Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

SPARC Call to Action for California Taxpayer Access to Publicly Funded Research Act (AB 609)

Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access on June 19th, 2013

SPARC has issued a call to action for the California Taxpayer Access to Publicly Funded Research Act (AB 609).

Here's an excerpt:

The California Taxpayer Access to Publicly Funded Research Legislation (AB 609) was introduced into the California State Legislature in April of 2013 by Assembly Member Brian Nestande. On May 30th, AB 609 was passed by the California State Assembly by a wide, bipartisan 71-7 margin. It will be heard in the California State Senate Committee on Governmental Organization on Tuesday, May 25th at 9:30am PST.

If you are a California resident, visit our Legislative Action Center to write your state representatives in support of AB 609.

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    Incentives, Integration, and Mediation: Sustainable Practices for Populating Repositories

    Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on June 19th, 2013

    The Confederation of Open Access Repositories has released Incentives, Integration, and Mediation: Sustainable Practices for Populating Repositories.

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    There is an active, thriving community of open access repositories worldwide and their visibility is rising as funding agencies and governments implement open access policies. Still, repositories must continue to adopt strategies that demonstrate their value to the wider research community. Therefore COAR has now published the report, "Incentives, Integration, and Mediation: Sustainable Practices for Population Repositories". It profiles a variety of successful practices for populating repositories from around the world. Aim of the report is to assist the global repository community in implementing sustainable methods for recruiting content. The profiles were gathered from organizations across the globe, and represent a mixture of approaches involving the introduction of incentives; integration of the repository with other institutional services; and/or mediation of the deposit process. The practices reflect a tradition of innovation and openness in the repository community, and are characterized by creative approaches to staffing, imaginative software developments, and adoption of novel policies.

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      "arXiv E-prints and the Journal of Record: An Analysis of Roles and Relationships"

      Posted in Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on June 18th, 2013

      Vincent Lariviere, Cassidy R. Sugimoto, Benoit Macaluso, Stasa Milojevic, Blaise Cronin, and Mike Thelwall have self-archived "arXiv E-prints and the Journal of Record: An Analysis of Roles and Relationships" in arXiv.org.

      Here's an excerpt:

      Since its creation in 1991, arXiv has become central to the diffusion of research in a number of fields. Combining data from the entirety of arXiv and the Web of Science (WoS), this paper investigates (a) the proportion of papers across all disciplines that are on arXiv and the proportion of arXiv papers that are in the WoS, (b) elapsed time between arXiv submission and journal publication, and (c) the aging characteristics and scientific impact of arXiv e-prints and their published version. It shows that the proportion of WoS papers found on arXiv varies across the specialties of physics and mathematics, and that only a few specialties make extensive use of the repository. Elapsed time between arXiv submission and journal publication has shortened but remains longer in mathematics than in physics. In physics, mathematics, as well as in astronomy and astrophysics, arXiv versions are cited more promptly and decay faster than WoS papers. The arXiv versions of papers – both published and unpublished – have lower citation rates than published papers, although there is almost no difference in the impact of the arXiv versions of both published and unpublished papers.

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        "A Look Back at 24 Years as an Open Access Publisher"

        Posted in Bibliographies, Digital Scholarship Publications, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on June 17th, 2013

        Digital Scholarship has released "A Look Back at 24 Years as an Open Access Publisher" by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

        Here's an excerpt:

        Imagine the Internet without the Web. Imagine that there is no Google or similar search engine. Imagine that the cutting edge Internet applications are e-mail and LISTSERVs, FTP, and Telnet (terminal sessions). Imagine that the Internet is made up of a number of different networks, and that the connections between them are not always transparent. Imagine that no established publisher has even experimented with an e-journal.

        That was the situation in June 1989 when I launched PACS-L, a LISTSERV mailing list. PACS-L was one of the first library-oriented mailing lists, and it was unusual in that it had a broad subject focus (public-access computer systems in libraries). Although PACS-L's greatest contribution may have been in raising librarians' awareness of the importance and potential of the then fledgling Internet, it was also the platform on which my initial scholarly digital publishing efforts were based.

        In August 1989, I launched The Public-Access Computer Systems Review, one of the first e-journals on the Internet and the first open access journal in the field of library and information science. It was freely available, allowed authors to retain their copyrights, and had special copyright provisions for noncommercial use. Issues were announced via e-mail, and articles were distributed as ASCII files from a LISTSERV. Starting in 1994, ASCII articles were also distributed via a Gopher server. In 1995, a website was established, and articles were also distributed as HTML files.

        I edited the The Public-Access Computer Systems Review through 1996. By the end of that year, there had been over 4.2 million requests for the journal's files.

        In 1996, I established the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, an open access e-book that had 79 subsequent versions. It was initially published in the HTML, PDF, and Word formats.

