Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

Open Science, Open Data, Open Access

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science on January 25th, 2016

UKeiG has released Open Science, Open Data, Open Access for non-members.

Here's an excerpt:

Open Science is shown to be moving centre-stage, with a rationale of improving efficiency in science; increasing transparency and quality in the research validation process; speeding the transfer of knowledge; increasing knowledge spill-overs to the economy; addressing global challenges more effectively; and promoting citizens' engagement in science and research.

Open Data is shown to have undergone a surge in practical development, mirroring the well established repositories for research outputs. The development and application of model policies and of principles is also discussed.

The current major developments in Open Access are discussed in detail, including the identification and mirroring of success factors in funders' and institutions' policies and mandates for driving Open Access deposits and the growth in Gold Open Access.

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"Tracing Digital Footprints to Academic Articles: An Investigation of PeerJ Publication Referral Data"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Social Media/Web 2.0 on January 22nd, 2016

Xianwen Wang, Shenmeng Xu, and Zhichao Fang have self-archived "Tracing Digital Footprints to Academic Articles: An Investigation of PeerJ Publication Referral Data."

Here's an excerpt:

In this study, we propose a novel way to explore the patterns of people's visits to academic articles. About 3.4 million links to referral source of visitors of 1432 papers published in the journal of PeerJ are collected and analyzed. We find that at least 57% visits are from external referral sources, among which General Search Engine, Social Network, and News & Blog are the top three categories of referrals. Academic Resource, including academic search engines and academic publishers' sites, is the fourth largest category of referral sources. In addition, our results show that Google contributes significantly the most in directing people to scholarly articles. . . . Correlation analysis and regression analysis indicates that papers with more mentions are expected to have more visitors, and Facebook, Twitter and Reddit are the most commonly used social networking tools that refer people to PeerJ.

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Putting Down Roots: Securing the Future of Open Access Policies

Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on January 22nd, 2016

Knowledge Exchange has released Putting Down Roots: Securing the Future of Open Access Policies.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The summary report; 'Putting down roots: Securing the future of open access policies' includes an analysis of a wide range of OA services and policies currently in use and presents:

  • an analysis of the common elements found in the current OA policies adopted by research funders and institutions
  • a set of case studies that illustrate the direct or indirect dependency of OA policies on key services
  • the views of stakeholders on the key services that enable compliance with OA policies
  • use cases, presented in accessible formats and language for a non-technical audience
  • a set of priorities for action if OA policies are to be successfully implemented

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"Academic Social Networks and Open Access: French Researchers at the Crossroads"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Social Media/Web 2.0 on January 20th, 2016

Christine Okret-Manville has published "Academic Social Networks and Open Access: French Researchers at the Crossroads" in LIBER Quarterly.

Here's an excerpt:

For some years, researchers have been using new ways to communicate and share their work by using academic social networks. In an attempt to foster the development of Open Access in France, the French consortium COUPERIN (Unified Consortium of Higher Education and Research Organizations for Access to Numerical Publications) proposed that academic social networks could be used to convince researchers of becoming more involved in Open Access. To test this hypothesis, a nationwide survey was launched in 2014 to explore whether and how these academic social networks are used to share content, but also how they compare to other Open Access classic tools. Within a month (20 May to 20 June), 1,898 researchers answered this 28-question survey. It was fully completed by 1,698 of them.

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"Open Data in Global Environmental Research: The Belmont Forum’s Open Data Survey"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science on January 20th, 2016

Birgit Schmidt, Birgit Gemeinholzer, and Andrew Treloar have published "Open Data in Global Environmental Research: The Belmont Forum's Open Data Survey" in PLOS ONE.

Here's an excerpt:

This paper presents the findings of the Belmont Forum's survey on Open Data which targeted the global environmental research and data infrastructure community. It highlights users' perceptions of the term "open data", expectations of infrastructure functionalities, and barriers and enablers for the sharing of data. A wide range of good practice examples was pointed out by the respondents which demonstrates a substantial uptake of data sharing through e-infrastructures and a further need for enhancement and consolidation. Among all policy responses, funder policies seem to be the most important motivator. This supports the conclusion that stronger mandates will strengthen the case for data sharing.

