Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

"Data Rights and Responsibilities: A Human Rights Perspective on Data Sharing"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Open Access, Open Science on September 11th, 2015

Theresa L. Harris and Jessica M. Wyndham have published "Data Rights and Responsibilities: A Human Rights Perspective on Data Sharing " in the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics.

Here's an excerpt:

A human-rights-based analysis can be a useful tool for the scientific community and policy makers as they develop codes of conduct, harmonized standards, and national policies for data sharing. The human rights framework provides a shared set of values and norms across borders, defines rights and responsibilities of various actors involved in data sharing, addresses the potential harms as well as the benefits of data sharing, and offers a framework for balancing competing values. The right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications offers a particularly helpful lens through which to view data as both a tool of scientific inquiry to which access is vital and as a product of science from which everyone should benefit.

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Dspace@MIT: 17,400 Articles Deposited and over 3.3 Million Downloads

Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on September 10th, 2015

MIT's Dspace@MIT has had 17,400 articles deposited and over 3.3 million downloads.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

A new milestone was reached in collecting articles under the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy : 43% of the articles published by faculty since they adopted their Policy are now being shared through the Open Access Articles Collection in Dspace@MIT.

As of the end of July 2015, downloads of the 17,400 articles deposited in relation to the Policy topped 3.3 million, with over 83,500 downloads during the month.

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"The Share of Open Access Journals (OAJ) and Open Access Articles (OAA) Charging Article Processing Charges (APC). Data from the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) 2013 to 2015"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 9th, 2015

Falk Reckling has published "The Share of Open Access Journals (OAJ) and Open Access Articles (OAA) Charging Article Processing Charges (APC). Data from the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) 2013 to 2015" in The Journal of Brief Ideas.

Here's an excerpt:

83.0% (186) of the OAJ charge APC, while 17.0% (38) of the OAJ don't. On the article level, 93.6% (683) of the articles were published with and 6.4% (47) without APC.

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"The Rutgers Open Access Policy: Implementation Planning for Success"

Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on September 8th, 2015

Laura Bowering Mullen and Jane Johnson Otto have self-archived "The Rutgers Open Access Policy: Implementation Planning for Success."

Here's an excerpt:

At Rutgers University, an open access resolution was passed by the University Senate in October, 2012, and was codified in the official Rutgers University Policy Library in October, 2014. All of the work that the authors coordinated to get to the point of passing the policy was only the beginning of making open access a reality at Rutgers. Since the date that the policy has passed, the authors have been leading an implementation effort (using an established timeline) which includes a new web portal for scholarship, as well as developing materials and presentations for various open access policy-focused education and outreach efforts.. . . The authors provide background and a case study to illustrate the implementation efforts underway as Rutgers comes closer to the official date that the policy will go into effect university-wide on Sept. 1, 2015.

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"Barriers to Open Access Publishing: Views from the Library Literature"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 4th, 2015

Amy Forrester has published "Barriers to Open Access Publishing: Views from the Library Literature" in Publications.

Here's an excerpt:

The library and information science (LIS) community has an active role in supporting access to information and, therefore, is an important stakeholder in the open access conversation. One major discussion involves the barriers that have hindered the complete transition to open access in scientific publications. Building upon a longitudinal study by Bo-Christer Björk that looked at barriers to the open access publishing of scholarly articles, this study evaluates the discussion of those barriers in the LIS literature over the ten year period 2004-2014, and compares this to Björk's conclusions about gold open access publishing.

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"Open Access to a High-Quality, Impartial, Point-of-Care Medical Summary Would Save Lives: Why Does It Not Exist?"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing on September 1st, 2015

James Heilman has published "Open Access to a High-Quality, Impartial, Point-of-Care Medical Summary Would Save Lives: Why Does It Not Exist?" in PLOS Medicine.

Here's an excerpt:

Summary Points

  • Currently no open access point-of-care (POC) medical summary aimed at a professional audience exists.
  • Some nonprofit and multiple professional, for-profit POC medical summaries are frequently accessed by clinicians and policymakers.
  • Efforts to create open access POC summaries have been stymied by the difficulty of attracting high-quality contributors.
  • The open access medical publishing community can create this resource with engaged donors, crowd-sourcing, and technology.

