Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

DOAJ and e-Depot to Preserve Open Access Journals

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 2nd, 2009

With support from the Swedish Library Association, the Directory of Open Access Journals and the e-Depot of the National Library of the Netherlands will preserve open access journals.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

Long-term preservation of scholarly publications is of major importance for the research community. New formats of scholarly publications, new business models and new ways of dissemination are constantly being developed. To secure permanent access to scientific output for the future, focussed on the preservation of articles published in open access journals, a cooperation between Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ—www.doaj.org), developed and operated by Lund University Libraries and the e-Depot of the National Library of the Netherlands (www.kb.nl/e-Depot) has been initiated.

The composition of the DOAJ collection (currently 4000 journals) is characterized by a very large number of publishers (2.000+), each publishing a very small number of journals on different platforms, in different formats and in more than 50 different languages. Many of these publishers are—with a number of exceptions—fragile when it comes to financial, technical and administrative sustainability.

At present DOAJ and KB carry out a pilot project aimed at setting up a workflow for processing open access journals listed with DOAJ. In the pilot a limited number of open access journals will be subject to long term preservation. These activities will be scaled up shortly and long term archiving of the journals listed in the DOAJ at KB’s e-Depot will become an integral part of the service provided by the DOAJ.

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    U.S. 2008 Book Sales: $24.3 Billion, Down 2.8%

    Posted in Publishing on April 2nd, 2009

    The Association of American Publishers has released 2008 book sales figures for the U.S. Sales totaled $24.3 billion, down 2.8% from 2007.

    Here's an excerpt from the press release:

    Trade sales of adult and juvenile books fell 5.2 percent from 2007 to $8.1 billion, CAGR fell to 2.1 percent. Growth was found in paperbound books for children and adults, with growth rates of 6.4% and 3.6% respectively. Sales in the hardcover fell 12.4% in children's hardcover and 13% in adult hardcover. . . .

    Educational titles had a mixed year. Sales in the Elementary (El-Hi) category, those books produced for K-12 education, fell 4.4% to $6.1 billion in 2008, CAGR for this category was 0.8%. The Higher Education category, which includes sales of college textbooks, fared better. Total sales reached $3.8 billion this year up 2.7% on 2007. This brought the CAGR for college textbooks to 3.8%. . . .

    Audio book sales for 2008 totaled $172 million, down 21% on the prior year, CAGR for this category is still healthy at 3.1%. E-books continue to grow significantly, sales reached $113 million in 2008, up 68.4%

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      Faced with 20% Sales Drop, University of New Mexico Press Cuts Jobs and May Outsource More

      Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Books, University Presses on April 1st, 2009

      In "U of New Mexico Press Downsizes," Rachel Deahl reports that the University of New Mexico Press is cutting jobs, and it may outsource warehouse/customer service operations to cope with a 20% sales decline.

      Read more about it at “Most. Revealing. Press Release. Ever“; “UNM Press Announces Reorganization“; and “UNM Press to Fire Three Employees.”

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        Estimated 10% Sales Drop at Harvard University Press

        Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Books, University Presses on April 1st, 2009

        According to “Harvard Press Sales Down,” Mary Kate Maco, Publicity Director at Harvard University Press, believes that sales at the press may have “declined similarly to the national average of 10 percent calculated by the American Association of University Presses.”

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          Paying for Open Access Publication Charges: Guidance for Higher Education and Research Institutions, Publishers and Authors

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 31st, 2009

          The Research Information Network has released Paying for Open Access Publication Charges: Guidance for Higher Education and Research Institutions, Publishers and Authors

          Here's an excerpt:

          This document provides advice and guidance on the arrangements for paying open access publication fees: that is, fees levied by some journals for the publication of scholarly articles so that they can be made available free of charge to readers, immediately upon publication. The guidance is directed to UK HEIs and other research institutions, to research funders, to publishers, and to authors. It is the practical outcome from a working group established by UUK and the RIN. It presents the advice from representatives of the library, publishing and research administrator communities on the practical issues to be addressed in establishing coordinated and strategic approaches to the payment of publication fees.

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            RIN Briefing Note: Scholarly Books and Journals at Risk: Responding to the Challenges of a Changing Economy

            Posted in Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on March 31st, 2009

            The Research Information Network has released Scholarly Books and Journals at Risk: Responding to the Challenges of a Changing Economy

            Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

            The current economic difficulties across the globe bring serious risks to scholarly books and journals. In the UK, the recent dramatic fall in the value of sterling has seriously damaged university library purchasing budgets.

