Archive for the 'Digital Humanities' Category

A Digital Humanities Manifesto 2.0

Posted in Digital Humanities on June 7th, 2009

The UCLA Mellon Seminar in Digital Humanities has released A Digital Humanities Manifesto 2.0 (Thanks to HASTAC.).

Here's an excerpt:

Digital Humanities is not a unified field but an array of convergent practices that explore a universe in which: a) print is no longer the exclusive or the normative medium in which knowledge is produced and/or disseminated; instead, print finds itself absorbed into new, multimedia configurations; and b) digital tools, techniques, and media have altered the production and dissemination of knowledge in the arts, human and social sciences. The Digital Humanities seeks to play an inaugural role with respect to a world in which, no longer the sole producers, stewards, and disseminators of knowledge or culture, universities are called upon to shape natively digital models of scholarly discourse for the newly emergent public spheres of the present era (the www, the blogosphere, digital libraries, etc.), to model excellence and innovation in these domains, and to facilitate the formation of networks of knowledge production, exchange, and dissemination that are, at once, global and local.

“No-Fee OA Journals in the Humanities, Three Case Studies: A Presentation by Open Humanities Press”

Posted in Digital Humanities, Open Access, Scholarly Journals on May 17th, 2009

S. A. Jottkandt has self-archived "No-Fee OA Journals in the Humanities, Three Case Studies: A Presentation by Open Humanities Press" in E-LIS.

Here's the abstract:

Open Humanities Press (OHP) is the first open access publisher devoted to contemporary critical theory. OHP was created as a grassroots movement of academics, librarians, journal editors and technology specialists to address the growing inequality of readers' access to critical materials necessary for our research. In this presentation, I offer case studies of journals edited by the founders of the new OA academic journal consortium, Open Humanities Press, as a starting point for a discussion of how professional open access publishing may be achieved without author-side fees (a "business model" that for both practical and cultural reasons is inappropriate in the context of humanities publishing). While reputable open access publishing in the humanities confronts significant challenges, the problem of how to finance it—the problem that is frequently raised as the Gold path's chief obstacle in the sciences—appears far and away the least pressing.

Approaches to Managing and Collecting Born-Digital Literary Materials for Scholarly Use

Posted in Digital Archives and Special Collections, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Humanities on May 13th, 2009

The Office of Digital Humanities in the National Endowment for the Humanities has released the final version of Approaches to Managing and Collecting Born-Digital Literary Materials for Scholarly Use.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

This project is about developing archival tools and best practices for preserving born-digital documents produced by contemporary authors. Traditionally, humanists have found great scholarly value in studying the papers, correspondence, and first drafts of authors, politicians, and other historical figures. In this white paper, the project director make note that contemporary figures compose almost all of their materials on a computer. What challenges will this present to humanists, archivists, and librarians in the future? This very readable paper explores many of these issues with specific case studies involving a number of leading libraries and archives.

Controlling Access to and Use of Online Cultural Collections: A Survey of U.S. Archives, Libraries and Museums for IMLS

Posted in Copyright, Digital Archives and Special Collections, Digital Humanities, Digital Rights Management, Licenses, Museums on April 30th, 2009

Kristin Eschenfelder has self-archived a draft of Controlling Access to and Use of Online Cultural Collections: A Survey of U.S. Archives, Libraries and Museums for IMLS in dLIST.

Here's an excerpt:

This report describes the results of an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) funded study to investigate the use of technological or policy tools to control patron access to or use of digital collections of cultural materials created by U.S. archives, libraries and museums. The technological and policy tools serve primarily to control copying or other reuses of digital materials. The study had the following goals: 1. Assess what technical and policy tools cultural institutions are employing to control access to and use of online digital collections. 2. Investigate motivations for controlling access to or use of collections (e.g., copyright, privacy, protecting traditional restrictions, income generation etc.). 3. Investigate discouragers to the implementation of access and use control systems (e.g., preference for open collections, lack of resources, institutional mission, etc.). 4. Gauge interest in implementing technical systems to control access to and use of collections. 5. Determine what types of assistance IMLS could provide. 6. Identify institutions with innovative controlled online collections for follow up case studies on policy, technical and managerial details.

Historians’ Work Disrupted When Paper of Record Digital Archive Vanishes after Google Purchase

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Humanities, Google and Other Search Engines on April 22nd, 2009

After Google purchased the Paper of Record digital archive, it brought the site down, upsetting historians that relied on the collection of older newspapers. Although the site will be temporarily restored with Google's permission, the incident raises issues about the permanence and reliability of scholarly digital archives.

Read more about it at "Digital Archives That Disappear" and "'Paper of Record' Disappears, Leaving Historians in the Lurch."

NEH Humanities Collections and Reference Resources Grants

Posted in Digital Humanities, Digitization, Grants on April 20th, 2009

The National Endowment for the Humanities has issued a call for grant proposals for its Humanities Collections and Reference Resources Program.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The Humanities Collections and Reference Resources program supports projects that provide an essential foundation for scholarship, education, and public programming in the humanities. Thousands of libraries, archives, museums, and historical organizations across the country maintain important collections of books and manuscripts, photographs, sound recordings and moving images, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, art and material culture, electronic records, and digital objects. Funding from this program strengthens efforts to extend the life of such materials and make their intellectual content widely accessible, often through the use of digital technology. Awards are also made to create various reference resources that facilitate use of cultural materials, from works that provide basic information quickly to tools that synthesize and codify knowledge of a subject for in-depth investigation.

