Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

ICOLC “Statement on the Global Economic Crisis and Its Impact on Consortial Licenses” Reissued

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on June 20th, 2010

The International Coalition of Library Consortia (ICOLC) has updated and reissued its "Statement on the Global Economic Crisis and Its Impact on Consortial Licenses."

Here's an excerpt:

The ICOLC is reissuing its Statement on the Global Economic Crisis to update information providers on the state of library and library consortia budgets in 2010. The updates below reinforce the ICOLC Statement in three substantial ways.

  1. ICOLC did not overestimate the severity of cuts to library and library consortia funding levels in its original Statement. Furthermore, we believe the worst may still be before us, as US state governments suffer the loss of stimulus funds and continued weak regional economies. All parts of the world are facing negative economic repercussions from the European debt crisis. The need for pricing restraint and options remains paramount.
  2. Fifty ICOLC member groups from around the world have participated in an anonymous survey to measure 2009 to 2010 price changes from over 30 major vendors and publishers of electronic databases and journals. This survey reveals that 38% of the price changes provided price control in the form of 1% increases or less. Seven percent (7%) of the price changes provided price reductions. We wish to commend those suppliers who have worked with libraries and consortia to contain prices. However, significant room for improvement remains. Some suppliers have done a much better job of containing prices than others. We call upon the full range of suppliers to show price restraint in 2010-2011 to enable customers to sustain as many information resource licenses as possible.
  3. We take this opportunity to highlight the added potential negative impact of exclusivity on prices, as well as access. A new Principle 3 on page 3 of this document expresses the strongly held belief of ICOLC members that, over the long-term, multiple distribution channels for licensed content provide the most affordable and suitable options for access across diverse library communities.
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    Swiss National Library Launches eBooks on Demand, a Fee-Based Digitization-on-Demand Service

    Posted in Digitization, E-Books, Publishing on June 6th, 2010

    The Swiss National Library has launched eBooks on Demand.

    Here's an excerpt from the press release:

    The Swiss National Library (NL) now offers a digitisation on request service for out of copy-right books. This new paid service is known as "eBooks on Demand" (EOD). The NL already lists more than 100,000 books available for digitisation, which can be provided as a PDF to customers. . . .

    To date, more than 100,000 books (mainly older publications, since only they are not under copyright) are available on request in digitised form, and can be delivered to users as an e-mail attachment, or by post on a CD.

    Such works are marked in the online catalogue Helveticat (www.nb.admin.ch/helveticat) with the EOD symbol, which serves as a link to the order form. Submitting a form triggers an invoice; once this is paid, the reader receives the eBook. On request, for a small supplement, a paperback may also be supplied.

    "eBooks on Demand" is a project of the NL and over 20 other libraries in ten European countries (www.books2ebooks.eu).

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      "Interview with Sarah Pritchard: The Changing Face of Academic Presses"

      Posted in Publishing, University Presses on June 1st, 2010

      Information Today has published "Interview with Sarah Pritchard: The Changing Face of Academic Presses." Pritchard is the University Librarian at Northwestern University.

      Here's an excerpt:

      Q: The model that many advocate for OA books is making the text freely available online but sell the print version, so that etext will drive print sales. Do you see it as a viable model for NUP [Northwestern University Press]?

      A: Absolutely, I see that as a very logical model, and I would envisage us moving to that model before we move to a totally OA environment. By the way, we are currently in the process of moving one of our journals to OA, which we are very excited about . . . TriQuarterly.

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        "The Google Book Settlement and the TRIPS Agreement"

        Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Books, Google and Other Search Engines, Mass Digitizaton, Publishing on May 23rd, 2010

        Daniel J. Gervais has self-archived "The Google Book Settlement and the TRIPS Agreement" in SSRN.

        Here's an excerpt:

        The proposed amended settlement in the Google Book case has been the focus of numerous comments and critiques. This "perspective" reviews the compatibility of the proposed settlement with the TRIPS Agreement and relevant provisions of the Berne Convention that were incorporated into TRIPS, in particular the no-formality rule, the most-favored nation (MFN) clause, national treatment obligations, and the so-called three-step test, which constrains the ability of WTO Members to provide new exceptions and limitations to copyright rights.

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          Digital Video of Intellectual Property Breakfast Club Session on Google Book Settlement

          Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Books, Google and Other Search Engines, Mass Digitizaton, Publishing on May 20th, 2010

          BroadbandBreakfast.com has released a digital video of the Intellectual Property Breakfast Club's the Google Book Search Settlement and E-Book Licensing session on May 11, 2010.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          The panelists included:

          • Jonathan Band, Counsel, Library Copyright Alliance
          • Michael Capobianco, Vice President, Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America
          • Sherwin Siy, Deputy Legal Director, Public Knowledge
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            Cynthia S. Arato's Analysis of the Google Books Settlement

            Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Books, Google and Other Search Engines, Mass Digitizaton, Publishing on May 10th, 2010

            Cynthia S. Arato, a Partner at Macht, Shapiro, Arato & Isserles, has sent an eighteen-page memo on the Google Books Settlement to the Open Book Alliance that summarizes "the objections and argument that we lodged against the proposed settlement of the 'Google Books' lawsuit on behalf of leading foreign publishing and authors' associations, foreign publishers, and foreign authors."

