Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

"Institutional Repositories: Exploration of Costs and Value"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access on January 16th, 2013

Sean Burns, Amy Lana, and John M. Budd have published "Institutional Repositories: Exploration of Costs and Value" in the latest issue of D-Lib Magazine.

Here's an excerpt:

Little is known about the costs academic libraries incur to implement and manage institutional repositories and the value these institutional repositories offer to their communities. To address this, the authors report the findings of their 29 question survey of academic libraries with institutional repositories. . . . The highlights of our findings, based on median values, suggest that institutions that mediate submissions incur less expense than institutions that allow self-archiving, institutions that offer additional services incur greater annual operating costs than those who do not, and institutions that use open source applications have lower implementation costs but comparable annual operating costs with institutions that use proprietary solutions. Furthermore, changes in budgeting, from special initiative to absorption into the regular budget, suggest a trend in sustainable support for institutional repositories.

| Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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    "Cost-Effectiveness of Open Access Publications"

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on January 16th, 2013

    Jevin West, Theodore Bergstrom, and Carl T. Bergstrom have self-archived "Cost-Effectiveness of Open Access Publications" at eigenfactor.org.

    Here's an excerpt:

    Open access publishing has been proposed as one possible solution to the serials crisis—the rapidly growing subscription prices in scholarly journal publishing. However, open access publishing can present economic pitfalls as well, such as excessive publication charges. We discuss the decision that an author faces when choosing to submit to an open access journal. We develop an interactive tool to help authors compare among alternative open access venues and thereby get the most for their publication fees.

    | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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      Organization of Scholarly Communication Services, SPEC Kit 332

      Posted in Copyright, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Communication on December 14th, 2012

      ARL has released the Organization of Scholarly Communication Services, SPEC Kit 332.

      Here's an excerpt from the press release:

      The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) has published Organization of Scholarly Communication Services, SPEC Kit 332, which explores how research institutions are currently organizing staff to support scholarly communication services, and whether their organizational structures have changed since 2007, when member libraries were surveyed about their scholarly communication education initiatives. This SPEC Kit covers who leads scholarly communication efforts inside and outside the library, the scholarly communication related services that are offered to researchers, and which staff support those services. The publication also looks at how the library measures the success of its scholarly communication services, including demonstrable outcomes of these services.

      | Digital Scholarship's 2012 Publications | Digital Scholarship |

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        "Examining Attributes of Open Standard File Formats for Long-Term Preservation and Open Access"

        Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Open Access on December 13th, 2012

        Eun G. Park and Sam Oh have published "Examining Attributes of Open Standard File Formats for Long-Term Preservation and Open Access" in the latest issue of Information Technology and Libraries.

        Here's an excerpt:

        This study examines the attributes that have been used to assess file formats in literature and compiles the most frequently used attributes of file formats in order to establish open standard file format selection criteria. A comprehensive review was undertaken to identify the current knowledge regarding file format selection criteria. The findings indicate that the most common criteria can be categorized into five major groups: functionality, metadata, openness, interoperability and independence. These attributes appear to be closely related. Additional attributes include presentation, authenticity, adoption, protection, preservation, reference and others.

        | Digital Curation Resource Guide | Digital Scholarship |

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          MedOANet Releases Open Access Tracker

          Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on December 12th, 2012

          MedOANet has released the Open Access Tracker.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          MedOANet (Mediterranean Open Access Network) is a two-year project funded under the Science in Society Programme of the EC 7th Framework Programme. The project enhances existing policies, strategies and structures for Open Access and contributes towards the implementation of new ones in six Mediterranean countries: Greece, Turkey, Italy, France, Spain, Portugal. . . .

          The Open Access Tracker brings together information on journals, repositories, institutional policies, funder's policies and publishers' self-archiving policies, representing Open Access activities in the six countries.

          Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals Cover

          | Digital Scholarship |

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            Amherst College Establishes Open Access Press

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, University Presses on December 7th, 2012

            Amherst College has established an open access press, the Amherst College Press.

            Here's an excerpt from the press release:

            Conceived by Amherst College Librarian Bryn Geffert, Amherst College Press will be housed in the college's Frost Library and will solicit manuscripts from scholars who may be especially receptive to new publishing paradigms at a time when traditional academic presses are reducing the number of titles they publish. . . .

            At the outset, Amherst College Press will publish solely in liberal arts disciplines such as political science, literary studies, history, economics and anthropology—areas for which Amherst is well known. The press will produce books in formats that will be suitable for most e-readers; print-on-demand may be available. The press will not focus on print production or distribution. . . .

            Funding for the press will come from the Frost Library and from an endowed position for which the college is currently raising money. The college also expects that the content of the Amherst College-affiliated literary magazine The Common will be freely available online under the open-access model governing the press, while The Common will continue to use its own resources to produce the publication's print version.

            Read more about it at "Frequently Asked Questions."

            Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography Cover

            | Digital Scholarship | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography |

            | Digital Scholarship |

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              "On the Impact of Gold Open Access Journals"

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on December 5th, 2012

              Christian Gumpenberger, María-Antonia Ovalle-Perandones, and Juan Gorraiz have self-archived "On the Impact of Gold Open Access Journals" in U: Scholar.

              Here's an excerpt:

              This study identified the current set of Gold Open Access journals featuring a Journal Impact Factor (JIF) by means of Ulrichsweb, Directory of Open Access Journals and Journal Citation Reports (JCR). The results were analyzed regarding disciplines, countries, quartiles of the JIF distribution in JCR and publishers. Furthermore the temporal impact evolution was studied for a Top 50 titles list (according to JIF) by means of Journal Impact Factor, SJR and SNIP in the time interval 2000-2010. The identified top Gold Open Access journals proved to be well-established and their impact is generally increasing for all the analyzed indicators. The majority of JCR-indexed OA journals can be assigned to Life Sciences and Medicine. The success-rate for JCR inclusion differs from country to country and is often inversely proportional to the number of national OA journal titles.

              Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography Cover

              | Digital Scholarship | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography |

              | Digital Scholarship |

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                General Cost Analysis for Scholarly Communication in Germany: Results of the "Houghton Report" for Germany

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on December 3rd, 2012

                Goethe University has released General Cost Analysis for Scholarly Communication in Germany: Results of the "Houghton Report" for Germany.

                Here's an excerpt:

                This analysis of the potential benefits of more open access to research findings suggests that different publishing models can make a material difference to the benefits realised, as well as the costs faced. It seems likely that more Open Access would have substantial net benefits in the longer term and, while net benefits may be lower during a transitional period, they are likely to be positive for both 'author-pays' Open Access publishing and the 'over-lay journals' alternatives ('Gold Open Access'), and for parallel subscription publishing and self-archiving ('Green Open Access'). The NLP returns substantial benefits and savings at a modest cost, returning one of the highest benefit/cost ratios available from unilateral national policies during a transitional period (second to that of 'Green Open Access' self-archiving). Whether 'Green Open Access' self-archiving in parallel with subscriptions is a sustainable model over the longer term is debateable, and what impact the NLP may have on the take up of Open Access alternatives is also an important consideration. So too is the potential for developments in Open Access or other scholarly publishing business models to significantly change the relative cost-benefit of the NLP over time.

                Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals Cover

                | Digital Scholarship |

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