Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

"CHORUS Gets a Boost from Federal Agencies—But Will New Approaches Make It Harder to Implement?"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on December 1st, 2015

Angela Cochran has published "CHORUS Gets a Boost from Federal Agencies—But Will New Approaches Make It Harder to Implement?" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

Today, CHORUS and the National Science Foundation (NSF) announced an agreement to use CHORUS for facilitating the discovery of NSF funded works. . . .

With the NSF on board, CHORUS has been given a big boost. However, it seems many publishers, whose membership dues are the only source of financial support for CHORUS, have been hanging back to see which agencies will participate.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Be Sociable, Share!

    Using Open Educational Resources, UGA Saves Students $2 Million

    Posted in Open Access on November 30th, 2015

    From 2013-2016, the University of Georgia estimates that it has saved students $2 million .

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    The University of Georgia is actively engaging in the promotion and adoption of OERs by providing faculty members, especially those who teach large enrollment courses, such as those included on the University System of Georgia Top-100 Undergraduate Enrollment list, with resources and assistance to transition away from expensive textbooks to open education resources. Since the OER initiative began in 2013, OERs will have saved UGA student $2 million in textbook costs by the end of 2015-2016.

    Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

    Be Sociable, Share!

      "Criteria for Open Access and Publishing"

      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on November 30th, 2015

      ScienceOpen has released an e-print of "Criteria for Open Access and Publishing" by Tom Olijhoek, Lars Bjørnshauge, and Dominic Mitchell .

      Here's an excerpt:

      This article gives an overview of the history and current status of the DOAJ. After a brief historical overview, DOAJ policies regarding open access, intellectual property rights and questionable publishers are explained in detail. The larger part of this article is a much requested explanation on how DOAJ uses its new set of criteria for the evaluation of open access journals and the rationale behind choosing the seven extra criteria that qualify for the DOAJ Seal. A final section is devoted to the extended possibilities that DOAJ will be offering shortly to scholars and publishers for searching the database and for uploading metadata. The result is a renewed DOAJ that offers a more robust platform, a more stable database and enhanced services to allow the upload and collection of metadata.

      Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

      Be Sociable, Share!

        "Four PLOS Authors Receive 2016 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences"

        Posted in Open Access, People in the News, Scholarly Journals on November 19th, 2015

        PLOS has released "Four PLOS Authors Receive 2016 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences."

        Here's an excerpt:

        This year, four of the five scientists awarded a $3 million Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences chose to publish some of their work in Open Access journals over the course of their careers. In so doing, Edward S. Boyden, Karl Deisseroth, John Hardy and Svante Pääbo ensure their research is available for distribution, discovery and reuse, introducing opportunities for all scientists to build on their discoveries.

        Collectively, the four PLOS authors and Breakthrough Prize winners have published 55 articles in PLOS journals: 35 articles in PLOS ONE, nine articles in PLOS Genetics, eight articles in PLOS Biology and three articles in PLOS Computational Biology. They've also rocked out to the tunes of Pharrell Williams in an Oscar-style ceremony.

        Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

        Be Sociable, Share!

          "Considering Non-Open Access Publication Charges in the ‘Total Cost of Publication’"

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on November 19th, 2015

          Andrew Gray has published "Considering Non-Open Access Publication Charges in the 'Total Cost of Publication'" in Publications.

          Here's an excerpt:

          Recent research has tried to calculate the "total cost of publication" in the British academic sector, bringing together the costs of journal subscriptions, the article processing charges (APCs) paid to publish open-access content, and the indirect costs of handling open-access mandates. This study adds an estimate for the other publication charges (predominantly page and colour charges) currently paid by research institutions, a significant element which has been neglected by recent studies. When these charges are included in the calculation, the total cost to institutions as of 2013/14 is around 18.5% over and above the cost of journal subscriptions—11% from APCs, 5.5% from indirect costs, and 2% from other publication charges.

          Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

          Be Sociable, Share!

            "Campus Open-Access Policy Implementation Models and Implications for IR Services"

            Posted in Open Access, Self-Archiving on November 18th, 2015

            EllenFinnie Duranceau and Sue Kriegsman. have self-archived "Campus Open-Access Policy Implementation Models and Implications for IR Services."

            Here's an excerpt:

            Here, in attempt to build that needed roadmap, we provide a snapshot of the open-access policy implementation landscape by evaluating data from a survey of Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions (COAPI) and characterizing each library's OA policy implementation models for its campus.

            Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

            Be Sociable, Share!

              "The History and Future of Academic Library Collecting in Eleven Pictures"

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries on November 18th, 2015

              David W. Lewis has self-archived "The History and Future of Academic Library Collecting in Eleven Pictures."

