Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

"Supporting Scholarly Communication: Considerations for Library Leadership"

Posted in Open Access, Scholarly Communication on September 6th, 2016

Irene M. H. Herold has published "Supporting Scholarly Communication: Considerations for Library Leadership" in College & Research Libraries News.

Here's an excerpt:

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Starting from the question of what library leaders can do, I approach the topic of supporting scholarly communication from three perspectives: mentorship, effective partnerships, and the leadership role. I reviewed past columns from a leadership perspective. I also asked some of my "thought leader" colleagues what they saw as important trends and considerations.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"OJS 3 is Here!"

Posted in Open Access, Open Source Software, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 2nd, 2016

The Public Knowledge Project has released "OJS 3 is Here!." OJS stands for Open Journal Systems.

Here's an excerpt:

This is the most comprehensive software upgrade since we moved from OJS 1.0 to 2.0 way back in 2005. It incorporates a decade of feedback from our users on the community forum, through usability testing, and through thousands of conversations, feature requests, and helpful critiques.

As we approach the milestone of having 10,000 journals actively using OJS as their publishing platform, we believe this new release will significantly enhance their productivity and ease of use, and provide a modern foundation for innovation in online publishing.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"FTC Charges Academic Journal Publisher OMICS Group Deceived Researchers"

Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 1st, 2016

The Federal Trade Commission has released "FTC Charges Academic Journal Publisher OMICS Group Deceived Researchers."

Here's an excerpt:

The Federal Trade Commission has charged the publisher of hundreds of purported online academic journals with deceiving academics and researchers about the nature of its publications and hiding publication fees ranging from hundreds to thousands of dollars.

The FTC's complaint alleges that OMICS Group, Inc., along with two affiliated companies and their president and director, Srinubabu Gedela, claim that their journals follow rigorous peer-review practices and have editorial boards made up of prominent academics. In reality, many articles are published with little to no peer review and numerous individuals represented to be editors have not agreed to be affiliated with the journals.

According to the FTC's complaint, OMICS does not tell researchers that they must pay significant publishing fees until after it has accepted an article for publication, and often will not allow researchers to withdraw their articles from submission, thereby making the research ineligible for publication in another journal. Academic ethics standards generally forbid researchers from submitting the same research to more than one journal.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

The Countries of OAWorld 2011-2015: Supplement to Gold Open Access Journals 2011-2015

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 29th, 2016

Walt Crawford has published The Countries of OAWorld 2011-2015: Supplement to Gold Open Access Journals 2011-2015.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

This supplement to Gold Open Access Journals 2011-2015 looks at each country with journals fully analyzed in the report. Countries with ten or more journals (some 70 of them) get full writeups; others are summarized by region.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Substituting Article Processing Charges for Subscriptions: The Cure Is Worse than the Disease"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 25th, 2016

ARL has released "Substituting Article Processing Charges for Subscriptions: The Cure Is Worse than the Disease by David Shulenburger."

Here's an excerpt:

The likely result of flipping the market to APCs is that the collective cost of scholarly communications would rise above the level that would prevail under the subscription-financed regime.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Just as Open Competitor to Elsevier’s SSRN Launches, SSRN Accused of Copyright Crackdown"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Publishing on July 21st, 2016

Mike Masnick has published "Just as Open Competitor to Elsevier's SSRN Launches, SSRN Accused of Copyright Crackdown" in Techdirt.

Here's an excerpt:

And perhaps this [SocArXiv announcement]came just in time, because just as that happened, Stephen Henderson, a law professor, noted that SSRN took down his paper saying that they didn't think he retained the copyright to it.

See also: "SocArXiv Debuts, as SSRN acquisition Comes Under Scrutiny."

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Write up! A Study of Copyright Information on Library-Published Journals"

Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on July 20th, 2016

Melanie Schlosser has published "Write up! A Study of Copyright Information on Library-Published Journals" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

INTRODUCTION Libraries have a mission to educate users about copyright, and library publishing staff are often involved in that work. This article investigates a concrete point of intersection between the two areas—copyright statements on library-published journals. METHODS Journals published by members of the Library Publishing Coalition were examined for open access status, type and placement of copyright information, copyright ownership, and open licensing. RESULTS Journals in the sample were overwhelmingly (93%) open access. 80% presented copyright information of some kind, but only 30% of those included it at both the journal and the article level. Open licensing was present in 38% of the journals, and the most common ownership scenario was the author retaining copyright while granting a nonexclusive license to the journal or publisher. 9% of the sample journals included two or more conflicting rights statements. DISCUSSION 76% of the journals did not consistently provide accurate, easily-accessible rights information, and numerous problems were found with the use of open licensing, including conflicting licenses, incomplete licenses, and licenses not appearing at the article level. CONCLUSION Recommendations include presenting full copyright and licensing information at both the journal and the article level, careful use of open licenses, and publicly-available author agreements. External Data or Supplements:

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Deconstructing the Durham Statement: The Persistence of Print Prestige During the Age of Open Access"

Posted in Libraries, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 15th, 2016

Sarah Reis has self-archived "Deconstructing the Durham Statement: The Persistence of Print Prestige During the Age of Open Access."

