Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

The Open Data Handbook

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access on February 22nd, 2012

The Open Knowledge Foundation has released The Open Data Handbook.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

From a basic introduction of the "what and why" of open data, the Handbook goes on to discuss the practicalities of making data open – the "how". It gives advice on everything from choosing a file format and applying a license, to motivating the community and telling the world. Clear explanations, illustrative examples and technical recommendations make the Handbook suitable for people with all levels of experience, from the absolute beginner to the seasoned open data professional.

The Handbook is divided into short chapters which cover individual aspects of open data. It can be read in a single sitting, or dipped into as a reference work.

| Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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    "A Study of Open Access Journals Using Article Processing Charges"

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 15th, 2012

    David J. Solomon and Bo-Christer Björk have self-archived "A Study of Open Access Journals Using Article Processing Charges".

    Here's an excerpt:

    Article Processing Charges (APCs) are a central mechanism for funding Open Access (OA) scholarly publishing. We studied the APCs charged and article volumes of journals that were listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals as charging APCs. These included 1,370 journals that published 100,697 articles in 2010. The average APC was 906 US Dollars (USD) calculated over journals and 904 US Dollars USD calculated over articles. The price range varied between 8 and 3,900 USD, with the lowest prices charged by journals published in developing countries and the highest by journals with high impact factors from major international publishers. Journals in Biomedicine represent 59% of the sample and 58% of the total article volume. They also had the highest APCs of any discipline. Professionally published journals, both for profit and nonprofit had substantially higher APCs than society, university or scholar/researcher published journals. These price estimates are lower than some previous studies of OA publishing and much lower than is generally charged by subscription publishers making individual articles open access in what are termed hybrid journals.

    | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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      "How the Scientific Community Reacts to Newly Submitted Preprints: Article Downloads, Twitter Mentions, and Citations"

      Posted in Open Access, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Metrics, Self-Archiving on February 14th, 2012

      Xin Shuai, Alberto Pepe, Johan Bollen have self-archived "How the Scientific Community Reacts to Newly Submitted Preprints: Article Downloads, Twitter Mentions, and Citations" in arXiv.org.

      Here's an excerpt:

      We analyze the online response of the scientific community to the preprint publication of scholarly articles. We employ a cohort of 4,606 scientific articles submitted to the preprint database arXiv.org between October 2010 and April 2011. We study three forms of reactions to these preprints: how they are downloaded on the arXiv.org site, how they are mentioned on the social media site Twitter, and how they are cited in the scholarly record. We perform two analyses. First, we analyze the delay and time span of article downloads and Twitter mentions following submission, to understand the temporal configuration of these reactions and whether significant differences exist between them. Second, we run correlation tests to investigate the relationship between Twitter mentions and both article downloads and article citations. We find that Twitter mentions follow rapidly after article submission and that they are correlated with later article downloads and later article citations, indicating that social media may be an important factor in determining the scientific impact of an article.

      | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography| Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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        The Future of Taxpayer-Funded Research: Who Will Control Access to the Results?

        Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Reports and White Papers on February 13th, 2012

        The Committee for Economic Development has released The Future of Taxpayer-Funded Research: Who Will Control Access to the Results?.

        Here's an excerpt:

        This report builds upon that earlier work and delves deeper into the relationship between the traditional means of providing access to federally funded scientific research and the benefits that can be derived from providing greater public access to it. As with virtually any public policy, the benefits and costs of providing public access to federally funded research fall unevenly on different members of society. We find, however, that because public-access policies that make research more open result in accelerated progress in science and faster economic growth, the net societal benefits far outweigh their limited costs.

        | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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          Call to Action: Support the Federal Research Public Access Act (H.R. 4004 and S. 2096)

          Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access on February 12th, 2012

          The Alliance for Taxpayer Access, whose numerous members include the American Library Association and the Association of College & Research Libraries, has issued a call to action for support of the Federal Research Public Access Act (H.R. 4004 and S. 2096).

