Archive for the 'Institutional Repositories' Category

The Current State of Open Access Repository Interoperability

Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Reports and White Papers on October 25th, 2012

The Confederation of Open Access Repositories has released The Current State of Open Access Repository Interoperability.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The report provides an overview of the current interoperability landscape in terms of the types of services that are now possible because of recent research and development efforts from throughout the Open Access community. The report covers seven areas of focus for current interoperability initiatives, and it provides overviews of nineteen key interoperability initiatives.

The intended audience includes institutions and repository managers operating at different points in terms of infrastructure, resources, and institutional support. For institutions new to Open Access and repositories, the report aims to provide guidance for getting started and indicates which interoperability initiatives are necessary to implement in order to achieve specific services. For institutions and repository managers already involved in OA and repositories, the report may provide ideas for additional functionality to add to your repository or further services that are possible to provide to your community.

| Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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    "Open Access Repositories in Asia: From SAARC to Asian Tigers"

    Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access on October 7th, 2012

    Bijan Kumar Roy, Subal Chandra Biswas, and Parthasarathi Mukhopadhyay have published "Open Access Repositories in Asia: From SAARC to Asian Tigers" in Library Philosophy and Practice.

    Here's an excerpt:

    This paper provides an overview of Open Access Repository (OAR) initiatives taken in Asian Countries with special reference to SAARC [South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation] Countries. The purpose of this study is to take a broad look at the current state of deployment of OARs in the Asian countries. It also compares selected OARs against a set of carefully crafted criteria. Key findings have been highlighted along with suggestions for further development of OARs in global context.

    | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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      "Jarrow, Electronic Thesis, and Dissertation Software"

      Posted in Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs), Institutional Repositories on October 3rd, 2012

      James R.W. MacDonald and Daniel Yule have published "Jarrow, Electronic Thesis, and Dissertation Software" in the latest issue of the Code4Lib Journal.

      Here's an excerpt:

      Collecting and disseminating theses and dissertations electronically is not a new concept. Tools and platforms have emerged to handle various components of the submission and distribution process. However, there is not a tool that handles the entirety of the process from the moment the student begins work on their thesis to the dissemination of the final thesis. The authors have created such a tool which they have called Jarrow. After reviewing available open-source software for theses submission and open-source institutional repository software this paper discusses why and how Jarrow was created and how it works. Jarrow can be downloaded and the project followed at http://code.library.unbc.ca.

      | Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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        "Beyond Open Access: An Examination of Australian Academic Publication Behaviour"

        Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access on October 1st, 2012

        Paul Mercieca has self-archived his Ph.D. theses, "Beyond Open Access: An Examination of Australian Academic Publication Behaviour," in the RMIT Research Repository.

        Here's an excerpt:

        This study explored the publication behaviour of academics from Australian universities and how this impacted on the adoption of open access models of scholarly publishing. . . .

        The outcome of this study was a number of theoretical models that suggested that the changing policies associated with research recognition have narrowed the publication behaviour of the Australian academic community and that this could be to the detriment of the adoption of alternative models of scholarly publishing.. . .

        The study also examined engagement with institutional repositories and highlighted the importance of mediation in populating the content of repositories. The process of permission-based mandates was supported as a means to develop repository content.

        | Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals | Digital Scholarship |

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          "Open Metrics for Open Repositories"

          Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Scholarly Metrics on July 12th, 2012

          Brian Kelly, Nick Sheppard, Jenny Delasalle, Mark Dewey, Owen Stephens, Gareth J Johnson, and Stephanie Taylor have self-archived "Open Metrics for Open Repositories" in University of Bath Research.

          Here's an excerpt:

          Increasingly there is a need for quantitative evidence in order to help demonstrate the value of online services. Such evidence can also help to detect emerging patterns of usage and identify associated operational best practice. This paper seeks to initiate a discussion on approaches to metrics for institutional repositories by providing a high-level overview of the benefits of metrics for a variety of stakeholders. The paper outlines the potential benefits which can be gained from providing richer statistics related to the use of institutional repositories and also reviews related work in this area. The authors describe a JISC-funded project which harvested a large number of repositories in order to identify patterns of use of metadata attributes and summarise the key findings. The paper provides a case study which reviews plans to provide a richer set of statistics within one institutional repository as well as requirements from the researcher community. An example of how third-party aggregation services may provide metrics on behalf of the repository community is given. The authors conclude with a call for repository managers, developers and policy makers to be pro-active in providing open access to metrics for open repositories.

          | Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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            A Technical Review of Open Access Repository Registries: OpenDOAR and ROAR

            Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Reports and White Papers on July 11th, 2012

            JISC has released A Technical Review of Open Access Repository Registries: OpenDOAR and ROAR, which was written in 7/1/2011 and deposited on 7/5/2012.

            Here's an excerpt:

            This document provides a technical review of the capabilities, benefits and drawbacks of two leading Open Access Repository Registries (OARRs)—OpenDOAR and ROAR. Both systems are considered qualitatively and quantitatively with a view to identifying those facets which provide value for a repository registry service.

            | Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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              "Digital Repositories Ten Years On: What Do Scientific Researchers Think of Them and How Do They Use Them?"

              Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Institutional Repositories, Self-Archiving on June 27th, 2012

              David Nicholas has self-archived "Digital Repositories Ten Years On: What Do Scientific Researchers Think of Them and How Do They Use Them?" at the CIBER Research Ltd.'s website

              Here's an excerpt:

              Digital repositories have been with us for more than a decade, and despite the considerable media and conference attention they engender, we know very little about their use by academics. This paper sets out to address this by reporting on how well they are used, what they are used for, what researchers' think of them, and where they thought they were going. Nearly 1,700 scientific researchers, mostly physical scientists, responded to an international survey of digital repositories, making it the largest survey of its kind. High deposit rates were found and mandates appear to be working, especially with younger researchers. Repositories have made significant inroads in terms of impact and use despite, in the case of institutional repositories, the very limited resources deployed. Subject repositories, like arXiv and PubMed Central, have certainly come of age but institutional repositories probably have not come of age yet although there are drivers in place which, in theory anyway, are moving them towards early adulthood.

              | Digital Scholarship |

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                Lasting Impact: Sustainability of Disciplinary Repositories

                Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Institutional Repositories, OCLC, Reports and White Papers on May 13th, 2012

                OCLC Research has released Lasting Impact: Sustainability of Disciplinary Repositories.

                Here's an excerpt from the press release:

                This report offers a quick environmental scan of the repository landscape and then focuses on disciplinary repositories—those subject-based, often researcher-initiated loci for research information.

                Written by Senior Program Officer Ricky Erway, Lasting Impact: Sustainability of Disciplinary Repositories is intended to help librarians support researchers in accessing and disseminating research information. The report includes profiles of seven repositories with a focus on their varied business models. It concludes with a discussion of sustainability, including funding models, factors that contribute to a repository's success, and ways to bring in additional revenue.

                | Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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