        These early digital publishing projects were sponsored by the University of Houston Libraries, which maintains an archive of ASCII articles from The Public-Access Computer Systems Review (http://journals.tdl.org/pacsr/index.php/pacsr). The PACS-L archive was deleted in 2013 when the list shut down.

        In 1995, I established Digital Scholarship (http://digital-scholarship.org/), and I began to publish open access works under Creative Commons licenses. By 2013, Digital Scholarship was publishing PDF books, inexpensive paperback books, XHTML bibliographies, weblogs, Twitter streams, and other works.

        The last version of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography was published in 2011 (http://digital-scholarship.org/sepb/sepb.html). From 1996 through 2011, the e-book had over 11.9 million file requests.

        From April 2005 through May 2013, Digital Scholarship had over 12.2 million visitors from 229 counties and over 58.7 million file requests.

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          G8 Science Ministers Issue Statement Supporting Open Access

          Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 14th, 2013

          The G8 science ministers have issued a statement that includes sections supporting open access.

          Here's an excerpt:

          Open enquiry is at the heart of scientific endeavour, and rapid technological change has profound implications for the way that science is both conducted and its results communicated. It can provide society with the necessary information to solve global challenges. We are committed to openness in scientific research data to speed up the progress of scientific discovery, create innovation, ensure that the results of scientific research are as widely available as practical, enable transparency in science and engage the public in the scientific process. We have decided to support the set of principles for open scientific research data outlined below as a basis for further discussions.

          i. To the greatest extent and with the fewest constraints possible publicly funded scientific research data should be open, while at the same time respecting concerns in relation to privacy, safety, security and commercial interests, whilst acknowledging the legitimate concerns of private partners.

          ii. Open scientific research data should be easily discoverable, accessible, assessable, intelligible, useable, and wherever possible interoperable to specific quality standards.

          iii. To maximise the value that can be realised from data, the mechanisms for delivering open scientific research data should be efficient and cost effective, and consistent with the potential benefits.

          iv. To ensure successful adoption by scientific communities, open scientific research data principles will need to be underpinned by an appropriate policy environment, including recognition of researchers fulfilling these principles, and appropriate digital infrastructure.

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            Directory of Open Access Journals Releases New Selection Criteria Draft

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 13th, 2013

            The Directory of Open Access Journals has released a draft of its new journal selection criteria .

            Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

            We have tried to construct objective criteria that can facilitate compliance verification easily. In order to be listed in the DOAJ, a journal must meet the following criteria:

            • Journal will be asked to provide basic information (title, ISSN, etc.), contact information, and information about journal policies
            • Journal is registered with SHERPA/RoMEO
            • Journal has an editorial board with clearly identifiable members (including affiliation information)
            • Journal publishes a minimum of five articles per year (does not apply for new journals)
            • Allows use and reuse at least at the following levels (as specified in the Open Access Spectrum, http://www.plos.org/about/open-access/howopenisit/ ):
              • Full text, metadata, and citations of articles can be crawled and accessed with permission (Machine Readability Level 4)
              • Provides free readership rights to all articles immediately upon publication (Reader Rights Level 1)
              • Reuse is subject to certain restrictions; no remixing (Reuse Rights Level 3)
              • Allow authors to retain copyright in their article with no restrictions (Copyrights Level 1)
              • Author can post the final, peer-reviewed manuscript version (postprint) to any repository or website (Author Posting Rights Level 2)

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              Association of American Publishers: "Understanding CHORUS"

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 10th, 2013

              The Association of American Publishers has released "Understanding CHORUS."

              Here's an excerpt:

              The Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States (CHORUS) is a framework for a possible public-private partnership to increase public access to peer-reviewed publications that report on federally-funded research. Conceived by publishers, CHORUS would:

              • Provide a full solution for agencies to comply with the OSTP memo on public access to peer-reviewed scientific publications reporting on federally-funded research
              • Build on publishers' existing infrastructure to enhance public access to research literature, avoiding duplication of effort, minimizing cost to the government and ensuring the continued availability of the research literature
              • Serve the public by creating a streamlined, cohesive way to expand access to peer-reviewed articles reporting on federally-funded research. Reflecting the OSTP memo, CHORUS will present and preserve these as digital form, final peer-reviewed manuscripts or final published documents

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                AAU, APLU, and ARL: Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE) Proposal

                Posted in ARL Libraries, Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 10th, 2013

                The Association of American Universities, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, and ARL have released a draft of the Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE) proposal.

                Here's an excerpt:

                Research universities are long-lived and are mission-driven to generate, make accessible, and preserve over time new knowledge and understanding. Research universities collectively have the assets needed for a national solution for enhanced public access to federally funded research output. As the principal producers of the resources that are to be made publicly available under the new White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP)[1] memorandum, and that are critical to the continuing success of higher education in the United States, universities have invested in the infrastructure, tools, and services necessary to provide effective and efficient access to their research and scholarship. The new White House directive provides a compelling reason to integrate higher education's investments to date into a system of cross-institutional digital repositories that will be known as Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE).

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