          Here's an excerpt:

          Today (February 9, 2012), Senators Cornyn (R-TX), Wyden (D-OR), and Hutchison (R-TX) and Representatives Doyle (D-PA), Yoder (R-KS), and Clay (D-MO) introduced the Federal Research Public Access Act, a bill that would ensure free, timely, online access to the published results of research funded by eleven U.S. federal agencies.

          We currently have a unique opportunity to create change. The Research Works Act, a piece of legislation introduced in December that would ban the government from providing the public access to publicly funded research, has galvanized the research community into acting against practices that restrict access to research articles—reaching the pages of the Economist, the New York Times, Wired, the Guardian, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and many other outlets. . . .

          Let Congress know you support FRPAA

          With reinvigorated support from the research community and attention from the mainstream media, now is the time to push for this groundbreaking legislation and let Congress know that students—and the rest of the public—deserve access to the research which they paid for and upon which their education depends. . . .

          Raise awareness of and build support for FRPAA

          • Sign the ATA Petition in support of FRPAA. Click here to view signatories of the petition. . . .
          • Tweet at or post of the Facebook wall of your legislators to ask them to support and co-sponsor FRPAA; or, if they're already a sponsor, thank them for their leadership. . . .

          Background. . . .

          Now before both the House of Representatives and the Senate, FRPAA would require those agencies with annual extramural research budgets of $100 million or more to provide the public with online access to research manuscripts stemming from such funding no later than six months after publication in a peer-reviewed journal. The bill gives individual agencies flexibility in choosing the location of the digital repository to house this content, as long as the repositories meet conditions for interoperability and public accessibility, and have provisions for long-term archiving.

          The bill specifically covers unclassified research funded by agencies including: Department of Agriculture, Department of Commerce, Department of Defense, Department of Education, Department of Energy, Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Homeland Security, Department of Transportation, Environmental Protection Agency, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the National Science Foundation.

          Further information: "SPARC FAQ for University Administrators and Faculty FRPAA 2012" and "Support FRPAA Banners."

          | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography| Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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            Open Access: Federal Research Public Access Act of 2012

            Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access on February 9th, 2012

            Representative Mike Doyle (D-PA) and others have introduced the Federal Research Public Access Act of 2012 in the House. The bill has also been introduced in the Senate.

            Here's an excerpt from the press release:

            The Federal Research Public Access Act would require federal agencies with an extramural research budget of $100 million or more to make federally-funded research available for free online access by the general public, no later than six months after publication in a peer-reviewed journal.

            The Federal Research Public Access Act would:

            • Require federal departments and agencies with an annual extramural research budget of $100 million or more, whether funded totally or partially by a government department or agency, to submit an electronic copy of the final manuscript that has been accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.
            • Ensure that the manuscript is preserved in a stable digital repository maintained by that agency or in another suitable repository that permits free public access, interoperability, and long-term preservation.
            • Require that each taxpayer-funded manuscript be made available to the public online and without cost, no later than six months after the article has been published in a peer-reviewed journal.

            | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography| Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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              "OA by the Numbers"

              Posted in Open Access on February 8th, 2012

              The Open Access Directory has released "OA by the Numbers."

              Here's an excerpt:

              OA journals (Gold OA)

              • 7,311. November 28, 2011. The number of peer-reviewed OA journals listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ).
              • 1,728. November 28, 2011. The number of CC-licensed journals in the DOAJ.
              • 830. November 28, 2011. The number of SPARC Europe seal journals in the DOAJ. (The SPARC Europe seal requires a CC-BY license.)
              • 4.4. November 28, 2011. Average number of new journals added each day in 2010 to the DOAJ. . . .

              OA repositories (Green OA)

              • 2,145. November 28, 2011. Number of OA, OAI-compliant repositories listed by OpenDOAR (Directory of Open Access Repositories).
              • 2,584. November 28, 2011. Number of OA, OAI-compliant repositories listed by ROAR (Registry of Open Access Repositories).
              • 3,946. November 28, 2011. Number of OA, OAI-compliant repositories listed by OpenArchive.edu

              | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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                Collaborative Yet Independent: Information Practices in the Physical Sciences

                Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Communication on February 8th, 2012

                The Research Information Network, the Institute of Physics, Institute of Physics Publishing, and the Royal Astronomical Society have released Collaborative Yet Independent: Information Practices in the Physical Sciences.

