Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

"Finch 18 Months On: A Review of Progress"

Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access on March 13th, 2014

Michael Jubb has published "Finch 18 Months On: A Review of Progress: Based on a Paper Presented at the UKSG One-Day Conference, 'Open Access Realities', London, November 2013" in Insights: the UKSG Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

When the Finch Report was published in June 2012, it represented for me the culmination of nine months of intensive work as secretary to the Finch Group. But I was not allowed to rest on my laurels. The Group recognized that the task of implementation would be complex, involving work from many different stakeholders, and it pointed to the need for an implementation strategy that would involve all of them. Perhaps it should have been firmer in recommending how such a strategy should be developed and implemented. Nevertheless, the Group decided that it should as its final act meet in a year's time to assess progress. I was slightly apprehensive when I was asked to prepare a report for the Group to consider at that meeting. This paper—based on a presentation made at the UKSG conference in November 2013—considers the findings of that report, which was published the following week.

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    Developing an Effective Market for Open Access Article Processing Charges

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on March 13th, 2014

    The Wellcome Trust has released Developing an Effective Market for Open Access Article Processing Charges.

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    In their report, published in March 2014, Björk and Solomon set out a series of scenarios for how funders might develop their approaches for supporting APCs. These cover both full open access journals (which operate exclusively by this model) and so-called hybrid journals (which offer this service for individual articles, while continuing to operate via the subscription model). The authors appraised three combined scenarios, which they conclude to be the most promising for further consideration.

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      Open Access: SPARC Opposes Frontiers in Innovation, Research, Science and Technology Act

      Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access on March 12th, 2014

      SPARC has released a statement opposing the Frontiers in Innovation, Research, Science and Technology Act.

      Here's an excerpt:

      Specifically, Section 303 would:

      • Slow the pace of scientific discovery by restricting public access to articles reporting on federally funded research for up to three years after initial publication. This stands in stark contrast to the policies in use around the world, which call for maximum embargo periods of no more than six to 12 months.
      • Fail to support provisions that allow for shorter embargo periods to publicly funded research results. This provision ignores the potential harm to stakeholders that can accrue through unnecessarily long delays.
      • Fail to ensure that federal agencies have full text copies of their funded research articles to archive and provide to the public for full use, and for long-term archiving. By condoning a link to an article on a publisher's website as an acceptable compliance mechanism, this provision puts the long term accessibility and utility of federally funded research articles at serious risk.
      • Stifle researchers' ability to share their own research and to access the works of others, slowing progress towards scientific discoveries, medical breakthroughs, treatments, and cures.
      • Make it harder for U.S. companies — especially small businesses and start-ups — to access cutting-edge research, thereby slowing their ability to innovate, create new products and services, and generate new jobs.
      • Waste further time and taxpayer dollars by calling for a needless, additional 18-month delay while agencies "develop plans for" policies. This is a duplication of federal agency work that was required by the White House Directive and has, in large part, already been completed.
      • Impose unnecessary costs on federal agency public access programs by conflating access and preservation policies as applied to articles and data. The legislation does not make clear enough what data must be made accessible, nor adequately articulate the location of where such data would reside, or its terms of use.

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        "Coherence of ‘Open’ Initiatives in Higher Education and Research: Framing a Policy Agenda"

        Posted in Open Access on March 11th, 2014

        The "Coherence of 'Open' Initiatives in Higher Education and Research: Framing a Policy Agenda" by Sheila Corrall and Stephen Pinfield is available in IDEALS.

        Here's an excerpt:

        Within this context, our purpose here is to map out the current Open landscape from a policy development perspective, considering in particular the potential for greater coordination between different Open approaches. We first identify the main characteristics of the various Open domains, deploying a broad definition of "Open" to capture the present range of Open initiatives. We next advance and elaborate a high-level typology of Open to inform policy development, and discuss whether the different Open initiatives can be approached in a coordinated way as part of a single coherent policy agenda. We suggest that a framework put forward by Willinsky (2005) for understanding the convergence of open source, OA, and open science can extend to other Open domains. We then outline the potential shared benefits of the different Open approaches, which we argue strengthen the case for convergence, while also commenting on some limits of openness, and we conclude with our observations on the policy implications of our findings.

