Archive for the 'Libraries' Category

Open Library Foundation Launched

Posted in Libraries, Open Source Software on September 12th, 2016

The Open Library Foundation has been launched.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The Open Library Foundation has been established to promote open source projects for libraries and to foster and support contribution, distribution, and sustainability of the benefits of these projects. . . . .

The foundation was inspired by the creation of the FOLIO project. FOLIO was announced in June and is now building a diverse community of libraries, vendors and software developers. The goal of FOLIO is to create an open source Library Services Platform that can power innovative approaches to current practice, and encourage new and expanded library services that more fully support scholarly inquiry and knowledge production. The Foundation's inaugural projects also include two existing open source communities, the Open Library Environment (OLE) and the Global Open Knowledgebase (GOKb). . . .

The Open Library Foundation will make sure the code created from open source projects remains available and act as a "safe haven" for the projects' output-separated from the needs and goals of any contributor, user or affiliated party. The Open Library Foundation also will ensure that the code is freely available under an Apache v2 license.

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"Leading by Example? ALA Division Publications, Open Access, and Sustainability"

Posted in ALA, Libraries, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 7th, 2016

Nathan Hall et al. have published "Leading by Example? ALA Division Publications, Open Access, and Sustainability" in College & Research Libraries.

Here's an excerpt:

This investigation explores scholarly communication business models in American Library Association (ALA) division peer-reviewed academic journals. . . . Through an analysis of documented procedures, policies, and finances of five ALA division journals, we compare business and access models. We conclude that some ALA divisions prioritize the costs associated with changing business models, including hard-to-estimate costs such as the labor of volunteers. For other divisions, the financial aspects are less important than maintaining core values, such as those defined in ALA's Core Values in Librarianship.

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"Deconstructing the Durham Statement: The Persistence of Print Prestige During the Age of Open Access"

Posted in Libraries, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 15th, 2016

Sarah Reis has self-archived "Deconstructing the Durham Statement: The Persistence of Print Prestige During the Age of Open Access."

Here's an excerpt:

In the seven years following the promulgation of the Durham Statement on Open Access to Legal Scholarship, law journals have largely responded to the call to make articles available in open, electronic formats, but not to the call to stop print publication and publish only in electronic format. Nearly all of the flagship law reviews at ABA-accredited institutions still insist on publishing in print, despite the massive decline in print subscribers and economic and environmental waste. . . . The Durham Statement was drafted by law library directors from top law schools across the country. Law librarians today must assist in facilitating the transition if we ever expect to see a world of electronic-only publication of law journals. This paper argues that the Harvard Law Review, Yale Law Journal, and Stanford Law Review must be the first law reviews to transition to electronic-only publication, after which other law journals will follow suit.

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"Rethinking Authentication, Revamping the Business"

Posted in Authentication and Security, Libraries, Publishing, Research Libraries on June 23rd, 2016

Roger C. Schonfeld has published "Rethinking Authentication, Revamping the Business" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

While I have heard these arguments on and off this year, the meeting hosted by CCC [Copyright Clearance Center] made abundantly clear that there is great dissatisfaction with IP-based authentication across the community. Publishers want to move away from it due to their piracy concerns, their desire to improve seamlessness for researchers, and their expectations about the value they can offer through greater personalization. . . . And at least some academic librarians want to move away from it because of the poor user experience, especially with off-site access. Taking aim at IP authentication and proxy servers has become all the rage. But what might supplant them?

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State of America’s Libraries 2016

Posted in Libraries, Reports and White Papers on April 12th, 2016

ALA has released the State of America's Libraries 2016.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Academic, school, and public libraries continue to face an uncertain economy as they shift resources and services to meet the needs of the 21st-century digital world. The American Library Association launched a new public awareness campaign, "Libraries Transform," to help shift the mindset that "libraries are obsolete or nice to have" to "libraries are essential." This and other library trends of the past year, including the Top Ten Most Challenges Books of 2015, are detailed in the American Library Association's 2016 State of America's Libraries report, released during National Library Week, April 10- 16, 2016

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"Library Leadership for the Digital Age"

Posted in Digital Libraries, Libraries, Research Libraries on March 29th, 2016

Ithaka S+R has released "Library Leadership for the Digital Age."

