Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

World Bank Adopts Open Access Policy Putting Works Under Creative Commons Attribution License

Posted in Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access on April 10th, 2012

The World Bank has adopted an Open Access Policy that puts its works under a CC BY 3.0 License.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

Two years after opening its vast storehouse of data to the public, the World Bank is consolidating more than 2,000 books, articles, reports and research papers in a search-engine friendly Open Knowledge Repository, and allowing the public to distribute, reuse and build upon much of its work—including commercially. . . .

The repository and Creative Commons licenses are part of a new open access policy that takes effect on July 1 and will be phased in over the next year.

Read more about it at "World Bank to Introduce Open Access Policy."

| Works about Open Access by Charles W. Bailey, Jr. | Digital Scholarship |

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    The Power of Open

    Posted in Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access on April 9th, 2012

    The Creative Commons has released The Power of Open.

    Here's an excerpt:

    Creative Commons began providing licenses for the open sharing of content only a decade ago. Now more than 400 million CC-licensed works are available on the Internet, from music and photos, to research findings and entire college courses. Creative Commons created the legal and technical infrastructure that allows effective sharing of knowledge, art and data by individuals, organizations and governments. More importantly, millions of creators took advantage of that infrastructure to share work that enriches the global commons for all humanity.

    The Power of Open collects the stories of those creators. Some are like ProPublica, a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative news organization that uses CC while partnering with the world’s largest media companies. Others like nomadic filmmaker Vincent Moon use CC licensing as an essential element of a lifestyle of openness in pursuit of creativity. The breadth of uses is as great as the creativity of the individuals and organizations choosing to open their content, art and ideas to the rest of the world.

    Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: "This bibliography is recommended for everyone interested in open access publishing." — M. Blobaum, Journal of the Medical Library Association 100, no. 1 (2012): 73.

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      "Do Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences and Humanities?"

      Posted in Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs), Institutional Repositories, Open Access on April 8th, 2012

      College & Research Libraries has released an preprint of "Do Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences and Humanities?"

      Here's an excerpt:

      An increasing number of higher education institutions worldwide are requiring submission of electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) by graduate students and are subsequently providing open access to these works in online repositories. Faculty advisors and graduate students are concerned that such unfiltered access to their work could diminish future publishing opportunities. This study investigated social sciences, arts and humanities journal editors' and university press directors' attitudes toward ETDs. The findings indicate that manuscripts which are revisions of openly accessible ETDs are always welcome for submission or considered on a case by case basis by 82.8% of journal editors and 53.7% of university press directors polled.

      | Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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        Policy Guidelines for the Development and Promotion of Open Access

        Posted in Open Access, Reports and White Papers on April 8th, 2012

        UNESCO has released Policy Guidelines for the Development and Promotion of Open Access by Alma Swan.

        Here's an excerpt:

        The Policy Guidelines can be used by individuals as a basic text on Open Access and related policies. While we recommend that beginners to the world of Open Access should read it from cover to cover, people having some understanding of OA may like to start reading from any of the sections. Decision-makers, administrators and research managers should focus on Sections 8 and 9 that capture all relevant issues of OA policy development. At the end of this document, you will find examples of different types of OA policies (Appendix 1), and three policy templates (Appendix 2) to choose and adopt.

        | Works about Open Access by Charles W. Bailey, Jr. | Digital Scholarship |

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          "An Open Access Policy for the University of California: Materials for Discussion and Consultation"

          Posted in Open Access on April 3rd, 2012

          The University of California's University Committee on the Library and Scholarly Communication has released "An Open Access Policy for the University of California: Materials for Discussion and Consultation."

          Here's an excerpt:

          This document is intended to spur discussion about a university-wide open access policy at the University of California. The Faculty of the University of California (coordinated by the University Committee on Libraries and Scholarly Communication) has created a model version of this policy, included here, along with many frequently asked questions about the issue. This is not an official proposed policy, but a document for discussion and debate. UCOLASC hope to make UC faculty broadly aware of the issues, and to help answer questions about it before the official policy is drafted and circulated in the spring of this year (2012).

          Read more about it at "UC Open Access Policy to Be Debated."

          | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: "This work gives an outstanding overview of scholarship relating to the growing Open Access movement." — George Machovec, The Charleston Advisor 12, no. 2 (2010): 3. | Digital Scholarship |

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            "The Dutch Research Repositories Monitor 2011" (Report Synopsis)

            Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Reports and White Papers on April 2nd, 2012

            SURF has released an English synopsis of The Dutch Research Repositories Monitor 2011.

            Here's an excerpt:

            This study measures the effects of the two networks of repositories [DARE programme and SURFshare programme], charts the current situation, and explores possible scenarios for the future. It is in part a follow-up to the study Dutch Academic Repositories SURFshare Baseline Survey [Nederlandse Academische Repositories, SURFshare Nulmeting] of March 2010. That study was a baseline survey of the Dutch universities’ repositories carried out at the end of 2008 and with additional research in the first half of 2009. Important statistics in the study concern the 2007 calendar year. In other words, despite being published in 2010, the results were in fact a number of years old, namely from the start of the SURFshare programme.

            Read more about it at "Open Access to Dutch Research Stagnating."

            | Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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              "FPRAA Takes Center Stage at Congressional Hearing"

              Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing on April 1st, 2012

              In "FPRAA Takes Center Stage at Congressional Hearing, Andrea Higginbotham summarizes the House Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight’s recent hearing on Federally Funded Research: Examining Public Access and Scholarly Publication Interests.

