Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

Cogent OA Launches Experimental Freedom APCs Program Letting Authors Choose What to Pay

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 3rd, 2015

Cogent OA has launched an experimental Freedom APCs Program.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Through Cogent OA's Freedom APC model, authors are requested to explore all avenues for funding the publication of their article, such as their funding agency, institution or company and to select a fee from a range of options based on their circumstances and how much they can afford to pay. The final decision rests with the author.

Further information: Article Publishing Charges (APCs).

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    Department of Defense Releases Draft Plan to Establish Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research

    Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on March 19th, 2015

    The Department of Defense has released a draft Plan to Establish Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research .

    Here's an excerpt from the SPARC announcement:

    It calls for all DoD-funded researchers to deposit final peer-reviewed manuscripts into the Department's "Defense Technical Information Center" (DTIC) repository. All articles will be made available to the public with no longer than a 12 embargo period. . . .

    The DoD draft plan doesn't elaborate on reuse rights for articles in the DTIC database, other than to note that articles will be subject to copyright and related license terms. Articles authored by DoD employees, however, will carry a full government use license. . . .

    One significant place where the DoD's draft plan differs from others released to date is in the area of compliance. The Department indicates that it plans to develop its own "compliance monitor," that will issue "certification tokens" to authors who submit articles and datasets to the DoD under the new policies. The current document doesn't provide any additional details, but the concept of tokens is an intriguing one.

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      "ADS: The Next Generation Search Platform"

      Posted in Digital Repositories, EPrints, Open Access, Scholarly Journals on March 16th, 2015

      Alberto Accomazzi et al. have self-archived "ADS: The Next Generation Search Platform."

      Here's an excerpt:

      Starting in 2011, the ADS started to systematically collect, parse and index full-text documents for all the major publications in Physics and Astronomy as well as many smaller Astronomy journals and arXiv e-prints, for a total of over 3.5 million papers. Our citation coverage has doubled since 2010 and now consists of over 70 million citations. We are normalizing the affiliation information in our records and, in collaboration with the CfA library and NASA, we have started collecting and linking funding sources with papers in our system. . . . We have rolled out and are now enhancing a new high-performance search engine capable of performing full-text as well as metadata searches using an intuitive query language which supports fielded, unfielded and functional searches. We are currently able to index acknowledgments, affiliations, citations, funding sources, and to the extent that these metadata are available to us they are now searchable under our new platform. The ADS private library system is being enhanced to support reading groups, collaborative editing of lists of papers, tagging, and a variety of privacy settings when managing one's paper collection.

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        "Better Sharing Through Licenses? Measuring the Influence of Creative Commons Licenses on the Usage of Open Access Monographs"

        Posted in Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Scholarly Books on March 11th, 2015

        Ronald Snijder has published "Better Sharing Through Licenses? Measuring the Influence of Creative Commons Licenses on the Usage of Open Access Monographs" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

        Here's an excerpt:

        The application of open licenses to books does not, on its own, lead to more downloads. However, open licenses pave the way for intermediaries to offer new discovery and aggregation services. These services play an important role by amplifying the impacts of open access licensing in the case of scholarly books.

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          "Beyond Beall’s List: Better Understanding Predatory Publishers"

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 10th, 2015

          Monica Berger and Jill Cirasella have published "Beyond Beall's List: Better Understanding Predatory Publishers" in College & Research Libraries News.

          Here's an excerpt:

          Although predatory publishers predate OA, their recent explosion was expedited by the emergence and success of fee-charging OA journals. No matter how strong our urge to support and defend OA, librarians cannot deny the profusion of predators in the OA arena; John Bohannon's recent "sting" made abundantly clear (despite methodological flaws) that there are many bad actors. Rather, we should seek to understand their methods, track their evolution, and communicate their characteristics to our patrons.

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            "The OA Interviews: Alison Mudditt, Director, University of California Press"

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals, University Presses on March 9th, 2015

            Richard Poynder has published "The OA Interviews: Alison Mudditt, Director, University of California Press" in Open and Shut? in which Mudditt discusses the UC Press' Collabra and Luminos open access programs.

            Here's an excerpt:

            Collabra's model speaks to publishers, libraries, funders, and researchers who are seeking more cost transparency and greater recognition of the critical role that the academic and scientific community plays in journal publishing. In our model, the people who do the fundamental work of peer-review are recognized for this and are able to decide where to place that value.

