Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

First Issue of the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication Published

Posted in E-Journals, Open Access, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on May 16th, 2012

The Pacific University Library has published the first issue of the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication, which is an open access journal under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Here's an excerpt from the What is in a Name? Introducing the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication:

The Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication (JLSC) was founded to both recognize and embody this increasingly prominent role of libraries in shaping the future of scholarly communication. Recognize, in that we believe that scholarly communication librarianship has become a core service area for academic libraries, and is deserving of an intellectual home. The increase in seminars, articles and dedicated conferences—like the notable IMLS-funded Library Publishing Services: Strategies for Success10 project—all demonstrate the growing interest in library scholarly communication initiatives, and the need for a dedicated venue for exchange. Embody, in that this is a journal published by an academic library, with an editorial board of library scholar-practitioners, devoted to open, free and flexible communication of knowledge in our field. And in the interest of keeping the channels of communication as open as possible, we also recognize that there are other stakeholders, such as publishers, technologists, and research funders, who play an integral role in determining the future of scholarly communication. Our profession is best served by engaging in honest dialogue with them, and we hope that the work we publish will reflect these types of discussions and collaborations.

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography| Digital Scholarship |

Be Sociable, Share!

    Open Access Bibliography Tops 500,000 File Requests

    Posted in Bibliographies, Digital Scholarship Publications, Open Access, Scholarly Communication on May 13th, 2012

    As of 4/30/12, the Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals by Charles W. Bailey, Jr. has had over 500,000 file requests. Of those file requests, over 439,000 have been page views (either XHTML files for bibliography sections or PDF files for the entire bibliography).

    In 2005, the bibliography was published by the Association of Research Libraries in print form, and ARL released an open access PDF file as well. The author then added a web site for the bibliography.

    All versions of the bibliography are under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.

    In 2010, the author released a second version of the bibliography, Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography, as a PDF file, a paperback, and a web site under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License. While the first version of the bibliography had a very wide range of included material, the second version, reflecting the rapid maturation of the field, primarily included books and published journal articles.

    Since digital publication in 9/9/10, the second version has had over 153,000 file requests. Of those file requests, over 132,000 have been page views.

    | Research Data Curation Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

    Be Sociable, Share!

      Open Access: Interagency Public Access Coordination: A Report to Congress on the Coordination of Policies Related to the Dissemination and Long-Term Stewardship of the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research

      Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Reports and White Papers on May 8th, 2012

      The Executive Office of the President's National Science and Technology Council has released Interagency Public Access Coordination: A Report to Congress on the Coordination of Policies Related to the Dissemination and Long-Term Stewardship of the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research.

      Here's an excerpt:

      To summarize, the Administration been working on issues related to the management of and access to the results of federally funded scientific research. In accordance with ACRA, OSTP established the Task Force on Public Access to Scholarly Publications and re-chartered the Interagency Working Group on Digital Data under the NSTC CoS. Those groups are evaluating objectives for increasing access to and improving the management of the results of federally funded scientific research.

      Three RFI's have been issued, two on public access to scholarly publications and one on the management of digital data. Responses to those RFIs are being analyzed now, but initial results show strong public support for increasing access to scholarly publications describing the results of federally funded research and for improving scientific data management and access. The NSTC groups are continuing to consider the public comments received from the RFIs and how they should be incorporated into the objectives required by ACRA. Once they have finalized their decisions, the objectives of all three groups will be combined and presented to the CoS. There, agency leadership will consider implementation options. In addition, the CoS will help prioritize the remaining responsibilities as described in ACRA Section 103 including further public consultation and international outreach necessary for developing agency-specific policies.

      | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: "This bibliography is recommended for everyone interested in open access publishing." — M. Blobaum, Journal of the Medical Library Association 100, no. 1 (2012): 73. | Digital Scholarship |

      Be Sociable, Share!

        "Scientific Utopia: I. Opening Scientific Communication"

        Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Scholarly Communication on May 8th, 2012

        Brian A. Nosek and Yoav Bar-Anan have self-archived "Scientific Utopia: I. Opening Scientific Communication" in arXiv.org.

        Here's an excerpt:

        Existing norms for scientific communication are rooted in anachronistic practices of bygone eras, making them needlessly inefficient. We outline a path that moves away from the existing model of scientific communication to improve the efficiency in meeting the purpose of public science—knowledge accumulation. We call for six changes: (1) full embrace of digital communication, (2) open access to all published research, (3) disentangling publication from evaluation, (4) breaking the "one article, one journal" model with a grading system for evaluation and diversified dissemination outlets, (5) publishing peer review, and, (6) allowing open, continuous peer review. We address conceptual and practical barriers to change, and provide examples showing how the suggested practices are being used already. The critical barriers to change are not technical or financial; they are social. While scientists guard the status quo, they also have the power to change it.

        | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010: "SEP [Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography] is compiled with utter professionalism. It reminds me of the work of the best artisans who know not only every item that leaves their workshops, but each component used to create them—providing the ideal quality control." — Péter Jacsó ONLINE 27, no. 3 (2003): 73-76. | Digital Scholarship |

        Be Sociable, Share!

