Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

"No Scholar Is an Island: The Impact of Sharing in the Work Life of Scholars"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 13th, 2017

Carol Tenopir et al. have published "No Scholar Is an Island: The Impact of Sharing in the Work Life of Scholars" in .

Here's an excerpt:

In an international survey of 1,000 published scholars, the Beyond Downloads project examined their sharing behaviours in order to gain a more contextualized and accurate picture of their usage beyond download patterns and citation counts. Scholars share published articles with others as a mode of content discovery and dissemination, particularly if they work in groups, and most expect to increase their sharing in the future.

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"What Does ‘Green’ Open Access Mean? Tracking Twelve Years of Changes to Journal Publisher Self-Archiving Policies"

Posted in E-Prints, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on February 13th, 2017

Elizabeth Gadd and Denise Troll Covey have self-archived "What Does 'Green' Open Access Mean? Tracking Twelve Years of Changes to Journal Publisher Self-Archiving Policies."

Here's an excerpt:

Traces the 12-year self-archiving policy journey of the original 107 publishers listed on the SHERPA/RoMEO Publisher Policy Database in 2004, through to 2015. Maps the RoMEO colour codes 'green', 'blue', 'yellow' and 'white') and related restrictions and conditions over time. Finds that while the volume of publishers allowing some form of self-archiving (pre-print, post-print or both) has increased by 12% over the twelve years, the volume of restrictions around how, where, and when self-archiving may take place has increased 119%, 190% and 1000% respectively.

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How Americans Encounter, Recall and Act Upon Digital News

Posted in Digital Culture, Publishing on February 10th, 2017

The Pew Research Center has released How Americans Encounter, Recall and Act Upon Digital News.

Here's an excerpt:

When asked how they arrived at news content in their most recent web interaction, online news consumers were about equally likely to get news by going directly to a news website (36% of the times they got news, on average) as getting it through social media (35%). They were less likely to access news through emails, text messages or search engines. . . .

Among the five pathways studied, news instances spurred by emails and texts from friends or family elicited the most activity; nearly three-quarters (73%) of these instances were acted upon in some way. That outpaced even social media and direct visits to a news organization’s website, where a follow-up action occurred in about half of news instances (53% and 47%, respectively).

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"Updating the Agenda for Academic Libraries and Scholarly Communications"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on February 9th, 2017

Clifford Lynch has published "Updating the Agenda for Academic Libraries and Scholarly Communications" in College & Research Libraries.

Here's an excerpt:

This issue of C&RL is focused on scholarly communication, and it seems appropriate, in this invited guest editorial, to step back and examine the broader agenda that academic and research libraries need to consider today in engaging with scholarly communications as a way of framing the issue. My view is that this agenda is ripe for re-thinking. The overall environment has changed significantly in the last few years, underscoring the growing irrelevance of some long-held ideas, and at the same time, clearly identifying new and urgent priorities. What I hope to do here is to summarize very succinctly my thoughts on the most pressing issues and the areas most needing reconsideration. Articles in this issue touch upon aspects of many of these topics; I hope that future authors may also find topical inspirations here.

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"An Empirical Study of Law Journal Copyright Practices"

Posted in Copyright, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 9th, 2017

Brian L. Frye, Christopher J. Ryan, Jr., and Franklin L. Runge have published "An Empirical Study of Law Journal Copyright Practices" in the Review of Intellectual Property Law.

Here's an excerpt:

This article presents an empirical study of the copyright practices of American law journals in relation to copyright ownership and fair use, based on a 24-question survey. It concludes that many American law journals have adopted copyright policies that are inconsistent with the expectations of legal scholars and the scope of copyright protection. Specifically, many law journals have adopted copyright policies that effectively preclude open-access publishing, and unnecessarily limit the fair use of copyrighted works. In addition, it appears that some law journals may not understand their own copyright policies. This article proposes the creation of a Code of Copyright Best Practices for Law Journals in order to encourage both open-access publishing and fair use.

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"E-Data Quality: How Publishers and Libraries are Working Together to Improve Data Quality"

Posted in Electronic Resources, Metadata, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on February 7th, 2017

Carlen Ruschoff et al. have published "Data Quality: How Publishers and Libraries are Working Together to Improve Data Quality " in Collaborative librarianship.

Here's an excerpt:

High quality data is essential for discovery and access of e-resources, but in many cases low quality, inaccurate information leads to low usage and a poor return on library investment dollars. In this article, publishers, aggregators, librarians, and knowledge base providers talk about how they are working together to improve access to e-resources.