              Here's an excerpt:

              In the digital world and using the strategy I have outlined what we have is more like an open checkbook that will purchase the books an articles any library user wants. It is the difference between a public park and giving citizens free ticket s to Disney Land whenever they need recreation. Or, like the difference between a soup kitchen and food stamps.

              Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

              Be Sociable, Share!

                "Reminiscing About 15 Years of Interoperability Efforts"

                Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Linking, Linked Data, and Semantic Web, Open Access on November 17th, 2015

                Herbert Van de Sompel and Michael L. Nelson have published "Reminiscing About 15 Years of Interoperability Efforts" in D-Lib Magazine.

                Here's an excerpt:

                Over the past fifteen years, our perspective on tackling information interoperability problems for web-based scholarship has evolved significantly. In this opinion piece, we look back at three efforts that we have been involved in that aptly illustrate this evolution: OAI-PMH, OAI-ORE, and Memento. Understanding that no interoperability specification is neutral, we attempt to characterize the perspectives and technical toolkits that provided the basis for these endeavors. With that regard, we consider repository-centric and web-centric interoperability perspectives, and the use of a Linked Data or a REST/HATEAOS technology stack, respectively. We also lament the lack of interoperability across nodes that play a role in web-based scholarship, but end on a constructive note with some ideas regarding a possible path forward.

                Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

                Be Sociable, Share!

                  "Examining the Impact of the National Institutes of Health Public Access Policy on the Citation Rates of Journal Articles"

                  Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on November 16th, 2015

                  Sandra L. De Groote et al. have published "Examining the Impact of the National Institutes of Health Public Access Policy on the Citation Rates of Journal Articles" in PLoS One.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  Purpose

                  To examine whether National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded articles that were archived in PubMed Central (PMC) after the release of the 2008 NIH Public Access Policy show greater scholarly impact than comparable articles not archived in PMC. . . .

                  Results

                  A total of 45,716 articles were examined, including 7,960 with NIH-funding. An analysis of the number of times these articles were cited found that NIH-funded 2006 articles in PMC were not cited significantly more than NIH-funded non-PMC articles. However, 2009 NIH funded articles in PMC were cited 26% more than 2009 NIH funded articles not in PMC, 5 years after publication. This result is highly significant even after controlling for journal (as a proxy of article quality and topic).

                  Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

                  Be Sociable, Share!

                    The Future of the Monograph in the Digital Era: A Report to the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

                    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Books on November 13th, 2015

                    Michael Elliott has self-archived The Future of the Monograph in the Digital Era: A Report to the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    Over the course of six months, our working group endeavored to consider whether a model of university-funded monograph publication could improve the publishing landscape for scholars in the humanities and facilitate the "digital transition" that Berkery foresees. Under such a model, a university would bear a high percentage of the publication costs through an initial contract. The university press would produce a high quality, open-access digital publication, as well as make the book available in print form—possibly through print-on-demand.

                    Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

                    Be Sociable, Share!

                      "ARL, Higher Education Groups Support Lingua Editors, Open Access"

                      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on November 13th, 2015

                      ARL has released ""ARL, Higher Education Groups Support Lingua Editors, Open Access."

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      Following in the footsteps of other editors and authors, the six editors and thirty-one editorial board members of the Elsevier journal Lingua resigned on October 27, 2015, in protest of Elsevier's practices. The Lingua editors argued that the journal's price has steadily increased year after year, far outpacing the cost of production. The editors also cited Elsevier's refusal to transition the journal to a "fair open access" model that would charge low and transparent article processing fees for authors, while allowing authors to retain copyright to their articles.

                      Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

                      Be Sociable, Share!

                        "The Institution as E-Textbook Publisher"

                        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, University Presses on November 12th, 2015

                        Andrew Barker has published "The Institution as E-Textbook Publisher" in Insights: the UKSG Journal.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        Providing students with sufficient copies of core textbooks is an increasing challenge in an age of ever higher fees, economic realities and heightened student expectations regarding provision of library resources. This article outlines the partnership between the University of Liverpool Library and Liverpool University Press (LUP), which has progressed from the creation of a library advisory board to the co-creation of two bespoke and open access (OA) e-textbooks as part of a Jisc-funded project. It tells the story of why we have gone down this route at Liverpool and what we hope to gain from the creation of these e-textbooks.

                        Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

                        Be Sociable, Share!

                          Page 5 of 107« First...34567...102030...Last »

                          DigitalKoans

                          DigitalKoans

                          Digital Scholarship

                          Copyright © 2005-2016 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

                          Creative Commons License
                          This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license.