Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

"We Can Shift Academic Culture through Publishing Choices" (Version 2)

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 23rd, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Corina J Logan has published "We Can Shift Academic Culture through Publishing Choices" (Version 2) in F1000Research.

Here's an excerpt:

Researchers give papers for free (and often actually pay) to exploitative publishers who make millions off of our articles by locking them behind paywalls. This discriminates not only against the public (who are usually the ones that paid for the research in the first place), but also against the academics from institutions that cannot afford to pay for journal subscriptions and the ‘scholarly poor’. I explain exploitative and ethical publishing practices, highlighting choices researchers can make right now to stop exploiting ourselves and discriminating against others.

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"Prevalence and Citation Advantage of Gold Open Access n the Subject Areas of the Scopus Database"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on August 23rd, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Pablo Dorta-González and Yolanda Santana-Jiménez have self-archived "Prevalence and Citation Advantage of Gold Open Access n the Subject Areas of the Scopus Database."

Here's an excerpt:

In the present paper, an analysis of gold OA from across all areas of research -the 27 subject areas of the Scopus database- is realized. As a novel contribution, this paper takes a journal-level approach to assessing the OA citation advantage, whereas many others take a paper-level approach. Data were obtained from Scimago Lab, sorted using Scopus database, and tagged as OA/non-OA using the DOAJ list. Jointly with the OA citation advantage, the OA prevalence as well as the differences between access types (OA vs. non-OA) in production and referencing are tested. A total of 3,737 OA journals (16.8%) and 18,485 non-OA journals (83.2%) published in 2015 are considered. As the main conclusion, there is no generalizable gold OA citation advantage at journal level.

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"Sustainable Open Access Publishing: Preconditions, Dialog, and Continuous Adaptation: The Stockholm University Press Case"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on August 22nd, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Birgitta Hellmark Lindgren has published "Sustainable Open Access Publishing: Preconditions, Dialog, and Continuous Adaptation: The Stockholm University Press Case" in the Journal of Electronic Publishing..

Here's an excerpt:

Given the demand for open access publishing in the context of expensive article processing charges and acquisition costs scholarly publishing needs to be transformed. I believe that university libraries are in a good position to contribute to this change. I begin with describing what Stockholm University Press is, what we do and how. I continue with describing why we do it and for whom. I conclude by pointing out some lessons learned.

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"Sustainable Book Publishing as a Service at the University of Michigan"

Posted in ARL Libraries, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on August 22nd, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Jason Colman has published "Sustainable Book Publishing as a Service at the University of Michigan" in the Journal of Electronic Publishing.

Here's an excerpt:

To solve this problem [publishing open access books], Michigan Publishing Services has developed both a house service publishing imprint, Maize Books, and a white-labeled book publishing program, branded by University units, all running on the same technical and financial infrastructure. With an emphasis on Open Access with flexible Creative Commons licensing and affordable Print on Demand and EBook options combine workflow efficiencies with a menu of chargeback services to cover the costs of their production and allow staffing to be scaled to meet emerging needs.

This brief case study details Michigan Publishing Services’s program for books as it stands today, explains its approach to sustainability, and offers a few thoughts about when this model is suitable and when it is not.

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Red Light, Green Light: Aligning the Library to Support Licensing

Posted in Licenses, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on August 17th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Ithaka S+R has released Red Light, Green Light: Aligning the Library to Support Licensing.

Here's an excerpt:

There is widespread frustration within the academic library community with the seemingly uncontrollable price increases of e-resources, especially of licensed bundles of scholarly journals. The scholarly communications movement has vastly expanded academic and indeed public access to scholarly content. Yet prices for certain scholarly resources continue to outpace budget increases, and librarians do not feel in control of budgets and pricing. What if libraries found ways to bring together the whole library behind the objective of stabilizing or reducing what they pay?

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"Who is Actually Harmed by Predatory Publishers?"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 16th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Martin Paul Eve and Ernesto Priego have published "Who is Actually Harmed by Predatory Publishers?" in tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique.

Here's an excerpt:

Predatory publishing refers to conditions under which gold open access academic publishers claim to conduct peer review and charge for their publishing services but do not, in fact, actually perform such reviews. Most prominently exposed in recent years by Jeffrey Beall, the phenomenon garners much media attention. In this article, we acknowledge that such practices are deceptive but then examine, across a variety of stakeholder groups, what the harm is from such actions to each group of actors. We find that established publishers have a strong motivation to hype claims of predation as damaging to the scholarly and scientific endeavour while noting that, in fact, systems of peer review are themselves already acknowledged as deeply flawed.

