Archive for the 'Digital Humanities' Category

THATCamp "Manifesto for the Digital Humanities"

Posted in Digital Humanities, Open Access on July 5th, 2010

THATCamp Paris 2010 issued a "Manifesto for the Digital Humanities." THATCamp is a "a user-generated 'unconference' on digital humanities."

Here's an excerpt:

9. We call for open access to data and metadata, which must be documented and interoperable, both technically and conceptually.

10. We support the dissemination, exchange and free modification of methods, code, formats and research findings.

11. We call for the integration of digital humanities education within social science and humanities curricula. We also wish to see the creation of diplomas specific to the digital humanities, and the development of dedicated professional education. Finally, we want such expertise to be considered in recruitment and career development.

12. We commit to building a collective expertise based upon a common vocabulary, a collective expertise proceeding from the work of all the actors involved. This collective expertise is to become a common good. It is a scientific opportunity, but also an opportunity for professional insertion in all sectors.

13. We want to help define and propagate best practices, corresponding to needs identified within or across disciplines, which should derive and evolve from debate and consensus within the communities concerned. The fundamental openness of the digital humanities nevertheless assures a pragmatic approach to protocols and visions, which maintains the right to coexistence of different and competing methods, to the benefit of both thought and practice.

14. We call for the creation of scalable digital infrastructures responding to real needs. These digital infrastructures will be built iteratively, based upon methods and approaches that prove successful in research communities.

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    NEH Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants Awards Announced

    Posted in Digital Humanities, Grants on March 31st, 2010

    The NEH Office of Digital Humanities has announced recent awards from its Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants program.

    The awards are:

    • City of Philadelphia, Department of Records—Philadelphia, PA: Historic Overlays on Smart Phones
    • Early Manuscripts Electronic Library—Rolling Hills Estates, CA: The Nyangwe Diary of David Livingstone: Restoring the Text
    • George Mason University—Fairfax, VA: Crowdsourcing Documentary Transcription: an Open Source Tool
    • Georgia Tech Research Corporation—Atlanta, GA: Gesture, Rhetoric, and Digital Storytelling
    • Pennsylvania State University, Main Campus—University Park, PA: Learning as Playing: An Animated, Interactive Archive of 17th-19th Century Narrative Media For and By Children
    • Sweet Briar College—Sweet Briar, VA: African-American Families Database: Community Formation in Albemarle County, Virginia, 1850-1880
    • University of Arizona—Tucson, AZ: Poetry Audio/Video Library Phase 2
    • University of California, Berkeley—Berkeley, CA: Berkeley Prosopography Services: Building Research Communities and Restoring Ancient Communities through Digital Tools
    • University of California, Los Angeles—Los Angeles, CA: Software Interface for Real-time Exploration of Three-Dimensional Computer Models of Historic Urban Environments
    • University of California, San Diego—La Jolla, CA: Interactive Visualization of Media Collections for Humanities Research
    • University of Chicago—Chicago, IL: Dictionnaire Vivant de la Langue Francaise (DVLF): Expanding the French Dictionary
    • University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc.—Athens, GA: Telecollaborative Webcasting:Strengthening Acquisition of Humanities Content Knowledge through Foreign Language Education
    • University of Nebraska, Board of Regents—Lincoln, NE: Sustaining Digital History
    • University of New Mexico—Albuquerque, NM: Digital Documentation and Reconstruction of an Ancient Maya Temple and Prototype of Internet GIS Database of Maya Architecture
    • University of Virginia—Charlottesville, VA: ARTeFACT Movement Thesaurus
    • University of Virginia—Charlottesville, VA: New Digital Tools for Restoring Polychromy to 3D Digital Models of Sculpture
    • University of Virginia—Charlottesville, VA: Supercomputing for Digitized 3D Models of Cultural Heritage
    • Washington State University—Pullman, WA: Mukurtu: An Indigenous Archive and Publishing Tool
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      Overview of Open Access Models for eBooks in the Humanities and Social Sciences

      Posted in Digital Humanities, E-Books, Open Access, Scholarly Books on March 28th, 2010

      Open Access Publishing in European Networks has released Overview of Open Access Models for eBooks in the Humanities and Social Sciences.

      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

      A new survey of Open Access book publishing confirms a wide variety of approaches, as well as a continuing search for the optimal publishing and business models. While Open Access is still in an experimental phase of trying out new models, and tracking the readers’ online and offline preferences to gauge the best way forward, some trends and patterns have started to emerge.

      This recently conducted survey of a wide international range of publishing initiatives compares the publishing- and business models they employ, while examining their reasons for engaging in Open Access. The report cites findings from case studies including major academic presses (such as Yale University Press, the MIT Press, the University of California Press), commercial publishers (Bloomsbury Academic), library-press partnerships (the University of Michigan Press), academic led-presses (Open Humanities Press), commercial-academic press ventures, as well as other partnerships, which all offer Open Access to anything from a single title to the entire retro-digitized backlist.

