Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

G8 Science Ministers Issue Statement Supporting Open Access

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 14th, 2013

The G8 science ministers have issued a statement that includes sections supporting open access.

Here's an excerpt:

Open enquiry is at the heart of scientific endeavour, and rapid technological change has profound implications for the way that science is both conducted and its results communicated. It can provide society with the necessary information to solve global challenges. We are committed to openness in scientific research data to speed up the progress of scientific discovery, create innovation, ensure that the results of scientific research are as widely available as practical, enable transparency in science and engage the public in the scientific process. We have decided to support the set of principles for open scientific research data outlined below as a basis for further discussions.

i. To the greatest extent and with the fewest constraints possible publicly funded scientific research data should be open, while at the same time respecting concerns in relation to privacy, safety, security and commercial interests, whilst acknowledging the legitimate concerns of private partners.

ii. Open scientific research data should be easily discoverable, accessible, assessable, intelligible, useable, and wherever possible interoperable to specific quality standards.

iii. To maximise the value that can be realised from data, the mechanisms for delivering open scientific research data should be efficient and cost effective, and consistent with the potential benefits.

iv. To ensure successful adoption by scientific communities, open scientific research data principles will need to be underpinned by an appropriate policy environment, including recognition of researchers fulfilling these principles, and appropriate digital infrastructure.

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    Directory of Open Access Journals Releases New Selection Criteria Draft

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 13th, 2013

    The Directory of Open Access Journals has released a draft of its new journal selection criteria .

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    We have tried to construct objective criteria that can facilitate compliance verification easily. In order to be listed in the DOAJ, a journal must meet the following criteria:

    • Journal will be asked to provide basic information (title, ISSN, etc.), contact information, and information about journal policies
    • Journal is registered with SHERPA/RoMEO
    • Journal has an editorial board with clearly identifiable members (including affiliation information)
    • Journal publishes a minimum of five articles per year (does not apply for new journals)
    • Allows use and reuse at least at the following levels (as specified in the Open Access Spectrum, http://www.plos.org/about/open-access/howopenisit/ ):
      • Full text, metadata, and citations of articles can be crawled and accessed with permission (Machine Readability Level 4)
      • Provides free readership rights to all articles immediately upon publication (Reader Rights Level 1)
      • Reuse is subject to certain restrictions; no remixing (Reuse Rights Level 3)
      • Allow authors to retain copyright in their article with no restrictions (Copyrights Level 1)
      • Author can post the final, peer-reviewed manuscript version (postprint) to any repository or website (Author Posting Rights Level 2)

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      Association of American Publishers: "Understanding CHORUS"

      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 10th, 2013

      The Association of American Publishers has released "Understanding CHORUS."

      Here's an excerpt:

      The Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States (CHORUS) is a framework for a possible public-private partnership to increase public access to peer-reviewed publications that report on federally-funded research. Conceived by publishers, CHORUS would:

      • Provide a full solution for agencies to comply with the OSTP memo on public access to peer-reviewed scientific publications reporting on federally-funded research
      • Build on publishers' existing infrastructure to enhance public access to research literature, avoiding duplication of effort, minimizing cost to the government and ensuring the continued availability of the research literature
      • Serve the public by creating a streamlined, cohesive way to expand access to peer-reviewed articles reporting on federally-funded research. Reflecting the OSTP memo, CHORUS will present and preserve these as digital form, final peer-reviewed manuscripts or final published documents

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        AAU, APLU, and ARL: Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE) Proposal

        Posted in ARL Libraries, Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 10th, 2013

        The Association of American Universities, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, and ARL have released a draft of the Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE) proposal.

        Here's an excerpt:

        Research universities are long-lived and are mission-driven to generate, make accessible, and preserve over time new knowledge and understanding. Research universities collectively have the assets needed for a national solution for enhanced public access to federally funded research output. As the principal producers of the resources that are to be made publicly available under the new White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP)[1] memorandum, and that are critical to the continuing success of higher education in the United States, universities have invested in the infrastructure, tools, and services necessary to provide effective and efficient access to their research and scholarship. The new White House directive provides a compelling reason to integrate higher education's investments to date into a system of cross-institutional digital repositories that will be known as Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE).

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          "Repository of NSF-Funded Publications and Related Datasets: ‘Back of Envelope’ Cost Estimate for 15 Years"

          Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Open Access on June 7th, 2013

          Beth Plale, Inna Kouper, Kurt Seiffert, and Stacy Konkiel have self-archived "Repository of NSF-Funded Publications and Related Datasets: 'Back of Envelope' Cost Estimate for 15 Years" in IUScholarWorks.

          Here's an excerpt:

          The total projected cost of the data and paper repository is estimated at $167,000,000 over 15 years of operation, curating close to one million of datasets and one million papers. After 15 years and 30 PB of data accumulated and curated, we estimate the cost per gigabyte at $5.56. This $167 million cost is a direct cost in that it does not include federally allowable indirect costs return (ICR). After 15 years, it is reasonable to assume that some datasets will be compressed and rarely accessed. Others may be deemed no longer valuable, e.g., because they are replaced by more accurate results. Therefore, at some point the data growth in the repository will need to be adjusted by use of strategic preservation.

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            "Delayed Open Access—An Overlooked High-Impact Category of Openly Available Scientific Literature"

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 6th, 2013

            Mikael Laakso and Bo-Christer Björk have self-archived "Delayed Open Access—An Overlooked High-Impact Category of Openly Available Scientific Literature."

            Here's an excerpt:

            Delayed open access (OA) refers to scholarly articles in subscription journals made available openly on the web directly through the publisher at the expiry of a set embargo period. Though a substantial number of journals have practiced delayed OA since they started publishing e-versions, empirical studies concerning open access have often overlooked this body of literature. This study provides comprehensive quantitative measurements by identifying delayed OA journals, collecting data concerning their publication volumes, embargo lengths, and citation rates. Altogether 492 journals were identified, publishing a combined total of 111 312 articles in 2011. 77,8 % of these articles were made open access within 12 months from publication, with 85,4 % becoming available within 24 months. A journal impact factor analysis revealed that delayed OA journals have on average twice as high average citation rates compared to closed subscription journals, and three times as high as immediate OA journals. Overall the results demonstrate that delayed OA journals constitute an important segment of the openly available scholarly journal literature, both by their sheer article volume as well as by including a substantial proportion of high impact journals.

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              Publishers Put Forward Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States Proposal

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 5th, 2013

              A group of scholarly publishers has put forward a proposal to establish a Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States.

              Here is a list of key posts about the proposal:

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                "Economics of Scholarly Communication in Transition"

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on June 4th, 2013

                Heather Morrison has published "Economics of Scholarly Communication in Transition" in the latest issue of First Monday.

                Here's an excerpt:

                Academic library budgets are the primary source of revenue for scholarly journal publishing. There is more than enough money in the budgets of academic libraries to fund a fully open access scholarly journal publishing system. Seeking efficiencies, such as a reasonable average cost per article, will be key to a successful transition. This article presents macro level economic data and analysis illustrating the key factors and potential for cost savings.

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