informed consent, privacy, and anonymization; when there are genetic markers or possible treatments to be discovered or validated, serious high-value commercial interests may be at stake. All of these factors tend to work against the free and convenient sharing of data.

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