Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

"Researchers’ Adoption of an Institutional Central Fund for Open-Access Article-Processing Charges: A Case Study Using Innovation Diffusion Theory"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 18th, 2016

Stephen Pinfield and Christine Middleton have published "Researchers' Adoption of an Institutional Central Fund for Open-Access Article-Processing Charges: A Case Study Using Innovation Diffusion Theory" in SAGE Open.

Here's an excerpt:

This article analyzes researchers' adoption of an institutional central fund (or faculty publication fund) for open-access (OA) article-processing charges (APCs) to contribute to a wider understanding of take-up of OA journal publishing ("Gold" OA). Quantitative data, recording central fund usage at the University of Nottingham from 2006 to 2014, are analyzed alongside qualitative data from institutional documentation. The importance of the settings of U.K. national policy developments and international OA adoption trends are considered. Innovation Diffusion Theory (IDT) is used as an explanatory framework.

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Converting Scholarly Journals to Open Access: A Review of Approaches and Experiences

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on March 17th, 2016

The Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication has released a draft of Converting Scholarly Journals to Open Access: A Review of Approaches and Experiences for comment.

Here's an excerpt:

This report identifies ways through which subscription-based scholarly journals have converted their publishing models to open access (OA). The major goal was to identify specific scenarios that have been used or proposed for transitioning subscription journals to OA so that these scenarios can provide options for others seeking to "flip" their journals to OA.

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"The FAIR Guiding Principles for Scientific Data Management and Stewardship"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science, Publishing on March 17th, 2016

Mark D. Wilkinson et al. have published "The FAIR Guiding Principles for Scientific Data Management and Stewardship" in Scientific Data.

Here's an excerpt:

A diverse set of stakeholders-representing academia, industry, funding agencies, and scholarly publishers-have come together to design and jointly endorse a concise and measurable set of principles that we refer to as the FAIR Data Principles. The intent is that these may act as a guideline for those wishing to enhance the reusability of their data holdings.

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"Creative Commons Licenses: Empowering Open Access"

Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing on March 14th, 2016

Thomas Margoni and Diane M. Peters have self-archived "Creative Commons Licenses: Empowering Open Access."

Here's an excerpt:

Open access (OA) is a concept that in recent years has acquired popularity and widespread recognition. International statements and scholarly analysis converge on the following main characteristics of open access: free availability on the public Internet, permission for any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, and link to the full texts of these articles, crawl them for indexing, pass them as data to software, and use them for any other lawful purpose, without financial, legal, or technical barriers other than those inseparable from gaining access to the Internet itself. The only legal constraint on reproduction and distribution, and the only role for copyright in this domain, should be to give authors control over the integrity of their work and the right to be properly acknowledged and cited.

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"Publication Phishing: A Growing Challenge for Researchers and Scientific Societies"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 10th, 2016

Shahryar Sorooshian has published "Publication Phishing: A Growing Challenge for Researchers and Scientific Societies" in Current Science.

Here's an excerpt:

Specifically, hijacked journals are those that scam researchers using identifiers and reputation of their original counterpart. These fraudsters present themselves as the principal journal editors by designing an on-line website for existing journals that offers print-only access, but lacks on-line or electronic access

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"Three Years after the OSTP Public Access Directive: A Progress Report"

Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 10th, 2016

Fred Dylla has published "Three Years after the OSTP Public Access Directive: A Progress Report" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

So three years out from the directive, 1) public access policy is in place for 98% of the research funding from US federal agencies starting in the last year, 2) a robust article identification system is in place from Crossref that is already tracking more than 11,000 funding agencies worldwide, 3) CHORUS, a public-private partnership, is actively assisting the agencies with implementing their public access plans, 4) TDM solutions are beginning to appear, and 5) agencies, supported by various stakeholders, are making some headway on data management.

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"Developing Infrastructure to Support Closer Collaboration of Aggregators with Open Repositories"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on March 9th, 2016

Nancy Pontika et al. have published "Developing Infrastructure to Support Closer Collaboration of Aggregators with Open Repositories" in Liber Quarterly.