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              "Flipping, not Flopping: Converting Subscription Journals to Open Access"

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 5th, 2015

              Alice Meadows has published "Flipping, not Flopping: Converting Subscription Journals to Open Access" in The Scholarly Kitchen .

              Here's an excerpt:

              The question of whether—and, if so, when and how—to 'flip' a traditional, subscription-based journal to open access (OA) is one that comes up time and again in meetings with our society partners. It's also something that funders sometimes like to suggest as a quick route to a more open world—"Why not just convert all your journals to OA?" they ask.

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                Canadian Tri-Agency Open Access Policy

                Posted in Open Access on March 3rd, 2015

                The Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada have adopted a harmonized open access policy.

                Here's an excerpt from the FAQ:

                The Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications requires that peer-reviewed journal publications resulting from Tri-Agency (NSERC, SSHRC or CIHR) grants be freely accessible online within 12 months of publication.

                Grant recipients may comply with the policy through one of the following routes:

                • Grant recipients archive the final peer-reviewed full-text manuscript in an online repository where it will be freely accessible within 12 months (e.g., institutional repository or discipline-based repository). It is the responsibility of the grant recipient to determine which publishers allow authors to retain copyright and/or allow authors to archive journal publications in accordance with funding agency policies.
                • Grant recipients can publish in a journal that offers open access or that offers open access on its website within 12 months.

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                  "The Economics of Open Access"

                  Posted in Open Access, Publishing on March 3rd, 2015

                  Walt Crawford as published "The Economics of Open Access" in Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  This essay is primarily about open access, but strays into journal publishing in general. As usual, it's a combination of resources (cites) and commentary (insights), divided into ten overlapping segments. I believe the mèlange will be informative and useful, although I'm certain it won't provide pat answers to most questions, because such answers don't exist.

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                    "AHRQ, NASA, USDA Release Plans for Public Access to Funded Research"

                    Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 23rd, 2015

                    ARL has released AHRQ, NASA, USDA Release Plans for Public Access to Funded Research.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    Three US Government agencies-the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA)-recently released their plans for increasing public access to federally funded research in response to the 2013 White House Office of Science & Technology Policy (OSTP) directive. The OSTP memorandum directed federal agencies with R&D budgets of $100 million or more to develop plans to make the published results of federally funded research freely available to the public within one year of publication.

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                      Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Adopts Open Access Mandate

                      Posted in Open Access on February 10th, 2015

                      The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, an agency within the United States Department of Health and Human Services, has adopted an open access mandate.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      For scholarly publications, the AHRQ Public Access Policy will require that authors submit the final peer-reviewed accepted journal manuscripts to PubMed Central (PMC). In lieu of the final peer-reviewed manuscript, AHRQ will accept the final published article, provided the awardee can ensure AHRQ has the rights to make the published version public. AHRQ's Public Access Policy is subject to law; Agency mission; resource constraints; U.S. national, homeland, and economic security; and the objectives listed in the OSTP directive.

                      To the extent feasible and consistent with applicable law and policy; Agency mission; resource constraints; U.S. national, homeland, and economic security; and the objectives listed below, digitally formatted scientific data resulting from unclassified research supported wholly or in part by Federal funding should be stored and publicly accessible to search, retrieve, and analyze. For sharing of data in digital format, all AHRQ-funded researchers will be required to include a data management plan for sharing final research data in digital format, or state why data sharing is not possible.

                      Peter Suber has critiqued the mandate.

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                        "Open Access Article Processing Charges: DOAJ Survey May 2014"

                        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 10th, 2015

                        Heather Morrison et al. have published "Open Access Article Processing Charges: DOAJ Survey May 2014" in Publications.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        As of May 2014, the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) listed close to ten thousand fully open access, peer reviewed, scholarly journals. Most of these journals do not charge article processing charges (APCs). This article reports the results of a survey of the 2567 journals, or 26% of journals listed in DOAJ, that do have APCs based on a sample of 1432 of these journals. Results indicate a volatile sector that would make future APCs difficult to predict for budgeting purposes. DOAJ and publisher title lists often did not closely match. A number of journals were found on examination not to have APCs. A wide range of publication costs was found for every publisher type. The average (mean) APC of $964 contrasts with a mode of $0. At least 61% of publishers using APCs are commercial in nature, while many publishers are of unknown types. The vast majority of journals charging APCs (80%) were found to offer one or more variations on pricing, such as discounts for authors from mid to low income countries, differential pricing based on article type, institutional or society membership, and/or optional charges for extras such as English language editing services or fast track of articles. The complexity and volatility of this publishing landscape is discussed.

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