      While it is too early to confirm with any certainty which models are the most viable in the long term, it is clear that sustainable long-term business models require a measure of external funding, while cutting costs and creating efficiencies through the use of shared resources, digitized production process and a new range of revenue sources.

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        Shakespeare Quartos Archive Launched

        Posted in Digital Archives and Special Collections, Digital Humanities on November 17th, 2009

        The Folger Shakespeare Library has announced the launch of the Shakespeare Quartos Archive.

        Here's an excerpt from the press release:

        For the first time, digitized copies of rare early editions of William Shakespeare’s Hamlet have been compiled into a single online collection. The Shakespeare Quartos Archive (www.quartos.org) makes digitized versions of the play drawn from libraries in the US and the UK freely available to researchers worldwide.

        "The Shakespeare Quartos Archive presents new and innovative opportunities that were simply not possible before for scholars, teachers, and students to explore Hamlet," said Folger Director Gail Kern Paster.

        "We are confident that the Shakespeare Quartos Archive will become an indispensable online resource for the worldwide community of scholars, teachers, and students with an interest in Shakespeare, enabling them to access and compare these important texts," said Richard Ovenden, Associate Director of the Bodleian Library.

        In the absence of surviving manuscripts, the quartos—Shakespeare's earliest printed editions—offer the closest known evidence to what Shakespeare might actually have written, and what appeared on the early modern English stage. Print copies of the Hamlet quartos are of immense interest to scholars, editors, educators, and theater directors, yet due to their rarity and fragility, are not readily available for study. The Shakespeare Quartos Archive offers freely-accessible, high-resolution digital editions of quarto editions of Hamlet, enabling users to compare texts side-by-side, search full-text transcriptions of each quarto, and annotate and tag passages for future reference. Users can also create personal collections of page images and annotations and share these collections with other researchers. . . .

        The Shakespeare Quartos Archive contains texts drawn from holdings at the British Library, the Bodleian Library, the University of Edinburgh Library, the Huntington Library, and the National Library of Scotland, in addition to the Folger. These six institutions worked in conjunction with the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities at the University of Maryland and the Shakespeare Institute at Birmingham University to digitize and transcribe 32 copies of Hamlet. The British Library's companion project, "Shakespeare in Quarto," is the first online collection to provide access to at least one copy of every pre-1642 Shakespeare play that was printed in a quarto edition and can be accessed at www.bl.uk.

        The Shakespeare Quartos Archive was one of the first projects awarded funding through JISC/NEH Transatlantic Digitization Collaboration Grants in 2008. The grants support the innovative use of digitization technology to advance the humanities and are administered through joint collaboration between the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in the United States and the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) in the United Kingdom.

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          "The Humanities and the NEH"

          Posted in Digital Humanities, Open Access on September 2nd, 2009

          In "The Humanities and the NEH," Scott Jaschik summarizes a podcast interview with James A. Leach, the National Endowment for the Humanities chairman.

          Here's an excerpt:

          Among other topics he discussed: . . . .

          • In discussions of digitization of scholarship and the push to require free online access to such work that receives federal support, Leach said he understands the importance of copyright, but that he leans "toward open access" and wants "maximum availability" of scholarship.
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            NEH Office of Digital Humanities Announces Grant Awards

            Posted in Digital Humanities, Grants on August 20th, 2009

            The NEH Office of Digital Humanities has announced 21 new awards from its Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants program.

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              Fellowships at Digital Humanities Centers

              Posted in Digital Humanities on July 30th, 2009

              The NEH Office of Digital Humanities has announced the availability of fellowships at Digital Humanities Centers.

              See the application guidelines for details.

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                CLIR Gets Mellon Foundation Grant to Explore Use of Intelligence Community Tools in Digital Humanities

                Posted in Digital Humanities on June 23rd, 2009

                The Council on Library and Information Resources has been awarded a $28,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to explore the potential use of declassified intelligence community tools in digital humanities research.

                Here's an excerpt from the press release:

                The confluence of digital conversion activities and technological advances allows researchers in the humanities to examine questions that require scale and computational power. Intelligence-gathering agencies are a potentially excellent source for tools, resources, and methodologies that have direct bearing on and applicability to contemporary digital humanities research because of the similarity in the methodological challenges, namely, dealing with diverse source material at a scale that exceeds the capacity of humans.

                Blogs, wikis, email, radio and television broadcasts, conference proceedings, folksonomies, and Web sites are just a few of the publicly accessible resources of potential interest to scholars. The analytical tools applied to these sources enable searching for patterns (linguistic and imagistic) against very large data sets, data mining, and semantic analysis, among other functions; in some instances they have already been used in the business community to navigate heterogeneous information.

                The grant will support a literature search and evaluation of tool findability, a meeting to discuss how scholars might use such tools and how access to the tools could advance humanities scholarship, and publication of results.

                "This award, and the research focus it will support, represents a new, vibrant, and potentially significant area of interest for CLIR, and one that may over time greatly benefit our constituency," said CLIR President Chuck Henry.

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