Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

"The Forbidden Forecast: Thinking About Open Access and Library Subscriptions"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on February 22nd, 2017

Rick Anderson has published "he Forbidden Forecast: Thinking About Open Access and Library Subscriptions" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

In light of all this, it's difficult to avoid the conclusion that those who advocate for Green OA as the preferred mode, and as the more or less universal solution towards which we should all be working, have simply failed to think through the implications of this goal. You cannot make something freely and easily available without undermining the commercial market for that thing.

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"Copyright: The Immoveable Barrier That Open Access Advocates Underestimated"

Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 21st, 2017

Richard Poynder has published "Copyright: The Immoveable Barrier That Open Access Advocates Underestimated."

Here's an excerpt:

In calling for research papers to be made freely available open access advocates promised that doing so would lead to a simpler, less costly, more democratic, and more effective scholarly communication system. To achieve their objectives they proposed two different ways of providing open access: green OA (self-archiving) and gold OA (open access publishing). However, while the OA movement has succeeded in persuading research institutions and funders of the merits of open access, it has failed to win the hearts and minds of most researchers. More importantly, it is not achieving its objectives. There are various reasons for this, but above all it is because OA advocates underestimated the extent to which copyright would subvert their cause.

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EFF Submits Amicus Brief in Cambridge Press v. Georgia State University E-Reserves Copyright Case

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing, Research Libraries on February 20th, 2017

The EFF has submitted an Amicus Brief in the Cambridge Press v. Georgia State University case.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

On behalf of three national library associations, EFF today urged a federal appeals court for the second time to protect librarians' and students' rights to make fair use of excerpts from academic books and research.

Nearly a decade ago, three of the largest academic publishers in the world—backed by the Association of American Publishers (AAP) trade group—sued Georgia State University (GSU) for copyright infringement . . . GSU argued that posting excerpts in the e-reserve systems was a "fair use " of the material, thus not subject to licensing fees. GSU also changed its e-reserve policy to ensure its practices were consistent with a set of fair use best practices that were developed pursuant to a broad consensus among libraries and other stakeholders. . . .

But that was not enough to satisfy the publishers. Rather than declare victory, they've doggedly pursued their claims. It seems the publishers will not be content until universities and libraries agree to further decimate their budgets. As we explain in our brief, that outcome would undermine the fundamental purposes of copyright, not to mention both the public interest, and the interests of the authors of the works in question.

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"Scholarly Journal Publishing in Transition—From Restricted to Open Access"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 20th, 2017

Bo-Christer Björk has self-archived "Scholarly Journal Publishing in Transition—From Restricted to Open Access."

Here's an excerpt:

This article asks the question why Open Access (OA) to the output of mainly publicly funded research hasn’t yet become the mainstream business model. OA implies a reversal of the revenue logic from readers paying for content to authors paying for dissemination in form of universal free access. The current situation is analyzed using Porter’s five forces model. The analysis demonstrates a lack of competitive pressure in this industry, leading to so high profit levels of the leading publishers that they have not yet felt a strong need to change the way they operate. OA funded by article publishing charges (APCs) might nevertheless start rapidly becoming more common. The driving forces of change currently consist of the public research funders and administrations in Europe, which are pushing for OA by starting dedicated funds for paying the APCs of authors from the respective countries. This has in turn lead to a situation in which publishers have introduced "big deals" involving the bundling of (a) subscription to all their journals, (b) APCs for their hybrid journals and (c) in the future also APCs to their full OA journals.

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PLOS Releases Ambra Journal Publishing Software Under MIT License

Posted in Open Access, Open Source Software, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 17th, 2017

PLOS has released its Ambra publishing journal software under the MIT License.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

This isn’t the first time Ambra was available to those looking for a journal publishing platform. Under continuous development since 2009, Ambra was a monolithic Struts webapp offered as open source since its beginning. In 2012, PLOS began a project to re-architect Ambra as a service-oriented, multi-component stack. PLOS has been actively using, testing, and improving these new components in its journal platform since 2013, and in early 2016 we replaced the legacy Ambra webapp in its entirety. Having sorted through some minor license incompatibilities and put together documentation and quickstart guides, we’re proud to release Ambra under the MIT License

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"No Scholar Is an Island: The Impact of Sharing in the Work Life of Scholars"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 13th, 2017

Carol Tenopir et al. have published "No Scholar Is an Island: The Impact of Sharing in the Work Life of Scholars" in .

Here's an excerpt:

In an international survey of 1,000 published scholars, the Beyond Downloads project examined their sharing behaviours in order to gain a more contextualized and accurate picture of their usage beyond download patterns and citation counts. Scholars share published articles with others as a mode of content discovery and dissemination, particularly if they work in groups, and most expect to increase their sharing in the future.

