Archive for the 'Reports and White Papers' Category

How Teens Do Research in the Digital World

Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers on November 5th, 2012

The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released How Teens Do Research in the Digital World.

Here's an excerpt:

  • Virtually all (99%) AP and NWP teachers in this study agree with the notion that "the internet enables students to access a wider range of resources than would otherwise be available," and 65% agree that "the internet makes today's students more self-sufficient researchers."
  • At the same time, 76% of teachers surveyed "strongly agree" with the assertion that internet search engines have conditioned students to expect to be able to find information quickly and easily.
  • Large majorities also agree with the notion that the amount of information available online today is overwhelming to most students (83%) and that today's digital technologies discourage students from using a wide range of sources when conducting research (71%).
  • Fewer teachers, but still a majority of this sample (60%), agree with the assertion that today's technologies make it harder for students to find credible sources of information.

| Reviews of Digital Scholarship Publications | Digital Scholarship |

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    Report of the ARL Joint Task Force on Services to Patrons with Print Disabilities

    Posted in ARL Libraries, Electronic Resources, Legislation and Government Regulation, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries on November 5th, 2012

    The Association of Research Libraries has released the Report of the ARL Joint Task Force on Services to Patrons with Print Disabilities.

    Here's an excerpt from:

    This ARL task force report highlights emerging and promising strategies to better align research libraries with other institutional and related partners in ensuring accessibility to research resources while fully meeting legal requirements. The report addresses the technological, service, and legal factors relating to a variety of information resources with respect to print disability. These factors resonate closely with the existing research library agenda to make scholarly communication more open, to foster independence among its user base by teaching information literacy, to honor and invest in diversity, as well as to focus on the growing trend toward universal design in instruction.

    | Digital Scholarship's Digital/Print Books | Digital Scholarship |

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      E-books: Developments and Policy Considerations

      Posted in Copyright, E-Books, Licenses, Publishing, Reports and White Papers on November 1st, 2012

      The OECD has released E-books: Developments and Policy Considerations.

      Here's an excerpt:

      The essential distinction between permanent and effective ownership of a physical book, and conditional rights of access to the e-book, has, so far, been somewhat obscured by marketing strategies and use of visual images, which tend to present e-books as a superior, but also substitutable, version of the print book product. Given the virtual reality of "traditional books" presented by e-Book platforms, buyers of e-books are likely to confuse their rights (i.e. after purchase) with the property rights model for print books. Users may be surprised to find that they are prevented from doing certain things7 with their e-book, within their private/ personal sphere.

      | Reviews of Digital Scholarship Publications | Digital Scholarship |

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        Measuring the Impact of Digital Resources: The Balanced Value Impact Model

        Posted in Digital Humanities, Digital Libraries, Electronic Resources, Reports and White Papers on October 31st, 2012

        King's College London has released Measuring the Impact of Digital Resources: The Balanced Value Impact Model.

        Here's an excerpt:

        This document synthesizes information from the whole Impact Assessment sector and then proposes the Balanced Value Impact Model as a means to effectively carry out an Impact Assessment relating to the benefits of digitization and digital resources in general. It seeks to help the communities identified above to provide a compelling argument for future work. Thus, you will find in this document information on:

        • Where the value and impact can be found in digital resources,
        • Who are the beneficiaries gaining from the impact and value,
        • How to measure change and impact for digital resources,
        • What makes for good indicators of change in people’s lives,
        • How to do an Impact Assessment using the Balanced Value Impact Model, and
        • How to present a convincing evidence-based argument for digital resources?

        | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

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          UNT Libraries: Open Access Fund Research Report

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries on October 30th, 2012

          The University of North Texas Libraries have released the UNT Libraries: Open Access Fund Research Report.

          Here's the abstract:

          This report discusses Open Access (OA) funds created at universities in order to assist faculty authors with Article Processing Charges (APCs). Building on the research initiatives of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), thirty North American universities' OA fund initiatives were reviewed on their sponsors, eligibility, reimbursement criteria, and stipulations related to the fund. In addition, fifteen OA journal funding models and twelve hybrid journal funding models were reviewed on their average APCs and their licensing policies. This report serves as a framework for building upon emerging best practices and outlining possible approaches and considerations for the University of North Texas.

          | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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            Curating for Quality: Ensuring Data Quality to Enable New Science

            Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Reports and White Papers on October 30th, 2012

            The UNC School of Information & Library Science has released Curating for Quality: Ensuring Data Quality to Enable New Science.

            Here's an excerpt:

            The National Science Foundation sponsored a workshop on September 10 and 11, 2012, in Arlington, Virginia on "Curating for Quality: Ensuring Data Quality to Enable New Science." Individuals from government, academic and industry settings gathered to discuss issues, strategies and priorities for ensuring quality in collections of data. This workshop aimed to define data quality research issues and potential solutions. The workshop objectives were organized into four clusters: (1) data quality criteria and contexts, (2) human and institutional factors, (3) tools for effective and painless curation, and (4) metrics for data quality. . . .

            The workshop identified several key challenges that include:

            • selection strategies—how to determine what is most valuable to preserve
            • how much and which context to include—how to insure that data is interpretable and usable in the future, what metadata to include
            • tools and techniques to support painless curation—creating and sharing tools and techniques that apply across disciplines
            • cost and accountability models—how to balance selection, context decisions with cost constraints.

            | Digital Curation Bibliography: Preservation and Stewardship of Scholarly Works | Digital Scholarship |

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              The Current State of Open Access Repository Interoperability

              Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Reports and White Papers on October 25th, 2012

              The Confederation of Open Access Repositories has released The Current State of Open Access Repository Interoperability.

              Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

              The report provides an overview of the current interoperability landscape in terms of the types of services that are now possible because of recent research and development efforts from throughout the Open Access community. The report covers seven areas of focus for current interoperability initiatives, and it provides overviews of nineteen key interoperability initiatives.

              The intended audience includes institutions and repository managers operating at different points in terms of infrastructure, resources, and institutional support. For institutions new to Open Access and repositories, the report aims to provide guidance for getting started and indicates which interoperability initiatives are necessary to implement in order to achieve specific services. For institutions and repository managers already involved in OA and repositories, the report may provide ideas for additional functionality to add to your repository or further services that are possible to provide to your community.

              | Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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                OAPEN-UK HSS Researcher Survey Results

                Posted in E-Books, Open Access, Reports and White Papers on October 24th, 2012

                The OAPEN-UK project has released the OAPEN-UK HSS Researcher Survey Results.

                Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                Here are some of the highlights:

                • Only 50% of researchers are aware of OA and only 30% familiar with it.
                • Around 50% of researchers think it is ok to make a profit from OA publishing as long as that profit goes back into supporting the discipline or making more OA content available — 20% think you can make a profit and use it however you like and 20% think that you can make a profit but only to cover costs.
                • Almost 80% would prefer the most restrictive Creative Comms licence, but what is interesting is that the responses show that researchers are more concerned about protecting their work than it being used commercially.
                • 60% had read a monograph in the last couple of days â 39% had bought it and 33% had got it via the library
                • Early career academics are more willing to consider self-publishing than later career researchers.

                | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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                  Younger Americans’ Reading and Library Habits

                  Posted in Digital Culture, Libraries, Reports and White Papers on October 23rd, 2012

                  The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released Younger Americans' Reading and Library Habits.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  Among the main findings:

                  • 83% of Americans between the ages of 16 and 29 read a book in the past year. Some 75% read a print book, 19% read an e-book, and 11% listened to an audiobook.
                  • Among Americans who read e-books, those under age 30 are more likely to read their e-books on a cell phone (41%) or computer (55%) than on an e-book reader such as a Kindle (23%) or tablet (16%).
                  • Overall, 47% of younger Americans read long-form e-content such as books, magazines or newspapers. E-content readers under age 30 are more likely than older e-content readers to say that they are reading more these days due to the availability of e-content (40% vs. 28%).

                  | Digital Scholarship's Digital/Print Books | Digital Scholarship |

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                    Fit for Purpose: Developing Business Cases for New Services in Research Libraries

                    Posted in Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries on October 18th, 2012

                    The Council on Library and Information Resources has released Fit for Purpose: Developing Business Cases for New Services in Research Libraries.

                    Here's an excerpt from the press release:

                    Sponsored by the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) and the Digital Library Federation (DLF) program, Fit for Purpose presents a set of recommendations that libraries can adopt when developing any new service. The report attends closely to entrepreneurial activities such as library-based publishing and data stewardship because of the uncertainty and complexity of those services. . . .

                    Fit for Purpose provides a decision-making toolbox created from elements of social entrepreneurship and project management that are consistent with research library environments and values. It addresses organizational readiness and risk tolerance, business case development, piloting new services, and monitoring sustainability through the business planning lifecycle. The team is also conducting several case studies to explore how libraries have conducted business planning to support their new ventures. These will be published at a future date, followed by a concluding report that reassesses the initial recommendations.

                    | Reviews of Digital Scholarship Publications | Digital Scholarship |

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                      Patron-Driven Acquisitions: PDA and the University Press

                      Posted in Publishing, Reports and White Papers, University Presses on October 16th, 2012

                      Joseph J. Esposito has released PDA and the University Press.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      Patron-driven acquisitions (PDA) is a method by which libraries acquire books that delays purchase until the moment of first use. The aim of this report is to provide guidance to publishers, especially university presses, as to how to offset any sales losses from PDA and, through a tighter weaving of publishers' and libraries' interests, even identify means to augment sales and to improve the service that libraries provide for their constituencies.

                      | Digital Scholarship's Digital/Print Books | Digital Scholarship |

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                        Learning Curve: How College Graduates Solve Information Problems Once They Join the Workplace

                        Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers on October 15th, 2012

                        Project Information Literacy has released Learning Curve: How College Graduates Solve Information Problems Once They Join the Workplace.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        Most graduates in our focus groups said they found it difficult to solve information problems in the workplace, where unlike college, a sense of urgency pervaded and where personal contacts often reaped more useful results than online searches. Graduates said they leveraged essential information competencies from college for extracting content and also developed adaptive information-seeking strategies for reaching out to trusted colleagues in order to compensate for what they lacked. At the same time, employers said they recruited graduates, in part, for their online searching skills but still expected and needed more traditional research competencies, such as thumbing through bound reports, picking up the telephone, and interpreting research results with team members. They found that their college hires rarely demonstrated these competencies. Overall, our findings suggest there is a distinct difference between today's graduates who demonstrated how quickly they found answers online and seasoned employers who needed college hires to use a combination of online and traditional methods to conduct comprehensive research.

                        | Digital Scholarship's Digital/Print Books | Digital Scholarship |

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