Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

"Ebook Pricing Hikes Amount to Price-Gouging"

Posted in Licenses, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on June 2nd, 2014

Boston Library Consortium has released "Ebook Pricing Hikes Amount to Price-Gouging" as a letter to the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Here's an excerpt:

Consequently, the BLC will lower the price ceiling below which individual titles are eligible to be included in our ebook program, we will reduce the availability of back-list titles at high price points, and we will increase the portion of our consortial budget that is allocated to those publishers whose pricing remains reasonable. In this way, we mean to reward what we regard as fair dealing, as we attempt to limit the budget impact of what appears plainly to be price-gouging.

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    De Gruyter Releases Its Books in ePub3 Format

    Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Books on May 30th, 2014

    De Gruyter has released its frontlist titles in the ePub3 format.

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    The ePub format supports variable font sizes as well as the dynamic adjustment of content to the device's screen size. EBooks in the ePub format are released as a single file, as opposed to the one-file-per-chapter format of PDF-based eBooks. De Gruyter is one of the first academic presses worldwide to offer customers the choice between the ePub and PDF formats when purchasing an eBook.

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      Big Deals: Beyond the Damage: Circulation, Coverage and Staffing

      Posted in Licenses, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on May 29th, 2014

      Walt Crawford has published Beyond the Damage: Circulation, Coverage and Staffing.

      Here's an excerpt from chapter one:

      Big-Deal Serials Purchasing: Tracking the Damage looks almost entirely at four aspects of library spending and changes in that spending: total spending, current serials, "books" (all other acquisitions) and the remainder”what's left over for staff, automation, preservation, etc.

      This book looks at some other aspects of academic libraries and how they have changed from 2002 through 2012: circulation, coverage and staffing. It's designed to complement the LTR report. Indeed, I assume that readers will have access to the report, as it includes details on which academic libraries are included and excluded. This book uses exactly the same universe of libraries (2,594 in all) as the report. I believe this book (and the supplementary PDF) will provide useful additional insights into what's happened in academic libraries over a decade in which Big Deals supposedly improved serials pricing problems”but still had serials spending taking more and more of a sometimes-shrinking overall pie…

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        "Teaching an Old University Press Publisher New Tricks: Living in the Present and Preparing for the Future of Scholarly Communications"

        Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Metrics, University Presses on May 28th, 2014

        Patrick H. Alexander has published "Teaching an Old University Press Publisher New Tricks: Living in the Present and Preparing for the Future of Scholarly Communications" in the Journal of Electronic Publishing.

        Here's an excerpt:

        University presses currently exist in the dual worlds of print and digital publishing. Current staffing needs require that they hire personnel with skills and experience that mirror that present duality. Training and maintaining a skilled workforce requires a commitment to flexibility and an openness to the ever-changing nature of scholarly communication. As the scholarly publishing ecosystem continues to evolve, university presses will need to look to a future workforce that has additional training, knowledge, and experience beyond the traditional skills associated with academic publishing, one that fully embraces the realities of a digital world, the habits of new generations of researchers, and the increasing role of technology in scholarly communication. This article looks at what the future might look like, what skills might be required, and how one might prepare for that future.

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          Learned Society Attitudes towards Open Access: Report on Survey Results

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 28th, 2014

          EDP Open has released Learned Society Attitudes towards Open Access: Report on Survey Results.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          Key findings include:

          • Learned societies overwhelmingly agree that Open Access will inevitably place some learned societies' journals into financial jeopardy.
          • Competing with large Open Access specialist publishers was also considered a significant challenge for learned societies.
          • Gold Open Access is the Open Access method that is least offered by learned society journals, however nearly two-thirds of learned societies indicated that they would like to be offering this option.
          • More than ever before, with so many journals being published Open Access of dubious origin, learned societies should look to endorse content with a stamp of quality and authority.
          • Collaboration between learned societies could help in the transition to Open Access, by pooling resources and sharing complex tasks.
          • Two-thirds of all learned societies are also looking for support on best approach to OA, and compliance with funder mandates.

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            Open Access: Markup of Innovation, Research, Science, and Technology Act Reduces Embargo Period

            Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing on May 26th, 2014

            The House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology has marked up the Frontiers in Innovation, Research, Science and Technology Act (FIRST Act), significantly reducing the embargo period for making works open access.

            Here's an excerpt from "FIRST Act Amended to Make Open Access Provision Actually Pretty Good":

            Calling this [Section 303 in the prior version of the bill] a "public access" section is a charitable reading: it extended embargo periods to up to three years, it allowed for simple linking to articles rather than the creation of an archive, and it delayed implementation unnecessarily long. (We've ranted about this bill time and again.)

            But a glimmer of hope appeared at yesterday's markup. Reps. Jim Sensenbrenner and Zoe Lofgren, introduced an amendment that radically changed Section 303. The new amendment [pdf] maps closely onto Sensenbrenner's Public Access to Public Science Act (H.R. 3157). It sets the embargo period at 12 months (like the NIH's current policy), though it allows stakeholders to extend this by 6 months if they can show a "substantial and unique harm." The amendment was also designed to facilitate long-term preservation, broad analysis of works, and closer investigation of broad copyright licenses. The current version is not perfect, but it is much improved—huge kudos to Sensenbrenner and Lofgren for standing up for open access.

            Read more about it at "Revised FIRST Bill Would Give Science Agencies 1 Year to Make Papers Free."

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              Canadian Researchers’ Publishing Attitudes and Behaviours

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers on May 16th, 2014

              Canadian Science Publishing has released Canadian Researchers' Publishing Attitudes and Behaviours.

              Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

              Some key findings described in the report:

              • Researchers agree with principle, not cost, of open access (OA)
              • Almost half of the researchers reported publishing more than half of their research in open access format in past 2 years, yet availability of open access was 8 times less important than impact factor and 13 times less important than journal reputation when selecting a journal
              • For those who have published OA, institutions and tri-agency funding typically cover cost, yet many researchers indicated they did not know whether Canada's major funding bodies support OA
              • Peer review, reach, and discoverability are considered most important journal features
              • Use of repositories differs widely across disciplines
              • Laboratory/institutional blogs or websites and social media are increasingly being used for research dissemination

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                "The Embargoes Don’t Work: The British Academy Provides the Best Evidence Yet"

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on May 15th, 2014

                Cameron Neylon has "The Embargoes Don't Work: The British Academy Provides the Best Evidence Yet" in PLOS Opens.

                Here's an excerpt:

                Embargoes are an artificial monopoly created to make the competition a bit less fierce. But truly, if a publisher believes that they add value and wants to be competitive then why should they fear a Word doc sitting on the web? Indeed if they do it suggests a lack of confidence in the additional value that they offer in the version of record. The best way to give yourself that confidence is to be tough on yourself and take a good look at how and where you add value. And the best way to do that is to compete successfully with "free."

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