          "Abandoning the Orphans: An Open Access Approach to Hostage Works"

          Posted in Copyright, Open Access on May 7th, 2012

          Lydia Pallas Loren has self-archived "Abandoning the Orphans: An Open Access Approach to Hostage Works" in SSRN.

          Here's an excerpt:

          Metaphors shape how we approach challenging legal issues. Reorienting the metaphor from "orphans" to "hostages" illuminates the real problem with copyright owners that cannot be located: lock-up of expressive works. Solving the hostage work problem requires creating protections for those who act as "special forces" and free the hostages. If an entity is not negligent in gathering and disclosing information that identifies a work as a "hostage work" and that entity provides an open access copy of the work together with the hostage freeing information, then that entity should be immune from monetary liability for infringement. Copyright owners should retain the ability to obtain injunctive relief to either correct inaccurate status or owner information, or obtain removal of the digital copy of the work from an open access database. This injunctive power would translate into an enforceable obligation of open access providers to update inaccurate information and remove works inappropriately designated as hostage works. For derivative work creators, courts should freely apply equitable doctrines to prevent inappropriate injunctive relief and limit the ability of later re-surfacing copyright owners to sue derivative work creators.

          | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

          Be Sociable, Share!

            Benefits of Open Access to Scholarly Research for Voluntary and Charitable Sector Organisations

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 3rd, 2012

            JISC has released Benefits of Open Access to Scholarly Research for Voluntary and Charitable Sector Organisations.

            Here's an excerpt:

            We have learned in this study that the voluntary and charitable sector has an appetite and need for scholarly research that it cannot currently satisfy. The organisations contributing to the study have described the importance of research to the voluntary and charitable sector's commitment to playing its very distinctive role in the most effective way it can. In scoping interviews, case studies and survey responses, VCOs have identified a consistent set of barriers to accessing research. They have shown too that they are creative and resourceful, finding ways to overcome these barriers some of which might place them on or over the border of copyright infringement. We do not think that VCOs should be put in the position of having to choose between what is legally permitted and what they feel is ethically required of them in order to fulfil their charitable objectives. We think too that if the VCS is being asked to expand its role and play an increasing part in delivering public services, then access to research is essential. In this final chapter, we provide some recommendations which, we hope, will go some way to widening the voluntary and charitable sector's access to scholarly research outputs.

            | Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals: This is an excellent resource for its extensive background documentation of the open access arguments and issues. — Ann Jensen, Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, no. 43 (2005) | Digital Scholarship |

            Be Sociable, Share!

              Benefits of Open Access to Scholarly Research to the Public Sector

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 3rd, 2012

              JISC has released Benefits of Open Access to Scholarly Research to the Public Sector.

              Here's an excerpt:

              The total cost to the public sector of accessing journal papers is around £135 million per annum. The savings that accrue from the availability of Open Access articles (using both Green and Gold routes) amount to £28.6 million (£26 million in access fees and £2.6 million in time savings).

              Extending the number or articles available through Open Access further increases the potential for savings. Each extra 5% of journal papers accessed via Open Access would save the public sector £1.7 million, even if no subscription fees were to be saved. Increasing the number of journal papers accessed through Open Access to 25% would save the public sector an extra £29 million.

              | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: "This work gives an outstanding overview of scholarship relating to the growing Open Access movement." — George Machovec, The Charleston Advisor 12, no. 2 (2010): 3. | Digital Scholarship |

              Be Sociable, Share!

                MIT Establishes Open Access Working Group in Response to Elsevier’s New Article Posting Policies

                Posted in Author Rights, Open Access, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 25th, 2012

                MIT has established an Open Access Working Group in response to Elsevier's new article posting policies.

                Here's an excerpt from the "New Open Access Working Group Formed: Formulating Response to Elsevier's Policy Change":

                The wording [of the Elsevier posting policy] is very unclear; no one is quite sure what a "systematic posting mandate" is. Duke, for one, who has an open access policy very much like ours, has concluded that such policies aren't "mandates" since they allow people to opt out, and hence that they are not covered by the new Elsevier posting policy. But it is clear that Elsevier is trying to do what it can to undermine such policies, and to confuse faculty about what they are and are not allowed to do. Certainly that is the interpretation of the Coalition for Open Access Repositories, who, in their response, "strongly oppose the changes made by Elsevier to its article posting policies" and "join the research community in condemning Elsevier for its recent business practices and lobbying that undermine policies and activities promoting open access to scholarly literature."

                | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography| Digital Scholarship |

                Be Sociable, Share!

                  Page 30 of 138« First...1020...2829303132...405060...Last »

                  DigitalKoans

                  DigitalKoans

                  Digital Scholarship

                  Copyright © 2005-2014 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

                  Creative Commons License

                  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.