Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

"Journal of Open Source Software (JOSS): Design And First-Year Review"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 12th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Arfon M. Smith et al. have self-archived "Journal of Open Source Software (JOSS): Design And First-Year Review."

Here's an excerpt:

This article describes the motivation, design, and progress of the Journal of Open Source Software (JOSS). JOSS is a free and open-access journal that publishes articles describing research software. . . . JOSS publishes articles that encapsulate scholarship contained in the software itself, and its rigorous peer review targets the software components: functionality, documentation, tests, continuous integration, and the license. A JOSS article contains an abstract describing the purpose and functionality of the software, references, and a link to the software archive. The article is the entry point of a JOSS submission, which encompasses the full set of software artifacts. Submission and review proceed in the open, on GitHub. Editors, reviewers, and authors work collaboratively and openly. Unlike other journals, JOSS does not reject articles requiring major revision; while not yet accepted, articles remain visible and under review until the authors make adequate changes (or withdraw, if unable to meet requirements). Once an article is accepted, JOSS gives it a DOI, deposits its metadata in Crossref, and the article can begin collecting citations on indexers like Google Scholar and other services. Authors retain copyright of their JOSS article, releasing it under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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"Workflow Development for an Institutional Repository in an Emerging Research Institution"

Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Research Libraries, Self-Archiving on July 11th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Jeanne Hazzard and Stephanie Towery have published "Workflow Development for an Institutional Repository in an Emerging Research Institution" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

We discovered that our faculty retain nearly none of their pre-print or post-print versions of their published articles, and so we are unable to archive those titles in the repository. Nearly 47% of the articles found were in green journals that allow only pre- or post-print copies. Most faculty were unable to produce versions of their work other than the publisher’s PDF, which many publishers restrict from upload into a repository.

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"The Changing Role of Research Publishing: A Case Study from Springer Nature"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 11th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Steven Inchcoombe has published "The Changing Role of Research Publishing: A Case Study from Springer Nature" in Insights: the UKSG Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

Using Springer Nature as a case study this article explores the future of research publishing, with the guiding objective of identifying how such organizations can better serve the needs of researchers and those that support researchers (particularly academic institutions, institutional libraries, research funding bodies and academic societies) as we work together to help advance discovery for the benefit of all. Progress in four key areas is described: improving the publishing process, innovating across science communication, driving the growth and development of open research and adding value beyond publishing. The aim of this article is thus to set out a clear vision of what research publishers can achieve if they especially focus on addressing researchers’ needs and apply their considerable resources and expertise accordingly.

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"Economics and Access 2017"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 3rd, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Walt Crawford has published "Economics and Access 2017" in Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large.

Here's an excerpt:

Now here we are—and it’s time to catch up with a variety of thoughts on economics and access. Most items cited come from 2016 and 2015. As usual, the groupings are somewhat arbitrary and items within a group are usually chronological.

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"Open Access and Promotion and Tenure Evaluation Plans at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science on July 2nd, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Stephanie H. Wical and Gregory J. Kocken have published "Open Access and Promotion and Tenure Evaluation Plans at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire" in Serials Review.

Here's an excerpt:

Department and program evaluation plans at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire were examined to see if these documents provide evidence that could be used to justify supporting the publication of peer-reviewed open access articles toward tenure and promotion. . . .

The existing body of scholarship suggests that tenure-line faculty fear publishing in open access journals because it could adversely impact their chances of promotion and tenure. The authors of this current study sought to determine if department and program evaluation plans could influence negative perceptions faculty have of open access journals.

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"A Reputation Economy: How Individual Reward Considerations Trump Systemic Arguments for Open Access to Data"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science on June 29th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Benedikt Fecher et al. have published "A Reputation Economy: How Individual Reward Considerations Trump Systemic Arguments for Open Access to Data" in Palgrave Communications.

Here's an excerpt:

In this article, we explore the question of what drives open access to research data using a survey among 1564 mainly German researchers across all disciplines. We show that, regardless of their disciplinary background, researchers recognize the benefits of open access to research data for both their own research and scientific progress as a whole. Nonetheless, most researchers share their data only selectively. We show that individual reward considerations conflict with widespread data sharing. Based on our results, we present policy implications that are in line with both individual reward considerations and scientific progress.

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A Look Back at 28 Years as an Open Access Publisher

Posted in Digital Scholarship Publications, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on June 19th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Imagine the Internet without the Web. Imagine that there is no Google or similar search engine. Imagine that the cutting edge Internet applications are e-mail, LISTSERV, FTP, and Telnet (terminal sessions). Imagine that the Internet is made up of a number of different networks, and that the connections between them are not always transparent. Imagine that no established publisher has even experimented with an e-journal. Imagine that the latest mid-range PC has a 6 MHz 16/32-bit 80386SX processor, a 30 MB hard drive, and 2 MB of RAM and costs about $3,900.