Applications may be submitted for projects that include or combine the following activities:

  • arranging and describing archival and manuscript collections;
  • cataloging collections of printed works, photographs, recorded sound, moving images, art, and material culture;
  • implementing preservation measures, such as basic rehousing, reformatting, deacidification, or conservation treatment;
  • digitizing collections, or preserving and improving access to born-digital resources;
  • developing databases, virtual collections, or other electronic resources to codify information on a subject field or to provide integrated access to selected humanities materials;
  • creating encyclopedias;
  • preparing linguistic tools, such as historical and etymological dictionaries, corpora, and reference grammars (separate funding is available for endangered language projects in partnership with the National Science Foundation);
  • developing tools for spatial analysis and representation of humanities data, such as atlases and geographical information systems (GIS); and
  • designing digital tools to facilitate use of humanities resources.

King’s College London Offers MA in Digital Asset Management

Posted in Digital Humanities on April 9th, 2009

King's College London's Centre for Computing in the Humanities and the Centre for e-Research are offering an MA in Digital Asset Management (Thanks to The Stoa Consortium.)

A brochure is available.

NEH Preservation and Access Research and Development Grants

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Humanities, Grants on April 2nd, 2009

The National Endowment for the Humanities is soliciting applications for Preservation and Access Research and Development grants, with an 7/30/09 deadline.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Preservation and Access Research and Development grants support projects that address major challenges in preserving or providing access to humanities collections and resources. These challenges include the need to find better ways to preserve materials of critical importance to the nation's cultural heritage—from fragile artifacts and manuscripts to analog recordings and digital assets subject to technological obsolescence—and to develop advanced modes of searching, discovering, and using such materials. . . .

NEH especially encourages applications that address the following areas:

  • Digital Preservation: how to preserve digital humanities materials, including those for which no analog counterparts exist;
  • Recorded Sound and Moving Image Collections: how to preserve and increase access to the record of the twentieth century contained in these formats; and
  • Preventive Conservation: how to protect and slow the deterioration of humanities collections through the use of sustainable preservation strategies.

Working Together or Apart: Promoting the Next Generation of Digital Scholarship

Posted in Cyberinfrastructure/E-Science, Digital Humanities on April 2nd, 2009

The Council on Library and Information Resources has released Working Together or Apart: Promoting the Next Generation of Digital Scholarship: Report of a Workshop Cosponsored by the Council on Library and Information Resources and The National Endowment for the Humanities

Here's an excerpt from the Executive Summary:

On September 15, 2008, CLIR, in cooperation with the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), held a symposium to explore research topics arising at the intersection of humanities, social sciences, and computer science. The meeting addressed two fundamental questions: (1) how do the new media advance and transform the interpretation and analysis of text, image, and other sources of interest to the humanities and social sciences and enable new expression and pedagogy?, and (2) how do those processes of inquiry pose questions and challenges for research in computer science as well as in the humanities and social sciences?

Working Together or Apart considers these two questions. The volume opens with an essay by CLIR Director of Programs Amy Friedlander, which contextualizes and synthesizes the day's discussion. It is followed by six papers prepared for the meeting, and a summary of a report on digital humanities centers commissioned by CLIR and written by Diane Zorich.

March 18th: It’s a Day in the Life of the Digital Humanities

Posted in Digital Humanities on March 18th, 2009

Today, digital humanists will document their activities as part of a Day in the Life of the Digital Humanities .

Here's an excerpt from the wiki:

A Day in the Life of the Digital Humanities (Day of DH) is a community publication project that will bring together digital humanists from around the world to document what they do on one day, March 18th. The goal of the project is to create a web site that weaves together the journals of the participants into a picture that answers the question, "Just what do computing humanists really do?" Participants will document their day through photographs and commentary in a blog-like journal. The collection of these journals with links, tags, and comments will make up the final work which will be published online.

NEH Office of Digital Humanities Announces 13 Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Posted in Digital Humanities, Grants on March 12th, 2009

The NEH Office of Digital Humanities has announced the award of 13 Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants.

NEH Funds 197 Humanities Projects

Posted in Digital Humanities, Grants on March 10th, 2009

The National Endowment for the Humanities has made $20 million in grant awards/offers to 197 humanities projects.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

The funding announced today will support a variety of projects in diverse fields of the humanities. Projects receiving support will, for example, provide college faculty the opportunity to deepen their knowledge in the humanities to enhance undergraduate instruction; support high-quality media projects for public audiences that explore significant ideas and events in the humanities; enable researchers to record and archive languages facing extinction; and encourage the development of innovations in the digital humanities.

This award cycle, institutions and individuals in 36 states and the District of Columbia will receive NEH support. Projects undertaken by American scholars working outside the United States are also receiving support. A complete state-by-state listing of grants and offers of matching funds is available below:


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