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Open Science, Open Questions

Posted in Open Access, Open Science on August 31st, 2015

IBICT and Unirio have released Open Science, Open Questions.

Here's an excerpt:

It is hoped that this publication will provide an overview of topics and issues that both trace and permeate the topic of open science nowadays from different perspectives and points of view. Above all, it is hoped that it might instigate further reflection and foster new ways of producing and circulating knowledge. Thus, it is geared not only towards the academic world, but also to a broader range of social actors that concern themselves with the democratisation of knowledge and information.

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"Is it True that Most Open Access Journals Do Not Charge an APC? Sort of. It Depends."

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 28th, 2015

David Crotty has published "Is it True that Most Open Access Journals Do Not Charge an APC? Sort of. It Depends." in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

Most journals in the study ["72% and 41%: A Gold OA 2011-2014 Preview"] do not charge authors, but the majority of authors are choosing to publish in journals that do charge. 27% (2,365) of the journals studied required an APC and were responsible for 57% of the articles.

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Enquiries Into Intellectual Property’s Economic Impact

Posted in Copyright, Open Access, Reports and White Papers on August 28th, 2015

OECD has released Enquiries Into Intellectual Property's Economic Impact.

Here's an excerpt from "Chapter 7: Legal Aspects of Open Access to Publicly Funded Research":

To explain the interplay between open access and IP laws, this chapter provides an overview of the IP regimes that protect research outputs in a sample of OECD jurisdictions. It then reviews the open access policies that are in place in some of those jurisdictions and examines two contexts in which IP questions can arise when open access principles are applied: public/private partnerships and text and data mining.

Also of interest: "Chapter 5: Copyright in the Digital Era: Country Studies."

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"Open Journal Systems and Dataverse Integration—Helping Journals to Upgrade Data Publication for Reusable Research"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Source Software, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 26th, 2015

Micah Altman et al. have self-archived "Open Journal Systems and Dataverse Integration—Helping Journals to Upgrade Data Publication for Reusable Research."

Here's an excerpt:

This article describes the novel open source tools for open data publication in open access journal workflows. This comprises a plugin for Open Journal Systems that supports a data submission, citation, review, and publication workflow; and an extension to the Dataverse system that provides a standard deposit API. We describe the function and design of these tools, provide examples of their use, and summarize their initial reception. We conclude by discussing future plans and potential impact.

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The Once and Future Publishing Library

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Communication on August 3rd, 2015

The Council on Library and Information Resources has released The Once and Future Publishing Library .

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The report explores the revitalization of library publishing and its possible future, and examines elements that influence the success and sustainability of library publishing initiatives.

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"Small Steps Matter: FASTR Passes Senate Committee Hurdle"

Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 31st, 2015

SPARC has released Small Steps Matter: FASTR Passes Senate Committee Hurdle by Heather Joseph.

Here's an excerpt:

With its action today, the Senate Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs Committee (HSGAC) advanced the cause of public access to publicly funded research articles another crucial step. In a unanimous voice vote, the Committee approved S. 779, the Fair Access to Science and Technology Research (FASTR) Act which now positions the legislation to be considered by the full Senate.

This marks the first time that a U.S. Senate Committee has acted on a government-wide policy ensuring public access to the results of publicly funded research and signals that there is deep support for the ideal that taxpayers have the right to access to the research that their tax dollars fund. This action continues the steady march towards enabling fast, barrier-free access to research articles that got its start with the establishment of a voluntary NIH policy in 2005, and slowly progressed with legislation shifting that policy to mandatory in 2008, again in 2010 with the America COMPETES Act and most recently with the 2013 White House OSTP Directive on public access. . . .

Today's progress on FASTR is another step in this long march. Under the leadership of Senator Cornyn (R-TX) and Senator Wyden (D-OR), FASTR provides the statutory framework needed codify the White House OSTP Directive, which was issued with the goal of accelerating scientific discovery and fueling innovation. While 13 federal agencies and departments have released their initial plans, the reality is that the OSTP Directive is not law, and can be easily overturned by a subsequent Administration. Should FASTR continue on course and be passed by both chambers of Congress, free, fair public access to research articles will become the law of the land – and not just the preference a President.

See also: "Cornyn Bill To Improve Access To Taxpayer-Funded Research Passes Committee Unanimously."

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