Archive for the 'Reports and White Papers' Category

The Value and Benefits of Text Mining

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Reports and White Papers on March 14th, 2012

JIASC has released The Value and Benefits of Text Mining.

Here's an excerpt:

Vast amounts of new information and data are generated everyday through economic, academic and social activities. This sea of data, predicted to increase at a rate of 40% p.a., has significant potential economic and societal value. Techniques such as text and data mining and analytics are required to exploit this potential. . . .

To date there has been no systematic analysis of the value and benefits of text mining to UK further and higher education (UKFHE), nor of the additional value and benefits that might result from the exceptions to copyright proposed by Hargreaves. JISC thus commissioned this analysis of 'The Value and Benefits of Text Mining to UK Further and Higher Education'.

We have explored the costs, benefits, barriers and risks associated with text mining within UKFHE research using the approach to welfare economics laid out in the UK Treasury best practice guidelines for evaluation [2]. We gathered our evidence from consultations with key stakeholders and a set of case studies.

| Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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    Search Engine Use 2012

    Posted in Digital Culture, Google and Other Search Engines, Reports and White Papers on March 11th, 2012

    The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released Search Engine Use 2012.

    Here's an excerpt:

    For more than a decade, Pew Internet data has consistently shown that search engine use is one of the most popular online activities, rivaled only by email as an internet pursuit. In January 2002, 52% of all Americans used search engines. In February 2012 that figure grew to 73% of all Americans. On any given day in early 2012, more than half of adults using the internet use a search engine (59%). That is double the 30% of internet users who were using search engines on a typical day in 2004. And people's frequency of using search engines has jumped dramatically.

    | Google Books Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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      Review of Data Management Lifecycle Models

      Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Reports and White Papers on February 21st, 2012

      Alex Ball has self-archived Review of Data Management Lifecycle Models in the University of Bath institutional repository.

      Here's an excerpt:

      The importance of lifecycle models is that they provide a structure for considering the many operations that will need to be performed on a data record throughout its life. Many curatorial actions can be made considerably easier if they have been prepared for in advance – even at or before the point of record creation. For example, a repository can be more certain of the preservation actions it can perform if the rights and licensing status of the data has already been clarified, and researchers are more likely to be able to detail the methodologies and workflows they used if they record them at the time.

      | Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

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        Google Digital Humanities Awards Recipient Interviews Report

        Posted in Digital Humanities, Reports and White Papers on February 20th, 2012

        Virgil E.Varvel, Jr. and Andrea Thomer have self-archived the Google Digital Humanities Awards Recipient Interviews Report in IDEALS.

        Here's an excerpt:

        As input into the development, design, and improvement of the HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC), recipients of Google's Digital Humanities Grants were interviewed to identify issues encountered during their projects. This project was guided by the following goals:

        • Increase empirical understanding of how to identify materials for use by scholars.
        • Increase empirical understanding of how to provide better access to materials for use by scholars.
        • Identify meaningful characteristics of content that affect identification, retrieval, and other parameters.
        • Identify data preprocessing and transformation issues encountered by scholars.
        • Provide input to inform the architecture of the HTRC related to representation of collections, faceted browsing, identifiers, etc.

        |Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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          Preserving Email

          Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Reports and White Papers on February 19th, 2012

          The Digital Preservation Coalition has released Preserving Email.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          Gareth Knight of King's College London welcomed the report. 'Preserving Email provides an excellent overview of the topic, drawing together observations made in a number of research projects to provide a succinct overview of the legal, technical, and cultural issues that must be addressed to ensure that these digital assets can be curated and preserved in the long-term. Its conclusion, providing a set of pragmatic, easy-to-understand recommendations that individuals and institutions may apply to better manage their email archive, highlights the complexity of email preservation. It also sends a clear message that it is something that everyone can perform.'

          | Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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            Users, Narcissism and Control—Tracking the Impact of Scholarly Publications in the 21st Century

            Posted in Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Communication on February 13th, 2012

            The SURFfoundation has released Users, Narcissism and Control—Tracking the Impact of Scholarly Publications in the 21st Century.

            Here's an excerpt:

            This report explores the explosion of tracking tools that have accompanied the surge of web based information instruments. Is it possible to monitor 'real-time' how new research findings are being read, cited, used and transformed in practical results and applications? And what are the potential risks and disadvantages of the new tracking tools? This report aims to contribute to a better understanding of these developments by providing a detailed assessment of the currently available novel tools and methodologies. A total of 16 quite different tools are assessed.

            The report concludes that web based academic publishing is producing a variety of novel information filters. These allow the researcher to make some sort of limited self-assessment with respect to the response to his/her work. However, this does not mean that these technologies and databases can also legitimately be used in research assessments. For this application, they need to adhere to a far stricter protocol of data quality and indicator reliability and validity. Most new tools do not (yet) comply with these more strict quality criteria.

            | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

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              The Future of Taxpayer-Funded Research: Who Will Control Access to the Results?

              Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Reports and White Papers on February 13th, 2012

              The Committee for Economic Development has released The Future of Taxpayer-Funded Research: Who Will Control Access to the Results?.