Here's an excerpt:

In the seven years following the promulgation of the Durham Statement on Open Access to Legal Scholarship, law journals have largely responded to the call to make articles available in open, electronic formats, but not to the call to stop print publication and publish only in electronic format. Nearly all of the flagship law reviews at ABA-accredited institutions still insist on publishing in print, despite the massive decline in print subscribers and economic and environmental waste. . . . The Durham Statement was drafted by law library directors from top law schools across the country. Law librarians today must assist in facilitating the transition if we ever expect to see a world of electronic-only publication of law journals. This paper argues that the Harvard Law Review, Yale Law Journal, and Stanford Law Review must be the first law reviews to transition to electronic-only publication, after which other law journals will follow suit.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Open Access Archivangelist: The Last Interview?"

Posted in Open Access, People in the News, Self-Archiving on July 14th, 2016

Otwartanauka.pl has released "Open Access Archivangelist: The Last Interview?."

Here's an excerpt:

It seems, however, that the long era of [Stevan] Harnad's 'Archivangelism' for Open Access is coming to an end. Earlier this year, 22 years after the 'Subversive Proposal', Harnad made it quite clear via Twitter that he is about to quit Open Access Advocacy.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"ACRL Issues Policy Statement on Open Access to Scholarship by Academic Librarians"

Posted in Open Access, Research Libraries, Self-Archiving on July 13th, 2016

Kara Malenfant has published "ACRL Issues Policy Statement on Open Access to Scholarship by Academic Librarians" in ACRL Insider.

Here's an excerpt:

In support of broad and timely dissemination of library and information science scholarship, the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) encourages academic librarians to publish in open access journals. When academic librarians choose to publish in subscription-based journals, ACRL recommends a standard practice of depositing the final accepted manuscript in a repository to make that version openly accessible.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"A Two-Sided Academic Landscape: Portrait of Highly-Cited Documents in Google Scholar (1950-2013)"

Posted in Google and Other Search Engines, Open Access, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Metrics on July 13th, 2016

Alberto Martin-Martin et al. have self-archived "A Two-Sided Academic Landscape: Portrait of Highly-Cited Documents in Google Scholar (1950-2013)."

Here's an excerpt:

Since the existence of a full-text link does not guarantee the disposal of the full-text (some links actually refer to publisher's abstracts), the results (40% of the documents had a free full-text link) might be somewhat overestimated. In any case, these values are consistent with those published by Archambault et al. (2013), who found that over 40% of the articles from their sample were freely accessible; higher than those by Khabsa and Giles (2014) and Björk et al. (2010), who found only a 24% and 20.4% of open access documents respectively; and much lower than Jamali and Nabavi (2015) and Pitol and De Groote (2014), who found 61.1% and 70% respectively.

The different nature of the samples makes it difficult to draw comparisons among these studies. Nonetheless, the sample used in this study (64,000 documents) is the largest ever used to date.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Developing SocArXiv—A New Open Archive of the Social Sciences to Challenge the Outdated Journal System"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Self-Archiving on July 12th, 2016

Philip Cohen has published "Developing SocArXiv—A New Open Archive of the Social Sciences to Challenge the Outdated Journal System" in LSE Impact.

Here's an excerpt:

But there remains a need for a new general, open-access, open-source, paper server for the social sciences, one that encourages linking and sharing data and code, that serves its research to an open metadata system, and that provides the foundation for a post-publication review system. I hope that SocArXiv will enable us to save research from the journal system. Once it's built, anyone will be able to use it to organize their own peer-review community, to select and publish papers (though not exclusively), to review and comment on each other's work – and to discover, cite, value, and share research unimpeded. We will be able to do this because of a partnership with the Center for Open Science (which is already developing a new preprint server) and SHARE ("a free, open, data set about research and scholarly activities across their life cycle"). We are also supported by the University of Maryland, which hosts the initiative.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap


Page 3 of 11112345...102030...Last »

DigitalKoans

DigitalKoans

Digital Scholarship

Copyright © 2005-2016 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license.