              The hearing also featured testimonies from two members of scholarly societies—Fred Dylla (the American Institute of Physics), and Crispin Taylor (the American Society of Plant Biologists) who expressed concerns with various components of FRPAA. They argued that the current system is working well, and worried that their societies—which are currently funded almost entirely from revenue from subscription based publications—would see a significant decrease in revenue if FRPAA were to be enacted. . . .

              Dr. Stuart Shieber, Director of the Office for Scholarly Communication at Harvard University, argued that open access to research is an intrinsic public good. He quoted Thomas Jefferson, noting "the most important bill in our whole code is that for the diffusion of knowledge among the people."

              Shieber suggested that traditional publishing market is a dysfunctional one—library budgets for serials continue to shrink while journal profit margins increase. He spoke to the growing body of research demonstrating the economic growth occurs from increased innovations from openly accessible research. He discussed several forward-thinking open access publishing models, and focused on the need for policies that facilitate full utility of digital information in order to enable scholarship and research.

              Read more about it at the previous DigitalKoans post, "House Hearing on Federally Funded Research: Examining Public Access and Scholarly Publication Interests" (lists testimony and other documents from the hearing).

              Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: "This bibliography is recommended for everyone interested in open access publishing." — M. Blobaum, Journal of the Medical Library Association 100, no. 1 (2012): 73.

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                House Hearing on Federally Funded Research: Examining Public Access and Scholarly Publication Interests

                Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on March 29th, 2012

                The House Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight held a hearing today on Federally Funded Research: Examining Public Access and Scholarly Publication Interests.

                Here are the documents that have been released for this hearing:

                | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: "This work gives an outstanding overview of scholarship relating to the growing Open Access movement." — George Machovec, The Charleston Advisor 12, no. 2 (2010): 3. | Digital Scholarship |

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                  "Will An Institutional Repository Hurt My SSRN Ranking? Calming the Faculty Fear"

                  Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on March 28th, 2012

                  James M. Donovan and Carol A. Watson have published "Will An Institutional Repository Hurt My SSRN Ranking? Calming the Faculty Fear" in the latest issue of AALL Spectrum.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  Plans for a new IR project within the law school, however, can quickly find such worthy motives swept aside as faculty members invariably voice some version of the following comments: "Won't posting my articles elsewhere steal downloads away from SSRN? That would lower my rankings in SSRN and perhaps reduce my professional stature."

                  One can regret that law academics today reflexively cower at the thought of appearing to perform poorly on any new ranking system that crosses their path, no matter how dubious. Even so, there can be no denying that SSRN, or the Social Science Research Network, has earned a respectable cachet among the professoriate.

                  | Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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                    Federal Research Public Access Act Gains 24 New Co-sponsors

                    Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access on March 20th, 2012

                    The Federal Research Public Access Act has gained 24 new bipartisan co-sponsors.

                    Here's an excerpt from the press release:

                    The new co-sponsors. . . join the bill's original sponsors, Rep. Mike Doyle (D-PA), Rep. Lacy Clay (D-MO) and Rep. Kevin Yoder (R-KS). These new supporters reflect the consistently broad and bi-partisan appeal of this policy, which would ensure that taxpayers are guaranteed free, online access to articles reporting on the results research that their tax dollars have funded.

                    This issue was explored in depth at a briefing on Capitol Hill yesterday, hosted by the office of Rep. Mike Doyle. The briefing featured two expert speakers. First, Dr. Neil Thakur, Special Assistant to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Deputy Director for Extramural Research and Program Manager for the NIH Public Access Policy, presented a thorough view of that agency's experience with their landmark Public Access policy. He noted that the NIH considers public access as central to their mission, and as a critical component in ensuring that the public's investment in NIH-funded research is leveraged to its fullest.

                    He was followed by Elliot Maxwell, Program Director of the Digital Connections Council of the Committee for Economic Development and author of the recent Kaufman Foundation for Entrepreneurship-funded report, "The Future of Taxpayer-Funded Research: Who Will Control Access to the Results?" Maxwell presented a synopsis of the report focusing on the potential impacts of expanding the NIH Policy to other U.S. Federal science agencies. He explored the potential benefits this expansion might have on scientific productivity, economic growth, innovation and national competitiveness.

                    | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography| Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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                      "The Effects of Open Access Mandates on Institutional Repositories in the UK and Germany"

                      Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on March 19th, 2012

                      Sabine Elisabeth Puskas has self-archived her Master's dissertation, "The Effects of Open Access Mandates on Institutional Repositories in the UK and Germany," in the Loughborough University Institutional Repository.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      There is evidence that institutional mandates do have effects on institutional repositories in different ways, e.g. on content deposited and service provision. The effects vary according to the characteristics of repositories and the approach taken by institutions. The research results also indicate that the experiences of institutions with a mandate and the expectations of institutions without one are almost identical across both the UK and Germany, although the developmental context of institutional repositories and institutional mandates in these two countries are very different.

                      | Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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                        "Wait for It. . . Commons, Copyright and the Private (Re)Ordering of Scientific Publishing"

                        Posted in Copyright, Open Access, Publishing on March 19th, 2012

                        Jorge L. Contreras has self-archived "Wait for It. . . Commons, Copyright and the Private (Re)Ordering of Scientific Publishing" in SSRN.

                        In this paper, Contreras critiques various open access strategies, and he proposes that publishers be granted one-year exclusive licenses as an alternative to these strategies.

                        | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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