Here's an excerpt:

Users think libraries are—or at least should be—digital. And yet, we in academic libraries are still counting how many of everything we have in our local collections. We brag about how big we are or how specialized we are. We advertise our job openings with language suggesting that our size is an indicator of greatness. But as libraries become digital, the language about size or subject strength seems slightly ridiculous.

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"Movers & Shakers 2016"

Posted in Libraries on March 15th, 2016

Library Journal has released "Movers & Shakers 2016." The first group, advocates, was released yesterday and a new group will be released each day through 3/18.

Here's an excerpt:

Fifteen years old and now over 750 leaders strong, Library Journal's Movers & Shakers (M&S) proudly introduces the Class of 2016-54 individuals profiled in 50 stories, who are changing the face of libraries of all types and sizes.

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"NYPL Shows Academic Libraries What ‘Public Domain’ Means"

Posted in Copyright, Libraries, Public Domain, Research Libraries on January 19th, 2016

Rick Anderson has published "NYPL Shows Academic Libraries What ‘Public Domain’ Means" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

In far too many libraries, public-domain documents and images are treated as if they were under copyright—and, even worse, in many cases the policies in question are written as if the holding libraries were themselves the copyright holders. Sometimes this is because the librarians who control access to those images genuinely don't understand copyright law: they believe that simply digitizing an image results in a copyrightable document (it doesn't), or that owning the physical item gives one legal say over how its intellectual content can be used (also untrue). The result is that in many academic libraries, intellectual content that the public has a right to access, copy, adapt, and generally reuse in any way we wish is being locked down and restricted by—ironically enough—librarians.

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Roy Tennant: "Remembering PACS-L"

Posted in Libraries, Scholarly Communication on December 2nd, 2015

Roy Tennant has published "Remembering PACS-L" in The Digital Shift.

Here's an excerpt:

For quite a while this list was where everything new in librarianship was happening. Despite its name, topics well beyond public access computer systems were discussed and debated. It was, in a nutshell, an essential place to hear and be heard. Its like was never to be again, as since then online communication channels have burgeoned and diversified.

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"OCLC Prints Last Library Catalog Cards"

Posted in Libraries, Metadata, OCLC on October 2nd, 2015

OCLC has released "OCLC Prints Last Library Catalog Cards."

Here's an excerpt:

OCLC printed its last library catalog cards today, officially closing the book on what was once a familiar resource for generations of information seekers who now use computer catalogs and online search engines to access library collections around the world.

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Libraries at the Crossroads

Posted in Libraries, Reports and White Papers on September 16th, 2015

The Pew Research Center has released Libraries at the Crossroads.

Here's an excerpt:

A new survey from Pew Research Center brings this complex situation into stark relief. Many Americans say they want public libraries to:

  • support local education;
  • serve special constituents such as veterans, active-duty military personnel and immigrants;
  • help local businesses, job seekers and those upgrading their work skills;
  • embrace new technologies such as 3-D printers and provide services to help patrons learn about high-tech gadgetry.

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"Emerald Group Publishing Tests ZEN, Increases Prices: What Does It Mean?"

Posted in Libraries, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 23rd, 2015

Richard Poynder has published "Emerald Group Publishing Tests ZEN, Increases Prices: What Does It Mean?" in Open and Shut?

Here's an excerpt:

So why has Emerald chosen to trial ZEN [Zero Embargo Now] with some of it library journals, what role did the LAG play in the decision, and what do members of the LAG feel about the associated 70% increase in the APCs of 32 engineering and technology journals?

In the hope of finding out I emailed Emerald and asked where I could find a list of advisory group members. It turns out that these are not publicly available.

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