Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

"PeerJ—A Case Study in Improving Research Collaboration at the Journal Level"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on December 4th, 2013

Peter Binfield has published "PeerJ—A Case Study in Improving Research Collaboration at the Journal Level" in the latest issue of Information Services & Use.

Here's an excerpt:

PeerJ Inc. is the Open Access publisher of PeerJ (a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal) and PeerJ PrePrints (an un-peer-reviewed or collaboratively reviewed preprint server), both serving the biological, medical and health sciences.

The Editorial Criteria of PeerJ (the journal) are similar to those of PLOS ONE in that all submissions are judged only on their scientic and methodological soundness (not on subjective determinations of impact, or degree of advance). PeerJ's peer-review process is managed by an Editorial Board of 800 and an Advisory Board of 20 (including 5 Nobel Laureates).

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    "The Political Economy of Federally Sponsored Data"

    Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Open Science on December 3rd, 2013

    Bart Ragon has published "The Political Economy of Federally Sponsored Data" in the latest issue of the Journal of eScience Librarianship.

    Here's an excerpt:

    Librarian involvement in the Open Access (OA) movement has traditionally focused on access to scholarly publications. Recent actions by the White House have focused attention on access on the data produced from federally sponsored research. Questions have emerged concerning access to the output of federally sponsored research and whether it is a public or private good. Understanding the political battle over access to federally funded research is closely tied to the ownership of the peer review process in higher education and associated revenue streams, and as a result, interest groups seeking to influence government regulation have politicized the issues. As a major funder of research in higher education, policies from the federal government are likely to drive change in research practices at higher education institutions and impact library services. The political economy of federally sponsored research data will shape research enterprises in higher education and inspire a number of new services distributed throughout the research life cycle.

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      "Green Open Access Policies of Scholarly Journal Publishers: A Study of What, When, and Where Self-Archiving Is Allowed"

      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on December 2nd, 2013

      Bo-Christer Björk, et al. have self-archived "Green Open Access Policies of Scholarly Journal Publishers: A Study of What, When, and Where Self-Archiving Is Allowed."

      Here's an excerpt:

      The degree to which scholarly journal articles published in subscription-based journals could be provided open access (OA) through publisher-permitted uploading to freely accessible web locations, so called green OA, is an underexplored area of research. This study combines article volume data originating from the Scopus bibliographic database with manually coded publisher policies of the 100 largest journal publishers measured by article output volume for the year 2010. Of the 1,1 million articles included in the analysis, 80.4% could be uploaded either as an accepted manuscript or publisher version to an institutional or subject repository after one year of publication. Publishers were found to be substantially more permissive with allowing accepted manuscripts on personal webpages (78.1% of articles) or in institutional repositories (79.9%) compared to subject repositories (32.8%). With previous studies suggesting realized green OA to be around 12% of total annual articles the results highlight the substantial unused potential for green OA.

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        Opening Science: The Evolving Guide on How the Internet Is Changing Research, Collaboration and Scholarly Publishing

        Posted in Open Access, Open Science on November 13th, 2013

        An open access, editable version of Opening Science: The Evolving Guide on How the Internet Is Changing Research, Collaboration and Scholarly Publishing is available.

        Here's an excerpt:

        This book will give researchers, scientists, decision makers, politicians, and stakeholders an overview on the basics, the tools, and the vision behind the current changes we see in the field of knowledge creation. It is meant as a starting point for readers to become an active part in the future of research and to become an informed party during the transition phase. This is pivotal, since research, as a sensitive, complex process with many facets and millions of participants, hierarchies, personal networks, and structures, needs informed participants.

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          Open Access Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences Conference 1 and 2 July 2013, The British Library, London

          Posted in Open Access, Reports and White Papers on November 13th, 2013

          JISC has released Open Access Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences Conference 1 and 2 July 2013, The British Library, London.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          The conference report provides an overview of all the presentations and sessions and distils the key messages into four points:

          • Open access for monographs is not only possible but necessary if we want to be able to innovate, to communicate and disseminate humanities and social science research widely, and to build a sustainable future for the monograph.
          • Effective quality assurance is key to the successful adoption of OA publishing.
          • Collaboration throughout the supply chain and across national boundaries will be required
          • We must be flexible and willing to accommodate innovative models, not only to sustain the monograph, but for peer review, impact and reputation.

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            "Open Access Publishing from the Legal Point of View. Why Freedom of Information Rules and Other Legal Principles Matter. Towards A New Fair Open Access Model."

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on November 8th, 2013

            Jiří Kolman and Petr Kolman have published "Open Access Publishing from the Legal Point of View. Why Freedom of Information Rules and Other Legal Principles Matter. Towards A New Fair Open Access Model." in tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique. Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society.

            Here's an excerpt:

            This article focuses on aspects that, as far as we know, have never been discussed in previous debates dealing with open access. The EU and national competition legal rules ensuring fair competition are a rather neglected aspect of open access. Another crucial topic is the unfairness of the current publication system. Why should commercial publishers be paid by publicly supported research such as EU or national research programmes? In the article a new publication model is suggested. The proposed model is trying to keep high research standards, to be fair to researchers and the public and to take into account the actual costs of the new open access model.

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              "Identifying the Effect of Open Access on Citations Using a Panel of Science Journals"

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on November 7th, 2013

              Mark J. McCabe and Christopher M. Snyder have self-archived "Identifying the Effect of Open Access on Citations Using a Panel of Science Journals." in SSRN

              Here's an excerpt:

              An open-access journal allows free online access to its articles, obtaining revenue from fees charged to submitting authors or from institutional support. Using panel data on science journals, we are able to circumvent problems plaguing previous studies of the impact of open access on citations. In contrast to the huge effects found in these previous studies, we find a more modest effect: moving from paid to open access increases cites by 8% on average in our sample. The benefit is concentrated among top-ranked journals. In fact, open access causes a statistically significant reduction in cites to the bottom-ranked journals in our sample, leading us to conjecture that open access may intensify competition among articles for readers' attention, generating losers as well as winners.

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                "Going for Gold: An Investigation into Financial Models of Open Access Publishing in Biology"

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on November 6th, 2013

                Lucy van Dorp has self-archived her master's thesis "Going for Gold: An Investigation into Financial Models of Open Access Publishing in Biology"

                Here's an excerpt:

                Using the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) as an entry point, this study considers the numbers of OA journals in the life and biological sciences along with the proportion using an author-pays model. It considers how impact factor is related to business model, in particular author fees2, using data from the 2011 Journal Citation Reports (JCR, 2011) and SCImago Journal and Country Rank (SCImago); data for year 2011; retrieved in 2012. The most prominent publishing organisations are considered in depth looking explicitly at the income sources making up revenue. The study concludes with comments from three industry specialists on their views on the future of academic publishing, the place of subscription-based journals and what their own organisation is doing to allow sustainable, barrier-free literature dissemination.

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