Archive for the 'Reports and White Papers' Category

Library Linked Data Incubator Group Final Report

Posted in Linking, Linked Data, and Semantic Web, Reports and White Papers on October 25th, 2011

The W3C Incubator Group has released Library Linked Data Incubator Group Final Report.

Here's an excerpt:

Key recommendations of the report are:

  • That library leaders identify sets of data as possible candidates for early exposure as Linked Data and foster a discussion about Open Data and rights;
  • That library standards bodies increase library participation in Semantic Web standardization, develop library data standards that are compatible with Linked Data, and disseminate best-practice design patterns tailored to library Linked Data;
  • That data and systems designers design enhanced user services based on Linked Data capabilities, create URIs for the items in library datasets, develop policies for managing RDF vocabularies and their URIs, and express library data by re-using or mapping to existing Linked Data vocabularies;
  • That librarians and archivists preserve Linked Data element sets and value vocabularies and apply library experience in curation and long-term preservation to Linked Data datasets.

See also the related reports: Library Linked Data Incubator Group: Datasets, Value Vocabularies, and Metadata Element Sets and Library Linked Data Incubator Group: Use Cases.

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

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    JISC Collections Open Access Fees Project: Final Report

    Posted in Open Access, Reports and White Papers on October 24th, 2011

    JISC has released the JISC Collections Open Access Fees Project: Final Report.

    Here's an excerpt:

    The focus of this third phase was around the so-called hybrid model of OA publishing and the extent to which this can be seen as an optional model offered by publishers or a transitional one as part of the move away from subscription-based to fully Gold OA.

    It began with a series of in-depth one-to-one interviews with stakeholders within the Research Councils, other funding bodies, publishers and representatives from universities including librarians, institutional repository managers and research management. Interviewees were invited to answer a series of questions about the principles of the hybrid journal model, their attitudes towards it, the management of open-access fees at their organisation and their policy. . . .

    The results of the interviews were used to develop a workshop for stakeholders to ensure that presentations and discussions were focused on the key issues identified in the interviews. The workshop was held in May 2011 and was the final part of the project.

    | Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals | Digital Scholarship |

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      Benefits to the Private Sector of Open Access to Higher Education and Scholarly Research

      Posted in Open Access, Reports and White Papers on October 24th, 2011

      JISC has released Benefits to the Private Sector of Open Access to Higher Education and Scholarly Research.

      Here's an excerpt:

      The focus of the current study is not on assessing private sector demand, but on identifying, mapping and reviewing practical illustrations of benefits. In particular, the study was asked to look at:

      • Identifying and, where possible, quantifying tangible and attributable benefits in Open Access engagement to university research outputs.
      • Identifying success factors and recurrent enablers to realising these benefits.
      • Establishing illustrations of what and how benefits were realised, the timescale for realisation and transferability of that experience.

      The study was also asked to review the quality of available evidence, how this might be addressed and to propose an evidence-based typology of Open Access engagement and benefit realisation over the short, medium and longer-term.

      | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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        Negative and Slide Digitization: "Establishing Spatial Resolution Requirements for Digitizing Transmissive Content: A Use Case Approach"

        Posted in Digitization, Reports and White Papers on October 19th, 2011

        Image Science Associates has released "Establishing Spatial Resolution Requirements for Digitizing Transmissive Content: A Use Case Approach." This study was conducted for the Still Image Working Group of the Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative.

        Here's an excerpt:

        Guidelines for the digital conversion of transmissive content (negatives and positive slides) in the cultural heritage community have lagged behind those for print content. The primary reasons for this are twofold. Unlike print material, transmissive content is generally an intermediate format (as with negatives) or requires a viewing mechanism (such as a projector). In either case, there is no standard for the viewing of the object. The second challenge for digitization of transmissive content is, in large part, a result of the ambiguity of the visual output for slides or negatives.

        | Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

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          Revenue, Recession, Reliance: Revisiting the SCA/Ithaka S+R Case Studies in Sustainability

          Posted in Digital Libraries, Electronic Resources, Reports and White Papers on October 6th, 2011

          The Strategic Content Alliance has released Revenue, Recession, Reliance: Revisiting the SCA/Ithaka S+R Case Studies in Sustainability.

          Here's an excerpt:

          In 2009, the JISC-led Strategic Content Alliance commissioned Ithaka S+R to investigate the sustainability strategies of twelve digital content projects in the higher education and cultural heritage sectors, located in the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Germany and Egypt, to see how their leaders were developing cost-management and revenue strategies to foster longterm growth for ongoing digital projects

          Two years and one economic crisis later, Ithaka S+R, with the generous support of the JISC-led Strategic Content Alliance, conducted a new round of research and interviews with the leaders of the twelve projects that were the focus of our original case studies. Our goal was to see how their sustainability models had held up, where weaknesses might be starting to show, and what new strategies project leaders were adopting in response. How had budget cuts and other factors affected the projects? What had project leaders learned about making their resources valuable to users? Where did the resources—financial or non-financial—come from to make continued growth and innovation possible? And how could these lessons be useful to others?