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"Publishing as Pedagogy: Connecting Library Services and Technology"

Posted in ARL Libraries, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on January 18th, 2016

Laurie Alexander et al. have published "Publishing as Pedagogy: Connecting Library Services and Technology" in EDUCAUSE Review.

Here's an excerpt:

In the following three case studies we profile three student publishing outputs (a journal, a book, and an exhibit) from the University of Michigan Library. Beyond describing the products themselves, we identify the opportunities that the librarians involved found to emphasize particular learning experiences during the creation process.

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"NIH Manuscript Collection Optimized for Text-Mining and More"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on December 7th, 2015

NIH has released "NIH Manuscript Collection Optimized for Text-Mining and More."

Here's an excerpt:

You can download the entire PMC collection of NIH-supported author manuscripts as a package in either XML or plain text formats. The collection will encompass all NIH manuscripts posted to PMC since July 2008. While the public can access the articles' full text and accompanying figures, tables, and multimedia on the PMC Web site, the newly available article packages include full text only, in a form that facilitates text-mining.

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"Text and Data Mining: Challenges and Solutions from the Publishers’ Perspective"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on December 4th, 2015

LIBER has released "Text and Data Mining: Challenges and Solutions from the Publishers' Perspective."

Here's an excerpt:

On 11 November, OpenMinTeD (a project in which LIBER participates) and Europeana organised a workshop titled 'Text and Data Mining in Europe: Challenges and Action'. The goal of the workshop was to bring together content providers (publishers, data centers, museums and libraries) who are open to making their data available for Text and Data Mining (TDM).

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"Open Access, Almost-OA, OA Policies, and Institutional Repositories"

Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on December 2nd, 2015

Richard Poynder has published "Open Access, Almost-OA, OA Policies, and Institutional Repositories" in Open and Shut?. This is part one of a planned two-part post.

Here's an excerpt:

First, I want to discuss how many of the documents indexed in "open" repositories are in fact freely available, rather than on "dark deposit" or otherwise inaccessible

Second, I want to look at the so-called eprint request Button, a tool developed to allow readers to obtain copies of items held on dark deposit in repositories.

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"Opening the Black Box of Scholarly Communication Funding: A Public Data Infrastructure for Financial Flows in Academic Publishing"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on December 2nd, 2015

Stuart Lawson et al. have self-archived "Opening the Black Box of Scholarly Communication Funding: A Public Data Infrastructure for Financial Flows in Academic Publishing."

Here's an excerpt:

In this paper we present work to trace and reassemble a picture of financial flows around the publication of journals in the UK in the midst of a national shift towards open access. We contend that the current lack of financial transparency around scholarly communication is an obstacle to evidence-based policy-making—leaving researchers, decision-makers and institutions in the dark about the systemic implications of new financial models. We conclude that obtaining a more joined up picture of financial flows is vital as a means for researchers, institutions and others to understand and shape changes to the sociotechnical systems that underpin scholarly communication.

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"CHORUS Gets a Boost from Federal Agencies—But Will New Approaches Make It Harder to Implement?"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on December 1st, 2015

Angela Cochran has published "CHORUS Gets a Boost from Federal Agencies—But Will New Approaches Make It Harder to Implement?" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

Today, CHORUS and the National Science Foundation (NSF) announced an agreement to use CHORUS for facilitating the discovery of NSF funded works. . . .

With the NSF on board, CHORUS has been given a big boost. However, it seems many publishers, whose membership dues are the only source of financial support for CHORUS, have been hanging back to see which agencies will participate.

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Using Open Educational Resources, UGA Saves Students $2 Million

Posted in Open Access on November 30th, 2015

From 2013-2016, the University of Georgia estimates that it has saved students $2 million .

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The University of Georgia is actively engaging in the promotion and adoption of OERs by providing faculty members, especially those who teach large enrollment courses, such as those included on the University System of Georgia Top-100 Undergraduate Enrollment list, with resources and assistance to transition away from expensive textbooks to open education resources. Since the OER initiative began in 2013, OERs will have saved UGA student $2 million in textbook costs by the end of 2015-2016.

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