            This briefing note aims to inform and motivate all key stakeholders—universities, funding bodies, researchers, librarians, and publishers—to work together to find creative, practical and sustainable solutions to this serious (and unforeseen) challenge to the vitality of the UK’s research base.

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              University Presses Face Hard Times, University of Michigan Press Goes Digital

              Posted in Publishing, University Presses on March 29th, 2009

              As university presses struggle with increasing financial challenges, the University of Michigan Press is merging with the University Library and it will emphasize an innovative new model of digital monograph publication.

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                Open Access Publishing in European Networks Launches Newsletter

                Posted in E-Books, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books, University Presses on March 28th, 2009

                OAPEN (Open Access Publishing in European Networks) has launched a newsletter, sending the first issue out as a message on the SPARC-OAForum list.

                Here's an excerpt:

                First meeting of the Scientific Board

                The OAPEN project has installed two external bodies (External stakeholder Group and Scientific Board) to ensure that the needs of scholars, publishers, funders and universities are met by the project's findings and developments. The Scientific Board of OAPEN consists of several international renowned scholars known for their expertise in publishing. Among them are scholars promoting Open Access such as Jean Claude Guédon (University of Montreal) or Gerhard Lauer (University of Göttingen), publishers and editors making electronic publishing come true like Charles Henry (Rice University Press) or Siggi Jöttkandt (Open Humanities Press), but also representatives from funders and university associations like Sarah Porter (JISC) and Sijbolt Noorda (EUA).

                The first meeting constituted the Scientific Board as an active part of OAPEN. The board members will serve as a consulting and inspiring body for OAPEN during the funding period and hopefully beyond. Conclusions from the first board meeting were for instance to account for widespread conservative publishing attitudes among HSS scholars and at the same time the need to promote new modes of publishing such as more fluid media forms. The board members emphasised the importance of publisher-organised quality control and Open Access experiments for the mentioned fields and encouraged the project partners to conduct OAPEN as planned

                .

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                  Wolters Kluwer 2008 Annual Report Available

                  Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 20th, 2009

                  Wolters Kluwer's 2008 Annual Report is now available.

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                    Transcript of Reed Elsevier Group’s 2008 Earnings Call

                    Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 20th, 2009

                    Seeking Alpha has published a transcript of the Reed Elsevier Group's 2008 earnings call.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    [Sir Crispin Davis] Turning now to the individual businesses, Elsevier had a good year, good overall results and the internals I think are genuinely encouraging. Renewals went up again to 98%, and if you think about this, this is extraordinary, that among our 6000 customers across over 150 countries in the word that we can get 98% renewal rate in these times.

                    Usage rose up again well about to 20% in terms of actual downloads, average subscription contract more that 3 years, and the present round of renewals is going very well. For example, one of our more challenging clients, California Digital Library, we signed a five-year contract with them recently. . . .

                    Again, underlying this is a lot of encouraging data in terms of the quality of our content and publications. The last two years we've seen citation rates rise up. We've seen impact factors rise up. For example, Sale this year for the first time overtook Nature and Science in terms of impact factors. Article submissions were up 4% to 5%, usage up over 20%, renewals running at a very high rate. So, as well as the sort of financial performance numbers, I think the underlying performance metrics in Elsevier both on science and health look strong.

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                      “‘Publishers Did Not Take the Bait': A Forgotten Precursor to the NIH Public Access Policy”

                      Posted in Author Rights, Copyright, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on March 19th, 2009

                      Jonathan Miller has published "'Publishers Did Not Take the Bait': A Forgotten Precursor to the NIH Public Access Policy" in the latest issue of College & Research Libraries (access is restricted under the journal's embargo policy).

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      This article compares the recent National Institutes of Health (NIH) Public Access Policy (2005-07) with the United States Office of Education policy on copyright in funded research (1965-70). The two policies and the differing technological and political contexts of the periods are compared and contrasted. The author concludes that a more nuanced approach to copyright, the digital information environment, and the support of an energized user community auger well for the success of the NIH policy, but that it is still too soon to tell.

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                        Humanities Book Publishing Crisis: Professors on the Production Line, Students on Their Own

                        Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Communication on March 18th, 2009

                        The American Enterprise Institute has released Professors on the Production Line, Students on Their Own by Mark Bauerlein.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        Mark Bauerlein, a professor of English at Emory University and former director of the Office of Research and Analysis at the National Endowment for the Arts, examines the pressure on humanities professors to "publish publish publish" and explains why the abundance of research offers diminishing returns. He laments the consequences for undergraduate education and student engagement and suggests that students, faculty, and the broader society would be well-served if we revisited this aged and problematic compact. . . .

                        Read more about it at "Unread Monographs, Uninspired Undergrads."

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