Here's an excerpt:

The COnnecting REpositories (CORE) project has been dealing with these challenges by aggregating and enriching content from hundreds of open access repositories, increasing the discoverability and reusability of millions of open access manuscripts. As repository managers and library directors often wish to know the details of the content harvested from their repositories and keep a certain level of control over it, CORE is now facing the challenge of how to enable content providers to manage their content in the aggregation and control the harvesting process. In order to improve the quality and transparency of the aggregation process and create a two-way collaboration between the CORE project and the content providers, we propose the CORE Dashboard.

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"Making OA Monographs Happen: Library-Press Collaboration at the University of Ottawa, Canada"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, University Presses on March 8th, 2016

Tony Horava has published "Making OA Monographs Happen: Library-Press Collaboration at the University of Ottawa, Canada" in Insights: The UKSG Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

At the University of Ottawa, Canada, the UO Press and the UO Library have developed a strategic partnership to publish and disseminate selected new monographs as gold open access (OA). Starting in 2013, the Library agreed to fund three books at C$10,000 per book (a total of C$30,000 per year) in order to remove barriers to accessing scholarship and to align with scholarly communication goals of the University. In 2015 this agreement was renewed for another three years and the funding was increased to cover four books (a total of C$40,000 per year). Ten titles have so far been published under this model. The data reveals that there have been 12,629 downloads as well as 16,584 page views of these titles, as of September 2015. There have been over 4,700 copies (print and EPUB) sold in spite of the free availability of the PDF version.

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"Making Sense of Journal Research Data Policies"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 8th, 2016

Linda Naughton and David Kernohan have published "Making Sense of Journal Research Data Policies" in Insights: The UKSG Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

This article gives an overview of the findings from the first phase of the Jisc Journal Research Data Policy Registry pilot (JRDPR), which is currently under way. . . . The project undertook an analysis of 250 journal research data policies to assess the feasibility of developing a policy registry to assist researchers and support staff to comply with research data publication requirements. The evidence shows that the current research data policy ecosystem is in critical need of standardization and harmonization if such services are to be built and implemented. To this end, the article proposes the next steps for the project with the objective of ultimately moving towards a modern research infrastructure based on machine-readable policies that support a more open scholarly communications environment.

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"Big Publishers, Bigger Profits: How the Scholarly Community Lost the Control of Its Journals"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on March 3rd, 2016

Vincent Larivière, Stefanie Haustein, and Philippe Mongeon have published "Big Publishers, Bigger Profits: How the Scholarly Community Lost the Control of Its Journals" in MediaTropes.

Here's an excerpt:

Despite holding the potential to liberate scholarly information, the digital era has, to the contrary, increased the control of a few for-profit publishers. While most journals in the print era were owned by academic institutions and scientific societies, the majority of scientific papers are currently published by five for-profit publishers, which often exhibit profit margins between 30%-40%. This paper documents the evolution of this consolidation over the last 40 years, discusses the peculiar economics of scholarly publishing, and reflects upon the role of publishers in today's academe.

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"Beams of Particles and Papers. The Role of Preprint Archives in High Energy Physics"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on March 3rd, 2016

Alessandro Delfanti has self-archived "Beams of Particles and Papers. The Role of Preprint Archives in High Energy Physics."

Here's an excerpt:

The role of preprint archives is also highlighted by the existence of viXra.org, arXiv's evil twin. This dissenting and independent archive, that mimics the appearance and functioning of the original one, is aimed at overcoming the forms of policing that keep undesired papers outside of arXiv. ViXra claims to be " truly open" and to serve "the whole scientific community." In fact, the review processes enforced by arXiv are seen as failing to meet the standards of openness preprint archives are supposed to live up to.

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"Persistent URIs Must Be Used to Be Persistent"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 2nd, 2016

Herbert Van de Sompel, Martin Klein, and Shawn M. Jones have self-archived "Persistent URIs Must Be Used to Be Persistent."

Here's an excerpt:

We quantify the extent to which references to papers in scholarly literature use persistent HTTP URIs that leverage the Digital Object Identifier infrastructure. We find a significant number of references that do not, speculate why authors would use brittle URIs when persistent ones are available, and propose an approach to alleviate the problem.

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