              Here's an excerpt:

              This report builds upon that earlier work and delves deeper into the relationship between the traditional means of providing access to federally funded scientific research and the benefits that can be derived from providing greater public access to it. As with virtually any public policy, the benefits and costs of providing public access to federally funded research fall unevenly on different members of society. We find, however, that because public-access policies that make research more open result in accelerated progress in science and faster economic growth, the net societal benefits far outweigh their limited costs.

              | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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                Data-Intensive Research: Community Capability Model Framework (Consultation Draft)

                Posted in Cyberinfrastructure/E-Science, Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Reports and White Papers on February 12th, 2012

                The Community Capability Model for Data-Intensive Research project has released a consultation draft of the Community Capability Model Framework.

                Here's an excerpt:

                The Community Capability Model Framework is a tool developed by UKOLN, University of Bath, and Microsoft Research to assist institutions, research funders and researchers in growing the capability of their communities to perform data-­-intensive research by

                • profiling the current readiness or capability of the community,
                • indicating priority areas for change and investment, and
                • developing roadmaps for achieving a target state of readiness.

                The Framework is comprised of eight capability factors representing human, technical and environmental issues. Within each factor are a series of community characteristics that are relevant for determining the capability or readiness of that community to perform data- intensive research.

                | E-science and Academic Libraries Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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                  Collaborative Yet Independent: Information Practices in the Physical Sciences

                  Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Communication on February 8th, 2012

                  The Research Information Network, the Institute of Physics, Institute of Physics Publishing, and the Royal Astronomical Society have released Collaborative Yet Independent: Information Practices in the Physical Sciences.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  In many ways, the physical sciences are at the forefront of using digital tools and methods to work with information and data. However, the fields and disciplines that make up the physical sciences are by no means uniform, and physical scientists find, use, and disseminate information in a variety of ways. This report examines information practices in the physical sciences across seven cases, and demonstrates the richly varied ways in which physical scientists work, collaborate, and share information and data.

                  | Digital Bibliographies | Digital Scholarship |

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                    NMC Horizon Report: 2012 Higher Education Edition

                    Posted in Emerging Technologies, Reports and White Papers on February 6th, 2012

                    The New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative have released the NMC Horizon Report: 2012 Higher Education Edition.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    The internationally recognized NMC Horizon Report series and regional NMC Technology Outlooks are part of the NMC Horizon Project, a comprehensive research venture established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact over the coming five years in education around the globe. . . .

                    To create the report, an international body of experts in education, technology, and other fields was convened as an advisory board. The group engaged in discussions around a set of research questions intended to surface significant trends and challenges and to identify a wide array of potential technologies for the report. This dialog was enriched by a wide range of resources, current research, and practice that drew on the expertise of both the NMC community and the communities of the members of the advisory board. These interactions among the advisory board are the focus of the NMC Horizon Report research, and this report details the areas in which these experts were in strong agreement.

                    | Digital Scholarship's Digital/Print Books | Digital Scholarship |

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                      Access to Scholarly Content: Gaps and Barriers

                      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on February 5th, 2012

                      The Research Information Network has released Access to Scholarly Content: Gaps and Barriers.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      The overall aim of this study is to investigate and quantify the extent to which members of different communities in the UK can gain ready access to formally-published scholarly literature, in particular journal articles and conference proceedings. . . .

                      Much of the information presented here is based on an online survey of researchers and knowledge workers from UK universities and colleges, medical schools and health providers, industry and commerce, and research institutes. . . .

                      Other information in this report comes from a detailed analysis of the literature and secondary data analysis of the Labour Force Survey in an attempt to quantify the size of the UK professional knowledge worker sector.

                      | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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                        Making Good on the Promise of ERM: A Standards and Best Practices Discussion Paper

                        Posted in Electronic Resources, ERM/Discovery Systems, Reports and White Papers on February 2nd, 2012

                        NISO has released Making Good on the Promise of ERM: A Standards and Best Practices Discussion Paper.

                        Here's an excerpt from the press release:

                        "Our standards review and findings focused on five categories: link resolvers and knowledge bases; the work, manifestations, and access points; cost and usage-related data; license terms; and data exchange using institutional identifiers," states Tim Jewell, Director, Information Resources and Scholarly Communications, University of Washington, and Chair of the ERM Data Standards and Best Practices Review Steering Committee. "We did a more extensive review of fourteen of the most relevant standards and mapped the data elements for each to the elements defined in the ERMI report. We also looked at how ERM systems could improve their workflow support-a shortcoming in most existing systems-and we include a detailed workflow best practices bibliography and a list of illustrative workflow diagrams."

                        "Our final analysis showed that there is value to updating and maintaining a data dictionary that encompasses ERM functions and evolves with technologies and business models," maintains Ivy Anderson, Director of Collections, California Digital Library and member of the ERM Data Standards and Best Practices Review Steering Committee. "However, for practical considerations, we did not recommend that NISO pursue such a project at this time. Instead we identified a number of narrower initiatives targeting specific ERM functional needs and strategies aimed at furthering interoperability."

                        | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

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