That was the situation in June 1989 when I launched PACS-L, a LISTSERV mailing list, after distributing some photocopied handouts at the ALA Annual meeting. PACS-L was one of the first library-oriented mailing lists, and it was unusual in that it had a broad subject focus (public-access computer systems in libraries). PACS-L was sponsored by the University of Houston Libraries. Walt Crawford and Roy Tennant have shared their thoughts about PACS-L in "Talking About Public Access: PACS-L's First Decade" and "Remembering PACS-L."

In August 1989, I launched and began editing The Public-Access Computer Systems Review, one of the first e-journals on the Internet and the first open access journal in the field of library and information science. It was freely available, allowed authors to retain their copyrights, and had special copyright provisions for noncommercial use. It was published by the University of Houston Libraries. Issues were announced via e-mail, and articles were distributed as ASCII files from a LISTSERV. You can find a history of the journal and links to articles and reviews about it in "The Public-Access Computer Systems Review."

In 1996, I established and began writing the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, an open access e-book, which was published in the HTML, PDF, and Word formats. It had 79 subsequent versions. This early e-book was published by the University of Houston Libraries until late 1996. My "Evolution of an Electronic Book: The Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography" article recounts the history of the e-book through 2001.

In 2005, I established Digital Scholarship, and I began to write and publish open access works under Creative Commons licenses. Since then, Digital Scholarship has published PDF books, inexpensive paperback books, XHTML bibliographies, weblogs, Twitter streams, and other works.

Back in 1989, I never thought that a wacky idea and a few handouts would lead to 28 years of digital publishing projects.

You can find a complete chronology of my digital publishing activities in A Look Back at 28 Years as an Open Access Publisher.

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"What I Learned from Predatory Publishers"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 15th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Jeffrey Beall has published "What I Learned from Predatory Publishers" in Biochemia Medica.

Here's an excerpt:

This article is a first-hand account of the author’s work identifying and listing predatory publishers from 2012 to 2017. Predatory publishers use the gold (author pays) open access model and aim to generate as much revenue as possible, often foregoing a proper peer review. The paper details how predatory publishers came to exist and shows how they were largely enabled and condoned by the open-access social movement, the scholarly publishing industry, and academic librarians. The author describes tactics predatory publishers used to attempt to be removed from his lists, details the damage predatory journals cause to science, and comments on the future of scholarly publishing.

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"An Analysis of Federal Policy on Public Access to Scientific Research Data"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science on June 15th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Adam Kriesberg et al. have published "An Analysis of Federal Policy on Public Access to Scientific Research Data" in Data Science Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

The 2013 Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) Memo on federally-funded research directed agencies with research and development budgets above $100 million to develop and release plans to increase and broaden access to research results, both published literature and data. The agency responses have generated discussion and interest but are yet to be analyzed and compared. In this paper, we examine how 19 federal agencies responded to the memo, written by John Holdren, on issues of scientific data and the extent of their compliance to the directives outlined in the memo. We present a varied picture of the readiness of federal science agencies to comply with the memo through a comparative analysis and close reading of the contents of these responses.

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SSRN Launches Biology Research Network (BioRN)

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on June 9th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

SSRN has launched the Biology Research Network (BioRN).

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Biology researchers are able to post preprints and working papers on BioRN, share ideas and other early stage research, and collaborate. It allows users to quickly upload and read abstracts and full-text papers, free of charge. A preprint is the author’s own write-up of research results and analysis that has not been peer-reviewed or had any value added to it by a publisher (such as formatting, copy-editing, technical enhancements). A preprint server, or working paper repository as they are also known, allows users to share these documents.

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"Data Sharing Statements for Clinical Trials—A Requirement of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 8th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Darren B. Taichman et al. have published "Data Sharing Statements for Clinical Trials—A Requirement of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors" in PLOS Medicine.

Here's an excerpt:

Therefore, ICMJE will require the following as conditions of consideration for publication of a clinical trial report in our member journals:

  1. As of July 1, 2018 manuscripts submitted to ICMJE journals that report the results of clinical trials must contain a data sharing statement as described below.
  2. Clinical trials that begin enrolling participants on or after January 1, 2019 must include a data sharing plan in the trial’s registration. The ICMJE's policy regarding trial registration is explained at www.icmje.org/recommendations/browse/publishing-and-editorial-issues/clinical-trial-registration.html. If the data sharing plan changes after registration this should be reflected in the statement submitted and published with the manuscript, and updated in the registry record.

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"Are Open Access Journals Immune from Piracy?"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 7th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Angela Cochran has published "Are Open Access Journals Immune from Piracy?" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

Even though Sci-Hub is billed as providing access to paywalled content, there appear to be thousands of open access articles in the host database. Sci-Hub provided usage of their services from 2015 to Science news writer John Bohannon with the full data set. Reviewing just the data from December 2015, I found that over 200 users accessed PLOS ONE content, over 450 users accessed Hindawi content, and a whopping 2,145 users accessed BioMed Central content.

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