Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

"Wall Street Analysts Say Open Access Has Failed Due to Lack of Focus, but Their Analysis Might Help It Succeed"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on October 14th, 2014

Curt Rice has published "Wall Street Analysts Say Open Access Has Failed Due to Lack of Focus, but Their Analysis Might Help It Succeed" in The LSE's Daily Blog on American Politics and Policy.

Here's an excerpt:

The absence of clear leadership at the helm of the open access movement is made painfully clear in a recent report about Elsevier's value as a company, entitled Goodbye to Berlin—The Fading Threat of Open Access. Why could the authors of this report at Bernstein Research let go of their earlier concerns and now upgrade their predictions about Elsevier's stock? "The rise of OA," they write, "has inflicted little or no damage on the leading subscription publishers."

Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

Be Sociable, Share!

    "Journals and ‘Journals': Taking a Deeper Look"

    Posted in Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on October 14th, 2014

    Walt Crawford has published "Journals and 'Journals': Taking a Deeper Look" in Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large.

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    This essay builds on the July 2014 Cites & Insights investigation by including full article counts for the thousands of OA journals in Beall's lists (that is, those that actually publish articles!) and those published by OASPA members, extending the article counts back to 2011, and modifying the groups of journals to be more meaningful.

    It also introduces the rough numbers for the new set of Gold OA journals that will form the heart of Part 2 of this two-part essay (the December 2014 C&I), namely more than three thousand journals in the Directory of Open Access Journals as of May 7, 2014 that aren't in one of the other two sets, that do have enough English in the interface for me to analyze them and that are not on biology-related or human medicine-related topics.

    Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

    Be Sociable, Share!

      "Codifying Collegiality: Recent Developments in Data Sharing Policy in the Life Sciences "

      Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Legislation and Government Regulation, Publishing on September 30th, 2014

      Genevieve Pham-Kanter et al. have published "Codifying Collegiality: Recent Developments in Data Sharing Policy in the Life Sciences " in PLOS ONE.

      Over the last decade, there have been significant changes in data sharing policies and in the data sharing environment faced by life science researchers. Using data from a 2013 survey of over 1600 life science researchers, we analyze the effects of sharing policies of funding agencies and journals. We also examine the effects of new sharing infrastructure and tools (i.e., third party repositories and online supplements). We find that recently enacted data sharing policies and new sharing infrastructure and tools have had a sizable effect on encouraging data sharing. In particular, third party repositories and online supplements as well as data sharing requirements of funding agencies, particularly the NIH and the National Human Genome Research Institute, were perceived by scientists to have had a large effect on facilitating data sharing. In addition, we found a high degree of compliance with these new policies, although noncompliance resulted in few formal or informal sanctions. Despite the overall effectiveness of data sharing policies, some significant gaps remain: about one third of grant reviewers placed no weight on data sharing plans in their reviews, and a similar percentage ignored the requirements of material transfer agreements. These patterns suggest that although most of these new policies have been effective, there is still room for policy improvement.

      Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

      Be Sociable, Share!

        "The Imperative for Open Altmetrics"

        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Metrics on September 29th, 2014

        Stacy Konkiel, Heather Piwowar, and Jason Priem have published "The Imperative for Open Altmetrics" in The Journal of Electronic Publishing.

        Here's an excerpt:

        If scholarly communication is broken, how will we fix it? At Impactstory—a non-profit devoted to helping scholars gather and share evidence of their research impact by tracking online usage of scholarship via blogs, Wikipedia, Mendeley, and more—we believe that incentivizing web-native research via altmetrics is the place to start. In this article, we describe the current state of the art in altmetrics and its effects on publishing, we share Impactstory's plan to build an open infrastructure for altmetrics, and describe our company's ethos and actions.

        Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

        Be Sociable, Share!

          "The Research Data Alliance: Globally Co-Ordinated Action against Barriers to Data Publishing and Sharing"

          Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Publishing on September 29th, 2014

          Andrew Treloar has published "The Research Data Alliance: Globally Co-Ordinated Action against Barriers to Data Publishing and Sharing" in a special issue of Learned Publishing on data publishing.

          Here's an excerpt:

          This article discusses the drivers behind the formation of the Research Data Alliance (RDA), its current state, the lessons learned from its first full year of operation, and its anticipated impact on data publishing and sharing. One of the pressing challenges in data infrastructure (taken here to include issues relating to hardware, software and content format, as well as human actors) is how best to enable data interoperability across boundaries. This is particularly critical as the world deals with bigger and more complex problems that require data and insights from a range of disciplines. The RDA has been set up to enable more data to be shared across barriers to address these challenges. It does this through focused Working Groups and Interest Groups, formed of experts from around the world, and drawing from the academic, industry, and government sectors.

          Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

          Be Sociable, Share!

            Nature Communications Goes Full Open Access

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 23rd, 2014

            Formerly a born-digital hybrid journal, Nature Communications will now be an open access only journal.

            Here's an excerpt from the press release:

            Nature Communications is to become the first Nature-branded open access only journal. The number one open access journal in multidisciplinary sciences, Nature Communications is Nature Publishing Group's (NPG) flagship open access title. Nature Communications will only accept open access research submissions from 20th October 2014. . . .

            NPG is also making further policy moves with this development. Nature Communications now offers the CC BY 4.0 license as default, with other Creative Commons (CC) licenses available upon request. There is no price difference for the choice of CC license. APC waivers will be available for HINARI countries, and to others on a case-by-case basis.

            Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

            Be Sociable, Share!

              CERN and APS Announce Open Access Partnership

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 19th, 2014

              American Physical Society and The European Organization for Nuclear Research have formed a partnership to make CERN-authored articles published in APS journals open access.

              Here's an excerpt from the press release:

              Articles in APS' Physical Review Letters, Physical Review D, and Physical Review C in 2015 and 2016 will be covered by this agreement.

              Thanks to this partnership, articles will be available free of charge for everyone to read. Copyright will remain with the authors and permissive Creative Commons CC-BY licences will allow re-use of the information (e.g. in books, review articles, conference proceedings and teaching material) as well as text- and data-mining applications.

              Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

              Be Sociable, Share!

                "Open Access Infrastructure: Where We Are and Where We Need to Go"

                Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing on September 18th, 2014

                Cynthia Hodgson has published "Open Access Infrastructure: Where We Are and Where We Need to Go" in Information Standards Quarterly.

                Here's an excerpt:

                There's no doubt that open access is here to stay, but the underlying infrastructure needed to support and sustain OA publishing is still very much in its development stages. This article, through a series of interviews with experts in the OA arena, highlights some of the major areas of infrastructure that are needed including institutional policies, compliance tracking and reporting, publishing tools, new economic models and licensing, and sustainability.

                Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

                Be Sociable, Share!

                  Page 4 of 113« First...23456...102030...Last »

                  DigitalKoans

                  DigitalKoans

                  Digital Scholarship

                  Copyright © 2005-2014 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

                  Creative Commons License

                  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.