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"What Does ‘Green’ Open Access Mean? Tracking Twelve Years of Changes to Journal Publisher Self-Archiving Policies"

Posted in E-Prints, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on February 13th, 2017

Elizabeth Gadd and Denise Troll Covey have self-archived "What Does 'Green' Open Access Mean? Tracking Twelve Years of Changes to Journal Publisher Self-Archiving Policies."

Here's an excerpt:

Traces the 12-year self-archiving policy journey of the original 107 publishers listed on the SHERPA/RoMEO Publisher Policy Database in 2004, through to 2015. Maps the RoMEO colour codes 'green', 'blue', 'yellow' and 'white') and related restrictions and conditions over time. Finds that while the volume of publishers allowing some form of self-archiving (pre-print, post-print or both) has increased by 12% over the twelve years, the volume of restrictions around how, where, and when self-archiving may take place has increased 119%, 190% and 1000% respectively.

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How Americans Encounter, Recall and Act Upon Digital News

Posted in Digital Culture, Publishing on February 10th, 2017

The Pew Research Center has released How Americans Encounter, Recall and Act Upon Digital News.

Here's an excerpt:

When asked how they arrived at news content in their most recent web interaction, online news consumers were about equally likely to get news by going directly to a news website (36% of the times they got news, on average) as getting it through social media (35%). They were less likely to access news through emails, text messages or search engines. . . .

Among the five pathways studied, news instances spurred by emails and texts from friends or family elicited the most activity; nearly three-quarters (73%) of these instances were acted upon in some way. That outpaced even social media and direct visits to a news organization’s website, where a follow-up action occurred in about half of news instances (53% and 47%, respectively).

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"Updating the Agenda for Academic Libraries and Scholarly Communications"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on February 9th, 2017

Clifford Lynch has published "Updating the Agenda for Academic Libraries and Scholarly Communications" in College & Research Libraries.

Here's an excerpt:

This issue of C&RL is focused on scholarly communication, and it seems appropriate, in this invited guest editorial, to step back and examine the broader agenda that academic and research libraries need to consider today in engaging with scholarly communications as a way of framing the issue. My view is that this agenda is ripe for re-thinking. The overall environment has changed significantly in the last few years, underscoring the growing irrelevance of some long-held ideas, and at the same time, clearly identifying new and urgent priorities. What I hope to do here is to summarize very succinctly my thoughts on the most pressing issues and the areas most needing reconsideration. Articles in this issue touch upon aspects of many of these topics; I hope that future authors may also find topical inspirations here.

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"An Empirical Study of Law Journal Copyright Practices"

Posted in Copyright, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 9th, 2017

Brian L. Frye, Christopher J. Ryan, Jr., and Franklin L. Runge have published "An Empirical Study of Law Journal Copyright Practices" in the Review of Intellectual Property Law.

Here's an excerpt:

This article presents an empirical study of the copyright practices of American law journals in relation to copyright ownership and fair use, based on a 24-question survey. It concludes that many American law journals have adopted copyright policies that are inconsistent with the expectations of legal scholars and the scope of copyright protection. Specifically, many law journals have adopted copyright policies that effectively preclude open-access publishing, and unnecessarily limit the fair use of copyrighted works. In addition, it appears that some law journals may not understand their own copyright policies. This article proposes the creation of a Code of Copyright Best Practices for Law Journals in order to encourage both open-access publishing and fair use.

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"E-Data Quality: How Publishers and Libraries are Working Together to Improve Data Quality"

Posted in Electronic Resources, Metadata, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on February 7th, 2017

Carlen Ruschoff et al. have published "Data Quality: How Publishers and Libraries are Working Together to Improve Data Quality " in Collaborative librarianship.

Here's an excerpt:

High quality data is essential for discovery and access of e-resources, but in many cases low quality, inaccurate information leads to low usage and a poor return on library investment dollars. In this article, publishers, aggregators, librarians, and knowledge base providers talk about how they are working together to improve access to e-resources.

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"Pay What You Want as a Pricing Model for Open Access Publishing?"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 6th, 2017

Lucas Stich. Martin Spann. and Klaus M. Schmidt have self-archived "Pay What You Want as a Pricing Model for Open Access Publishing?"

Here's an excerpt:

We analyze "Pay What You Want" as a business model for Open Access publishing by discussing motives leading authors to make voluntary contributions, potential benefits for publishers and present results from a field experiment at one publisher. Data from the field experiment indicate authors’ willingness to voluntarily contribute.

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