                Here's an excerpt:

                In many ways, the physical sciences are at the forefront of using digital tools and methods to work with information and data. However, the fields and disciplines that make up the physical sciences are by no means uniform, and physical scientists find, use, and disseminate information in a variety of ways. This report examines information practices in the physical sciences across seven cases, and demonstrates the richly varied ways in which physical scientists work, collaborate, and share information and data.

                | Digital Bibliographies | Digital Scholarship |

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                  California Digital Library and Public Knowledge Project Form Partnership to Advance Open Access Publishing

                  Posted in Open Access, Open Source Software, Publishing on February 7th, 2012

                  The California Digital Library and the Public Knowledge Project have formed a partnership to advance open access publishing through the development of open source publishing tools.

                  Here's an excerpt from the press release:

                  As a result of this agreement, the CDL will assist with PKP’s ongoing development and support of its open source software suite&,dash;Open Journal Systems (OJS), Open Conference Systems (OCS), and Open Harvester System (OHS), with Open Monograph Press (OMP) due for release in the coming year.

                  The California Digital Library, in partnership with the University of California campus libraries, supports and encourages open access publishing initiatives within the UC system through its eScholarship publishing and institutional repository platform. eScholarship provides a suite of open access, scholarly publishing services and research tools that enable departments, research units, publishing programs, and individual scholars associated with the University of California to have direct control over the creation and dissemination of the full range of their scholarship. Home to 45 peer-reviewed journals (http://escholarship.org/uc/search?smode=browse;browse-journal=aa), eScholarship has recently transitioned to OJS as its journal management and submission system and has integrated OJS with its pre/post-print, books and working papers repository, which contains more than 45,000 UC-affiliated publications. . . .

                  PKP is dedicated to improving the scholarly and public quality of research. With more than 11,500 installations of Open Journal Systems (OJS); Open Conference Systems (OCS); and Open Harvester Systems (OHS) around the world, the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) has proven that open source software can be a game changer in scholarly publishing.

                  | Digital Scholarship's Digital/Print Books | Digital Scholarship |

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                    "The Influence of the National Institutes of Health Public-Access Policy on the Publishing Habits of Principal Investigators"

                    Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Self-Archiving on February 6th, 2012

                    Nancy Pontika has released her doctoral dissertation, "The Influence of the National Institutes of Health Public-Access Policy on the Publishing Habits of Principal Investigators."

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    The NIH public-access policy did not cause either an increase in the PIs' open-access awareness or a change in their publishing habits. The open-access advocates were supporters of the immediate free access to scientific information before the policy and provided their manuscripts free-of-cost before the policy’s mandate. The non-open-access advocates choose their publications based on quality criteria such as the journal’s prestige, impact factor, speed of publication and the attracted audience, while the article’s open-access availability is considered to be a plus. Furthermore, since a large number of journals comply with the NIH-policy, the participants did not have to change their publishing habits.

                    | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography| Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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                      Access to Scholarly Content: Gaps and Barriers

                      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on February 5th, 2012

                      The Research Information Network has released Access to Scholarly Content: Gaps and Barriers.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      The overall aim of this study is to investigate and quantify the extent to which members of different communities in the UK can gain ready access to formally-published scholarly literature, in particular journal articles and conference proceedings. . . .

                      Much of the information presented here is based on an online survey of researchers and knowledge workers from UK universities and colleges, medical schools and health providers, industry and commerce, and research institutes. . . .

                      Other information in this report comes from a detailed analysis of the literature and secondary data analysis of the Labour Force Survey in an attempt to quantify the size of the UK professional knowledge worker sector.

                      | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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                        Open Access: White House OSTP Releases Public Comments to the RFI on Public Access to Peer-Reviewed Scholarly Publications Resulting from Federally Funded Research

                        Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Self-Archiving on February 1st, 2012

                        The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy has released public comments to the "Request for Information: Public Access to Peer-Reviewed Scholarly Publications Resulting from Federally Funded Research."

                        Here is a selection of comments:

                        Publishers

                        Scholarly Professional Associations

                        | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography| Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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