Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

"Putting Open Science into Practice: A Social Dilemma?"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science on September 10th, 2014

Kaja Scheliga and Sascha Friesike have published "Putting Open Science into Practice: A Social Dilemma?" in First Monday.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

Digital technologies carry the promise of transforming science and opening up the research process. We interviewed researchers from a variety of backgrounds about their attitudes towards and experiences with openness in their research practices. We observe a considerable discrepancy between the concept of open science and scholarly reality. While many researchers support open science in theory, the individual researcher is confronted with various difficulties when putting open science into practice. We analyse the major obstacles to open science and group them into two main categories: individual obstacles and systemic obstacles. We argue that the phenomenon of open science can be seen through the prism of a social dilemma: what is in the collective best interest of the scientific community is not necessarily in the best interest of the individual scientist. We discuss the possibilities of transferring theoretical solutions to social dilemma problems to the realm of open science.

Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

Be Sociable, Share!

    Open Access Advocate Robin Peek Retires

    Posted in Open Access, People in the News on September 4th, 2014

    Noted open access advocate Robin Peek has retired from the Simmons GSLIS.

    Here's an excerpt from the press release:

    "Robin Peek was one of the earliest advocates for open access to research, one of the first to write about it regularly, and one of the first to teach a course about it, which she taught at Simmons." said Dr. Peter Suber, Director of the Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication, the Harvard Open Access Project and co-founder of the Open Access Directory. "She is also the editor and co-founder of the Open Access Directory, a globally recognized encyclopedia of open access hosted by Simmons. The Open Access Directory is unique in that it is hosted and preserved by a library school, open to public contributions, edited for quality, and featured on every major list of essential resources on the topic." The six-year old Open Access Directory, a wiki managed by the OA community that provides reference lists about open access to scientists and scholars and has had more than four million views. Peek will continue to be the editor of the Open Access Directory.

    Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

    Be Sociable, Share!

      "The Big Picture: Scholarly Publishing Trends 2014"

      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 26th, 2014

      Pippa Smart has published "The Big Picture: Scholarly Publishing Trends 2014" in Science Editing.

      Here's an excerpt:

      Technical solutions have attempted to address the growth in research but have sometimes added to the tsunami of information and increased the need to manage quality. To this end experiments with the traditional quality control and dissemination systems have been attempted, but news of improvements are frequently overshadowed by alarms about ethical problems. There is particular concern about some of the new publishers who are not adhering to established quality control and ethical practices. Within a potentially fragmenting system, however, there are also emerging collaborative projects helping to knit together the different elements of the publishing landscape to improve quality, linkages and access.

      Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

      Be Sociable, Share!

        "STM’s New Publishing Licenses Raise Antitrust Concerns Amid Wider Efforts to Pollute Open Access Standards"

        Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing on August 25th, 2014

        Ariel Katz has published "STM's New Publishing Licenses Raise Antitrust Concerns Amid Wider Efforts to Pollute Open Access Standards" in LSE Impact of Social Sciences.

        Here's an excerpt:

        For antitrust purposes, when a group of publishers adopts a set of uniform licenses, or when it recommends that its members adopt them, they tread in the area of antitrust law's core concern: "price fixing". In antitrust lingo the term price fixing is not limited to coordinating on price, but applies to any coordination that affects the quantity, quality, or any other feature of the product. Indeed, "[t]erms of use are no less a part of 'the product,'"[1] and competition between publishers is supposed to ensure optimal license terms just as it is expected to guarantee competitive prices. Therefore, when a group of publishers coordinates license terms, their concerted action is not conceptually different for antitrust purposes from a decision to coordinate subscription fees (downstream) or submission fees (upstream), and when the group represents the leading publishers and affects the majority of publications, antitrust concerns are further heightened.

        Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

        Be Sociable, Share!

          U.S. Department of Energy Public Access Plan

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on August 21st, 2014

          U.S. Department of Energy has released its Public Access Plan.

          Here's an excerpt:

          The Department proposes to host, a portal and a search interface tool, the Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science (PAGES), to enhance the discoverability of unclassified and otherwise unrestricted scholarly publications resulting from DOE funding. PAGES will provide metadata and abstracts for such publications in a way that is open, readable, and available for bulk download. The PAGES metadata catalog will be included in the Department's Enterprise Data Inventory and Public Data Listing. PAGES will also link to the full text VoR hosted by the publisher when the article is available on the publisher's site openly and without charge. In instances where this is not the case, PAGES will link to a full-text version of the accepted manuscript twelve months from the article publication date and then link to the VoR when and if it becomes available. Metadata accompanying the accepted manuscript, e.g., author name, journal title, and digital object identifier (DOI) for the VoR, ensures that attribution to authors, journals, and original publishers will be maintained.

          Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

          Be Sociable, Share!

            "The Development of Open Access Repositories in the Asia-Oceania Region: A Case Study of Three Institutions"

            Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on August 19th, 2014

            IFLA has released "The Development of Open Access Repositories in the Asia-Oceania Region: A Case Study of Three Institutions."

            Here's an excerpt:

            In recent years, open access models of publishing have transcended traditional modes thus enabling freer access to research. This paper takes a trans-regional approach to examining open access publishing in the Asia and Oceania region focusing on three institutions—Charles Darwin University in Australia, University of Hong Kong, and University of Malaya in Malaysia—reflecting on how each is rising, in its own individual way, to meet the range of challenges that its research communities are facing. Specifically, it focuses on open access and institutional repository development, and traces their development at each of the aforementioned institutions.

            Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

            Be Sociable, Share!

              "A Current Snapshot of Institutional Repositories: Growth Rate, Disciplinary Content and Faculty Contributions"

              Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on August 18th, 2014

              Ellen Dubinsky has published "A Current Snapshot of Institutional Repositories: Growth Rate, Disciplinary Content and Faculty Contributions" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

              Here's an excerpt:

              Mean and median growth rates of IRs have increased since measured in 2007, with variance depending upon size and type of academic institution and age of the IR. Disciplinary content in IRs is unevenly distributed, with the Sciences predominantly represented. IR administrators remain actively involved in the submission process and in the promotion of their IRs. Personal contact with individuals or groups of faculty is the most used and successful interaction method.

              Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

              Be Sociable, Share!

                "Degrees of Openness: Access Restrictions in Institutional Repositories"

                Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on July 16th, 2014

                Hélène Prostand Joachim Schöpfel have published "Degrees of Openness: Access Restrictions in Institutional Repositories" in D-Lib Magazine.

                Here's an excerpt:

                Institutional repositories, green road and backbone of the open access movement, contain a growing number of items that are metadata without full text, metadata with full text only for authorized users, and items that are under embargo or that are restricted to on-campus access. This paper provides a short overview of relevant literature and presents empirical results from a survey of 25 institutional repositories that contain more than 2 million items. The intention is to evaluate their degree of openness with specific attention to different categories of documents (journal articles, books and book chapters, conference communications, electronic theses and dissertations, reports, working papers) and thus to contribute to a better understanding of their features and dynamics. We address the underlying question of whether this lack of openness is temporary due to the transition from traditional scientific communication to open access infrastructures and services, or here to stay, as a basic feature of the new and complex cohabitation of institutional repositories and commercial publishing.

                Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

                Be Sociable, Share!

                  Page 3 of 14012345...102030...Last »

                  DigitalKoans

                  DigitalKoans

                  Digital Scholarship

                  Copyright © 2005-2014 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

                  Creative Commons License

                  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.