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ACS Launches ChemRxiv

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, EPrints, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on August 16th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

ACS has launched ChemRxiv.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

ChemRxiv, a new chemistry preprint server for the global chemistry community, is now available in a fully functioning Beta version for use and feedback by researchers. The Beta launch has been undertaken with initial strategic input from the American Chemical Society (ACS), Royal Society of Chemistry, German Chemical Society and other not-for profit organizations, as well as other scientific publishers and preprint services. The free-of-charge service, originally announced late last year, is managed on behalf of the chemical science community by ACS and is powered by Figshare, an online digital repository for academic research.

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"Reflections on ‘Elsevier Acquires bepress’: Implications for Library Leaders"

Posted in E-Prints, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Self-Archiving on August 10th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Roger C. Schonfeld has published "Reflections on 'Elsevier Acquires bepress': Implications for Library Leaders" in the Ithaka S+R blog

Here's an excerpt:

If this is the case, libraries adopting standalone institutional repositories are moving in exactly the wrong direction strategically. Instead, thinking more in terms of a workflow as are Elsevier and the Open Science Framework (and to some degree Digital Science) may be the strongest strategy. If this is so, then the urgent question facing institutional repository managers and strategists is how quickly and thoroughly they can integrate into one (or more) such workflows. And, while such integration may not require the kind of platform-first multi-tenant approach to repositories that Digital Commons and OSF Preprints each seems to have developed, it seems like a strong design approach.

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COUNTER Code of Practice, Release 5

Posted in Electronic Resources, Publishing, Scholarly Metrics on August 9th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

COUNTER has released "COUNTER Code of Practice, Release 5 ."

Here's an excerpt:

Release 4 is the current Code of Practice and the requirement for COUNTER-compliance. The effective date for compliance with Release 5 is January 2019. The Transition Timeline and Transition Options graphics explains the detail.

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"Practicing What You Preach: Evaluating Access of Open Access Research"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 8th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Teresa Auch Schultz has self-archived "Practicing What You Preach: Evaluating Access of Open Access Research."

Here's an excerpt:

The open access movement seeks to encourage all researchers to make their works openly available and free of paywalls so more people can access their knowledge. Yet some researchers who study open access (OA) continue to publish their work in paywalled journals and fail to make it open. This project set out to study just how many published research articles about OA fall into this category, how many are being made open (whether by being published in a gold OA or hybrid journal or through open deposit), and how library and information science authors compare to other disciplines researching this field. Because of the growth of tools available to help researchers find open versions of articles, this study also sought to compare how these new tools compare to Google Scholar in their ability to disseminating OA research. From a sample collected from Web of Science of articles published since 2010, the study found that although a majority of research articles about OA are open in some form, a little more than a quarter are not. A smaller rate of library science researchers made their work open compared to non-library science researchers. In looking at the copyright of these articles published in hybrid and open journals, authors were more likely to retain copyright ownership if they printed in an open journal compared to authors in hybrid journals. Articles were more likely to be published with a Creative Commons license if published in an open journal compared to those published in hybrid journals.

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SSRN Launches ChemRN (Chemistry Research Network)

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Publishing, Self-Archiving on August 8th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

SSRN has launched ChemRN

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Chemistry researchers can share ideas and other early stage research, including posting preprints and working papers on ChemRN. Users can quickly upload and read papers for free, across all of Chemistry, including the fields of Energy, Environmental and Materials Sciences.

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"For Second Time, Appeals Court Hears GSU E-Reserves Case"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing, Research Libraries on August 5th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Andrew Albanese has published "For Second Time, Appeals Court Hears GSU E-Reserves Case" in Publishers Weekly.

Here's an excerpt:

In the hearing, which went for just over an hour, a three-judge panel of the 11th Circuit in Atlanta, once again pressed attorneys for the fault lines in the decade-old copyright case, with much of the hearing focusing on whether Judge Orinda Evans correctly evaluated the fourth factor of the four factor fair use test (the effect on the market), and then properly weighted that factor in making her fair use determinations.

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