            Here's an excerpt:

            Numerous provisions of the proposed Google Books settlement would, if approved, violate the treaty obligations of the U.S. For this reason, and because of its myriad other defects, the settlement should not be approved by the court. If the settlement is approved, it may give rise to legal action against the U.S. before an international tribunal and will certainly expose the U.S. to diplomatic stress.

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              Digital Video of Copyright, Content and Class Action Lawsuits: A Debate on the Google Book Search Settlement Meeting

              Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Books, Google and Other Search Engines, Mass Digitizaton, Publishing on May 4th, 2010

              The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation has released a digital video of its Copyright, Content and Class Action Lawsuits: A Debate on the Google Book Search Settlement meeting.

              Participants included:

              • Daniel Castro, Senior Analyst, Information Technology and Innovation Foundation
              • Allan Adler, Vice President of Government Affairs, Association of American Publishers,
              • Peter Brantley, Director of Access, Internet Archive
              • Dan Clancy, Engineering Director, Google Book Search
              • Alan Inouye, Director, Office for Information Policy, American Library Association
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                Peer Review in Academic Promotion and Publishing: Its Meaning, Locus, and Future

                Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication on May 2nd, 2010

                The Center for Studies in Higher Education has released Peer Review in Academic Promotion and Publishing: Its Meaning, Locus, and Future.

                Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                As part of its Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded Future of Scholarly Communication Project, the Center for Studies in Higher Education (CSHE) has hosted two meetings to explore how peer review relates to scholarly communication and academic values. In preparation for an April 2010 workshop, four working papers were developed and circulated. They are presented as drafts here. . . .

                The topics of the working papers are: (1) Peer Review in Academic Promotion and Publishing: Norms, Complaints, and Costs, (2) New Models of Peer Review: Repositories, Open Peer Review, and Post Publication Metrics, (3) Open Access: Green OA, Gold OA, and University Resolutions, and (4) Creating New Publishing and Peer Review Models: Scholarly Societies, Presses, Libraries, Commercial Publishers, and Other Stakeholders.

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                  "Seeking the New Normal: Periodicals Price Survey 2010"

                  Posted in Libraries, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on April 15th, 2010

                  Kittie S. Henderson & Stephen Bosch have published "Seeking the New Normal: Periodicals Price Survey 2010" in Library Journal.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  A number of publishers upped prices for 2010. Springer announced a five percent increase. Elsevier price increases are also in the five percent range, with the notable exception of The Lancet. The 2010 price for The Lancet jumped nine percent over 2009 levels; that increase was still smaller than in previous years. In October, the library world reeled as Nature Publishing Group (NPG) announced a 640 percent price increase (from $39.95 in 2009 to $299 in 2010) for a print subscription to Scientific American. The cost for the digital site license also rose substantially, and a number of consortia, like the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC) and the Oberlin Group, refused to renew. The announcement came only weeks after NPG bought the magazine.

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                    U.S. Book Sales Fell 1.8% in 2009

                    Posted in Publishing on April 13th, 2010

                    The Association of American Publishers reports that U.S. book sales fell 1.8% in 2009.

                    Here's an excerpt from the press release:

                    The Association of American Publishers (AAP) has today released its annual estimate of total book sales in the United States. The report, which uses data from the Bureau of the Census as well as sales data from eighty-six publishers inclusive of all major book publishing media market holders, estimates that U.S. publishers had net sales of $23.9 billion in 2009, down from $24.3 billion in 2008, representing a 1.8% decrease. In the last seven years the industry had a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 1.1%.

                    Trade sales of adult and juvenile books were steady at $8.1 billion in 2009, CAGR fell to 1.8 percent. Adult Hardbound books showed healthy growth of 6.9%, $2.6 billion in 2009, however paperbound books for adult fell 5.2% to $2.2 billion. Hardbound books in the children and young adult category fell 5.0% to $1.7 billion while their paperbound equivalent grew 2.2% to $1.5 billion. . . .

                    Mass Market paperbacks decreased 4.0% and brought the category CAGR to -2.2%. Total sales were $1.0 billion in 2009. . . .

                    Educational sales in the Elementary and High School (El-Hi) category, those books produced for K-12 education, fell 13.8% to $5.2 billion in 2009, and CAGR for this category was -1.4%. The Higher Education category, which includes sales of college textbooks reached $4.3 billion this year up 12.9% on 2008. This brought the CAGR for college textbooks to 5.0%.

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                      E-Reserves and Copyright: "Georgia State and (Un)Fair Use: A Rebuttal to Kenneth Crews"

                      Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing on April 13th, 2010

                      Sanford G. Thatcher has published "Georgia State and (Un)Fair Use: A Rebuttal to Kenneth Crews" in Against the Grain. This paper examines an expert report by Crews in the important Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al. e-reserves copyright case.

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                        How Much has John Wiley & Sons' Stock Risen Since 1978?

                        Posted in Publishing on April 11th, 2010

                        From 1/13/78 through 4/9/10, John Wiley & Sons' stock (NYSE:JW.A) has risen 7,451%, easily beating the 1,223% rise of the Dow and the 1,203% rise of the S&P 500. (Go to http://www.google.com/finance?q=NYSE:JW.A and click on Zoom: Max.)

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