Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

HEFCE and Three Other UK Funding Bodies Enact Open Access Mandate

Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 1st, 2014

The Higher Education Funding Council for England and three other UK funding bodies (the Scottish Funding Council, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and the Department for Employment and Learning) have enacted an open access mandate.

Here's an excerpt:

5. The core of this policy is as follows: to be eligible for submission to the post-2014 REF, outputs must have been deposited in an institutional or subject repository on acceptance for publication, and made open-access within a specified time period. This requirement applies to journal articles and conference proceedings only; monographs and other long-form publications, research data and creative and practice-based research outputs are out of scope. Only articles and proceedings accepted for publication after 1 April 2016 will need to fulfil these requirements, but we would strongly urge institutions to implement the policy now. The policy gives a further list of cases where outputs will not need to fulfil the requirements.

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    "Response to Elsevier’s Text and Data Mining Policy: A LIBER Discussion Paper"

    Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 31st, 2014

    LIBER has released "Response to Elsevier's Text and Data Mining Policy: A LIBER Discussion Paper."

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    LIBER believes that the right to read is the right to mine and that licensing will never bridge the gap in the current copyright framework as it is unscalable and resource intensive. Furthermore, as this discussion paper highlights, licensing has the potential to limit the innovative potential of digital research methods by:

    1. restricting the tools that researchers can use
    2. limiting the way in which research results can be made available
    3. impacting on the transparency and reproducibility of research results.

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      ARL Awarded $1 Million Grant for Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE)

      Posted in ARL Libraries, Open Access, Publishing on March 31st, 2014

      ARL has been awarded a $1 million grant for the Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE).

      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

      The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) has been awarded a joint $1 million grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to develop and launch the Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE) Notification Service. SHARE is a collaborative initiative of ARL, the Association of American Universities (AAU), and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) to ensure the preservation of, access to, and reuse of research findings and reports.

      SHARE aims to make research assets more discoverable and more accessible, and to enable the research community to build upon these assets in creative ways. SHARE's first project, the Notification Service, will inform stakeholders when research results—including articles and data—are released.

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        “The Demand for Out-of-Print Works and Their (Un)Availability in Alternative Markets”

        Posted in Copyright, Publishing on March 20th, 2014

        Paul J. Heald has self-archived “The Demand for Out-of-Print Works and Their (Un)Availability in Alternative Markets.”

        Here's an excerpt:

        Prior studies demonstrate the shocking unavailability of most books published in the 20th Century, prompting The Atlantic Monthly headline: How Copyright Made Mid-Century Books Vanish. The unavailability of new editions of older works would be less problematic, however, if little consumer demand existed for those works. In addition, the lack of new editions would be much less troubling if the works were easily available in alternative forms or markets. Newly collected data provides evidence of the demand for out-of-print books and then charts the availability of out-of-print works in digital form (eBooks and .mp3), in used book stores, and in public libraries. The situation with books remains dismal, although music publishers on iTunes seem to be doing a much better job of digitizing older works and making them available than do book publishers. Some theories for this discrepancy are offered.

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          "Unwrapping the Bundle: An Examination of Research Libraries and the ‘Big Deal’"

          Posted in Electronic Resources, Licenses, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 17th, 2014

          Karla L. Strieb and Julia C. Blixrud have self-archived "Unwrapping the Bundle: An Examination of Research Libraries and the 'Big Deal'."

          Here's an excerpt:

          This study presents and analyzes the findings of a 2012 survey of member libraries belonging to the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) on publishers' large journal bundles and compares the results to earlier surveys. The data illuminate five research questions: market penetration, journal bundle construction, collection format shifts, pricing models, and license terms. The structure of the product is still immature, particularly in defining content and developing sustainable pricing models. The typical "bundle" is something less than the full publishers list. Neither market studies nor market forces have produced a sustainable new strategy for pricing and selling e-journals. Finally, a complex history of managing license terms is revealed in the data.

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            Developing an Effective Market for Open Access Article Processing Charges

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on March 13th, 2014

            The Wellcome Trust has released Developing an Effective Market for Open Access Article Processing Charges.

            Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

            In their report, published in March 2014, Björk and Solomon set out a series of scenarios for how funders might develop their approaches for supporting APCs. These cover both full open access journals (which operate exclusively by this model) and so-called hybrid journals (which offer this service for individual articles, while continuing to operate via the subscription model). The authors appraised three combined scenarios, which they conclude to be the most promising for further consideration.

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              MOOC Content Licensing Solution Launched

              Posted in Copyright, Emerging Technologies, Publishing on March 10th, 2014

              The Copyright Clearance Center has Launched the MOOC Content Licensing Solution.

              Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

              The MOOC Content Licensing Solution uses the current per-page or per-article academic-based pricing rightsholders have established through CCC's Electronic Course Content pay-per-use service. CCC offers digital rights from over 5,000 rightsholders around the world to public, private not-for-profit, and private for-profit U.S.-based institutions of higher education that conduct academic MOOCs.

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                PLOS Clarifies Open Data Policy

                Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 10th, 2014

                PLOS has clarified its open data policy.

                Here's an excerpt:

                In the previous post, and also on our site for PLOS ONE Academic Editors, an attempt to simplify our policy did not represent the policy correctly and we sincerely apologize for that and for the confusion it has caused. We are today correcting that post and hoping it provides the clarity many have been seeking. . . .

                Two key things to summarize about the policy are:

                1. The policy does not aim to say anything new about what data types, forms and amounts should be shared.
                2. The policy does aim to make transparent where the data can be found, and says that it shouldn't be just on the authors' own hard drive.

                Correction

                We have struck out the paragraph in the original PLOS ONE blog post headed "What do we mean by data", as we think it led to much of the confusion. Instead we offer this guidance to authors planning to submit to a PLOS journal.

                What data do I need to make available?

                We ask you to make available the data underlying the findings in the paper, which would be needed by someone wishing to understand, validate or replicate the work. Our policy has not changed in this regard. What has changed is that we now ask you to say where the data can be found.

                As the PLOS data policy applies to all fields in which we publish, we recognize that we'll need to work closely with authors in some subject areas to ensure adherence to the new policy. Some fields have very well established standards and practices around data, while others are still evolving, and we would like to work with any field that is developing data standards. We are aiming to ensure transparency about data availability.

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