Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

"AHRQ, NASA, USDA Release Plans for Public Access to Funded Research"

Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 23rd, 2015

ARL has released AHRQ, NASA, USDA Release Plans for Public Access to Funded Research.

Here's an excerpt:

Three US Government agencies-the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA)-recently released their plans for increasing public access to federally funded research in response to the 2013 White House Office of Science & Technology Policy (OSTP) directive. The OSTP memorandum directed federal agencies with R&D budgets of $100 million or more to develop plans to make the published results of federally funded research freely available to the public within one year of publication.

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    Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Adopts Open Access Mandate

    Posted in Open Access on February 10th, 2015

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, an agency within the United States Department of Health and Human Services, has adopted an open access mandate.

    Here's an excerpt:

    For scholarly publications, the AHRQ Public Access Policy will require that authors submit the final peer-reviewed accepted journal manuscripts to PubMed Central (PMC). In lieu of the final peer-reviewed manuscript, AHRQ will accept the final published article, provided the awardee can ensure AHRQ has the rights to make the published version public. AHRQ's Public Access Policy is subject to law; Agency mission; resource constraints; U.S. national, homeland, and economic security; and the objectives listed in the OSTP directive.

    To the extent feasible and consistent with applicable law and policy; Agency mission; resource constraints; U.S. national, homeland, and economic security; and the objectives listed below, digitally formatted scientific data resulting from unclassified research supported wholly or in part by Federal funding should be stored and publicly accessible to search, retrieve, and analyze. For sharing of data in digital format, all AHRQ-funded researchers will be required to include a data management plan for sharing final research data in digital format, or state why data sharing is not possible.

    Peter Suber has critiqued the mandate.

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      "Open Access Article Processing Charges: DOAJ Survey May 2014"

      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 10th, 2015

      Heather Morrison et al. have published "Open Access Article Processing Charges: DOAJ Survey May 2014" in Publications.

      Here's an excerpt:

      As of May 2014, the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) listed close to ten thousand fully open access, peer reviewed, scholarly journals. Most of these journals do not charge article processing charges (APCs). This article reports the results of a survey of the 2567 journals, or 26% of journals listed in DOAJ, that do have APCs based on a sample of 1432 of these journals. Results indicate a volatile sector that would make future APCs difficult to predict for budgeting purposes. DOAJ and publisher title lists often did not closely match. A number of journals were found on examination not to have APCs. A wide range of publication costs was found for every publisher type. The average (mean) APC of $964 contrasts with a mode of $0. At least 61% of publishers using APCs are commercial in nature, while many publishers are of unknown types. The vast majority of journals charging APCs (80%) were found to offer one or more variations on pricing, such as discounts for authors from mid to low income countries, differential pricing based on article type, institutional or society membership, and/or optional charges for extras such as English language editing services or fast track of articles. The complexity and volatility of this publishing landscape is discussed.

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        COAR Roadmap: Future Directions for Repository Interoperability

        Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Reports and White Papers on February 6th, 2015

        COAR has released COAR Roadmap: Future Directions for Repository Interoperability.

        Here's an excerpt:

        Scholarly communication is undergoing fundamental changes, in particular with new requirements for open access to research outputs, new forms of peer-review, and alternative methods for measuring impact. In parallel, technical developments, especially in communication and interface technologies facilitate bi-directional data exchange across related applications and systems. The aim of this roadmap is to identify important trends and their associated action points in order for the repository community to determine priorities for further investments in interoperability.

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          Managing Open Access Publication: A System Specification

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries on February 6th, 2015

          JISC Monitor has released Managing Open Access Publication: A System Specification.

          Here's an excerpt:

          The purpose of this document is to provide a specification for a system to help UK HE institutions manage administrative data in relation to the publication of open access Academic Outputs. The document is intended to:

          • Describe the scope of such a system and the workflows it should support
          • Describe an appropriate data model given the scope and workflows
          • Provide illustrative wireframes for a user interface (UI) to such a system

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            "One More Chunk of DOAJ"

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 5th, 2015

            Walt Crawford has published "One More Chunk of DOAJ" in Cites & Insights Crawford at Large.

            Here's an excerpt:

            Because there will be a published concise version of all this stuff—out this summer from ALA's Library Technology Reports, working title "Idealism and Opportunism: The State of Open Access Journals"—I went through 2,200-odd additional DOAJ journals with English as one of the language options (but not the first one), and was able to add 1,507 more entries to my DOAJ master spreadsheet, which now includes 6,490 journals qualifying for full analysis and 811 that don't. This essay offers some summary information on the 1,507 added journals and some overall notes on the full DOAJ set-including some new and replacement tables (there may be errors in tables 2.66 b and c and 2.67 b and c in earlier issues).

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              "Who Should We Trust?"

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing on February 2nd, 2015

              Kevin Smith has published "Who Should We Trust?" in Scholarly Communications @ Duke.

              Here's an excerpt:

              It is not that we exactly trust commercial publishers, nor do we exactly distrust them. We may recognize that the values and goals of the commercial publishing business are different from, and even in conflict with, the best interests of scholarly authors and of scholarship itself. Perfectly nice people, working to advance their own interests as best they can, come in to conflict as the conditions for research and teaching change. And a real ambivalence is created because of how interwoven the parts of the academic enterprise are. More than just inertia is a work; important aspects of the academic enterprise remain interlocked with traditional forms of publication.

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                "PeerJ—A PLOS ONE Contender in 2015?"

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on February 2nd, 2015

                Phil Davis has published "PeerJ—A PLOS ONE Contender in 2015?" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

                Here's an excerpt:

                In my last post, I reported that PeerJ was growing, publishing more papers and attracting more authors, although it was not clear whether the company was moving toward financial stability. In a crowded market of multidisciplinary open access journals, I argued that the success (or failure) of PeerJ would be determined when it received its first Impact Factor, which will be announced in mid-June with the publication of Thomson Reuters' Journal Citation Report. The purpose of this post is to estimate PeerJ's first Impact Factor and discuss its implications.

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