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"Pay What You Want as a Pricing Model for Open Access Publishing?"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 6th, 2017

Lucas Stich. Martin Spann. and Klaus M. Schmidt have self-archived "Pay What You Want as a Pricing Model for Open Access Publishing?"

Here's an excerpt:

We analyze "Pay What You Want" as a business model for Open Access publishing by discussing motives leading authors to make voluntary contributions, potential benefits for publishers and present results from a field experiment at one publisher. Data from the field experiment indicate authors’ willingness to voluntarily contribute.

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Moving Open Access Implementation Forward: A Handbook for Open Access Good Practice Based on Experiences of UK Higher Education Institutions

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Self-Archiving on February 3rd, 2017

Jisc has released Moving Open Access Implementation Forward: A Handbook for Open Access Good Practice Based on Experiences of UK Higher Education Institutions .

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Following the completion of the Open Access Good Practice (OAGP) initiative, we have produced a new handbook based on the experiences of the nine pathfinder projects. It is aimed at staff involved in supporting open access implementation at institutions in the UK.OAGP Handbook Cover

The handbook summarises the lessons learned by the projects and points towards key tools and resources.

See also: OA Good Practice Initiative: Final Project Report.

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PLOS: Response to NIH RFI—Strategies for NIH Data Management, Sharing, and Citation

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing on January 31st, 2017

PLOS has released Response to NIH RFI—Strategies for NIH Data Management, Sharing, and Citation.

Here's an excerpt:

We write to express the views of the Public Library of Science, a fully Open Access Publisher of seven Research Journals, in response to your RFI on Data Sharing, Management, and Citation. Open access to Research Articles is just the first step in what we consider should be the end state for all publicly funded research, and we support broader efforts towards open science. We are developing our own policies to help establish a new norm in which upon publication of a journal article, if not before, all of the underlying data (where ethically appropriate) is openly available to access and reuse without restriction according to the FAIR principles for data management to make data Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Re-usable.

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"Novel Processes and Metrics for a Scientific Evaluation Rooted in the Principles of Science—Version 1"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on January 31st, 2017

Michaël Bon, Michael Taylor, and Gary S. McDowell have self-archived "Novel Processes and Metrics for a Scientific Evaluation Rooted in the Principles of Science—Version 1."

Here's an excerpt:

Scientific evaluation is a determinant of how scientists, institutions and funders behave, and as such is a key element in the making of science. In this article, we propose an alternative to the current norm of evaluating research with journal rank. Following a well-defined notion of scientific value, we introduce qualitative processes that can also be quantified and give rise to meaningful and easy-to-use article-level metrics. In our approach, the goal of a scientist is transformed from convincing an editorial board through a vertical process to convincing peers through an horizontal one. We argue that such an evaluation system naturally provides the incentives and logic needed to constantly promote quality, reproducibility, openness and collaboration in science. The system is legally and technically feasible and can gradually lead to the self-organized reappropriation of the scientific process by the scholarly community and its institutions. We propose an implementation of our evaluation system with the platform "the Self-Journals of Science" (www.sjscience.org).

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"Out of Print: The Orphans of Mass Digitization"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Mass Digitizaton, Public Domain, Publishing on January 30th, 2017

Mary Murrell has published "Out of Print: The Orphans of Mass Digitization" in Current Anthropology.

Here's an excerpt:

In the 2000s an interconnected set of elite projects in the United States sought to digitize "all books in all languages" and make them available online. These mass digitization projects were efforts to absorb the print book infrastructure into a new one centered in computer networks. Mass book digitization has now faded from view, and here I trace its setbacks through a curious figure—the "orphan"—that emerged from within these projects and acted ultimately as an agent of impasse. In legal policy debates, an "orphan" refers to a copyrighted work whose owner cannot be found, but its history, range of meanings, and deployments reveal it to be considerably more complex. Based on fieldwork conducted at a digital library engaged in mass digitization, this paper analyzes the "orphan" as a personifying metaphor that digital library activists embraced in order to challenge and/or disrupt the social relations that adhere in and around books.

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"CDL Model License Revised"

Posted in Licenses, Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on January 27th, 2017

The California Digital Library has released "CDL Model License Revised."

Here's an excerpt:

CDL is pleased to announce the major upgrade of its Standard License Agreement (“Model License”). The new version reflects current best practices in licensing and incorporates feedback from UC librarians, licensing staff, attorneys, peers, and CDL colleagues. We appreciate all of their contributions, and hope that the new Model License is helpful in negotiating effectively with licensors. . . .

The new Model License is available on the CDL Website. There are two versions: a UC staff version (password protected) and a public version.

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