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          PLOS Clarifies Open Data Policy

          Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 10th, 2014

          PLOS has clarified its open data policy.

          Here's an excerpt:

          In the previous post, and also on our site for PLOS ONE Academic Editors, an attempt to simplify our policy did not represent the policy correctly and we sincerely apologize for that and for the confusion it has caused. We are today correcting that post and hoping it provides the clarity many have been seeking. . . .

          Two key things to summarize about the policy are:

          1. The policy does not aim to say anything new about what data types, forms and amounts should be shared.
          2. The policy does aim to make transparent where the data can be found, and says that it shouldn't be just on the authors' own hard drive.

          Correction

          We have struck out the paragraph in the original PLOS ONE blog post headed "What do we mean by data", as we think it led to much of the confusion. Instead we offer this guidance to authors planning to submit to a PLOS journal.

          What data do I need to make available?

          We ask you to make available the data underlying the findings in the paper, which would be needed by someone wishing to understand, validate or replicate the work. Our policy has not changed in this regard. What has changed is that we now ask you to say where the data can be found.

          As the PLOS data policy applies to all fields in which we publish, we recognize that we'll need to work closely with authors in some subject areas to ensure adherence to the new policy. Some fields have very well established standards and practices around data, while others are still evolving, and we would like to work with any field that is developing data standards. We are aiming to ensure transparency about data availability.

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            University of California Selects Symplectic as Publication Harvesting System Vendor

            Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on March 4th, 2014

            The University of California has selected Symplectic as the vendor for a publication harvesting system.

            Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

            The California Digital Library (CDL), in conjunction with University of California campus partners, has chosen Symplectic as the vendor to implement a publication harvesting system in support of the UC Open Access Policy, passed by the Academic Senate in July 2013.

            Symplectic's flagship product, Elements, will form the basis of a research information management system intended to simplify participation in UC's OA Policy by providing an efficient method for faculty to deposit their research into eScholarship, UC's institutional repository. This system holds great promise for dramatically increasing the rate of deposit of faculty publications in accordance with the policy.

            With a robust set of features that address the specific requirements of the UC OA Policy and the needs of UC authors, Elements will closely monitor publication sources, including public and licensed publication indexes, for any new materials published by UC authors. Once a new publication is detected in the indexes, the system will collect as much information about that publication as possible and contact the author(s) by email for confirmation and manuscript upload. Author-approved publications will then be automatically submitted to eScholarship, where they will be openly available to the public.

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              DuraSpace Launches DSpaceDirect

              Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Repositories, DSpace, DuraSpace, Institutional Repositories, Open Access on March 4th, 2014

              DuraSpace has launched DSpaceDirect.

              Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

              Today the DuraSpace organization is pleased to announce the public launch of DSpaceDirect—the only hosted repository solution for low-cost discovery, access, archiving, and preservation. DSpaceDirect is now available with convenient features that include fast start-up, you-pick customization, no-cost upgrades, content preservation options, anytime data access and all-the-time data control—all at a price that puts solutions for long-term access to digital scholarly assets within reach of institutions of any size. . . .

              Built on DSpace, the most widely-used repository application in the world with more than 1,500 installed instances, DSpaceDirect was inspired by the idea that the past creates the future as each generation builds knowledge on the scholarship that came before. DSpaceDirect is a hosted DSpace repository service that allows institutions of any size to afford to keep their digital content safe and accessible over time. Small institutions are able to get a repository up and running right away that can be made available to patrons as well as to new users worldwide. Users say that the DSpaceDirect easy start-up accelerates discussions about digital content stewardship and preservation best practices at their institutions.

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                "A DSpace Mobile Theme for San Diego State University"

                Posted in Digital Repositories, DSpace, Institutional Repositories, Open Access on March 3rd, 2014

                Mini Vamadevan Pillai has self-archived "A DSpace Mobile Theme for San Diego State University."

                Here's an excerpt:

                This thesis is an attempt to install and customize a DSpace mobile theme for San Diego State University. The work also includes development of additional features like adding navigational bars, adding administrative login capabilities, accessing administrative navigational panel via mobile theme. The mobile theme supports other features like search, advanced search, recent submissions, submissions and workflow. With the widespread use of mobile telephony, providing a mobile theme for SDSU DSpace will reach out to faculty and other interested parties.

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