          The research is documented in updates to the original twelve case studies. The final report, Revenue, Recession, Reliance: Revisiting the SCA / Ithaka Case Studies in Sustainability, provides a summary and analysis of findings across all twelve projects profiled.

          | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

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            Social Metadata for Libraries, Archives, and Museums, Part 1: Site Reviews

            Posted in Digital Archives and Special Collections, Libraries, Museums, Reports and White Papers, Social Media/Web 2.0 on October 4th, 2011

            OCLC Research has released Social Metadata for Libraries, Archives, and Museums, Part 1: Site Reviews.

            Here's an excerpt from the press release:

            Traditionally, staff at libraries, archives, and museums (LAMs) create metadata for the content they manage. However, social metadata—content contributed by users—is evolving as a way to both augment and recontextualize the content and metadata created by LAMs. Many cultural heritage institutions are interested in gaining a better understanding of social metadata and also learning how to best utilize their users' expertise to enrich their descriptive metadata and improve their users' experiences.

            In order to facilitate this, a 21-member RLG Partners Social Metadata Working Group reviewed 76 sites relevant to libraries, archives, and museums that supported such social media features as tagging, comments, reviews, images, videos, ratings, recommendations, lists, links to related articles, etc. In addition, working group members surveyed site managers, analyzed the survey results and discussed the factors that contribute to successful—and not so successful—use of social metadata. They also considered issues related to assessment, content, policies, technology, and vocabularies.

            This report includes an environmental scan of 76 social metadata sites and a detailed review of 24 representative sites.

            | New: Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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              Changing the Conduct of Science in the Information Age

              Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science, Reports and White Papers on September 1st, 2011

              The National Science Foundation has released Changing the Conduct of Science in the Information Age.

              Here's an excerpt:

              The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) held a workshop titled "Changing the Conduct of Science in the Information Age" on November 12, 2010, to promote international cooperation in such policy areas as the promotion of data access, the development of technical solutions for open data platforms, and attribution for research contributions. This report describes the discussions, findings, and suggestions generated by the distinguished group of international workshop participants. . . .

              There was a strong consensus that this vision could be achieved with the help of a concerted, collaborative effort by international funding agencies to:

              1. Establish a system of persistent identifiers for researchers and their outputs;
              2. Develop national and international pilot projects that compare different technical solutions for establishing and maintaining open data platforms, fostering the replication of scientific research, and ensuring attribution for the intellectual contributions of researchers; and
              3. Foster formal and informal training to develop scientists' skills in knowledge and data access, as well as data analysis.

              | New: Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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                Data Centres: Their Use, Value and Impact

                Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Repositories, Reports and White Papers on September 1st, 2011

                The Research Information Network has released Data Centres: Their Use, Value and Impact.

                Here's an excerpt:

                In recent years, the value of data as a primary research output has begun to be increasingly recognised. New technology has made it possible to create, store and reuse datasets, either for new analysis or for combination with other data in order to answer different questions. In the UK, academic researchers, funders and institutions have responded to these possibilities by supporting a number of data centres' organisations with responsibility for supplying research data to the academic community, and in some cases for collecting, storing and curating such data as well. . . .

                This study sought to understand usage of UK data centres among researchers, and to examine the impact of such use upon their work. We undertook a series of initial interviews with research funders to understand the role and importance of data and data centres within various academic fields, followed by a survey of the users of five data centres. Finally, through the interviews and surveys, a set of case studies was identified where the data centre had benefited a researcher's work, and in some cases that work had gone on to have an impact in wider society.

                | New: Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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                  An Open Access Future? Report from the Eurocancercoms Project

                  Posted in Open Access, Reports and White Papers on August 29th, 2011

                  The European Association for Cancer Research has released An Open Access Future? Report from the Eurocancercoms Project.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  A second survey picking up on the issue of Open Access publishing has now been completed. This paper shares the results of that survey, which was again conducted across the European membership of EACR, and cross references responses with selected data from the Study of Open Access Publishing (SOAP) 2011 [2] which was undertaken across all academic disciplines. The SOAP data is freely accessible and can be mined for information by anyone who wishes to use it. A number of questions were included in the survey that mirrored those used by SOAP, allowing the direct comparison of results. In this article a comparison has been made between the responses provided by cancer researchers and the 7,433 respondents to the SOAP survey from the Biological Sciences. (Over 43,000 responses were received across all disciplines to the SOAP survey.)

                  | New: Google Books Bibliography, Version 7 | Digital Scholarship |

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                    The Digital Revolution and Higher Education

                    Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers on August 29th, 2011

                    The Pew Research Center has released The Digital Revolution and Higher Education.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    • The Future of Online Learning. College presidents predict substantial growth in online learning: 15% say most of their current undergraduate students have taken a class online, and 50% predict that 10 years from now most of their students will take classes online.
                    • Digital Textbooks. Nearly two-thirds of college presidents (62%) anticipate that 10 years from now, more than half of the textbooks used by their undergraduate students will be entirely digital. . . .
                    • College Presidents and Technology. The leaders of the nation's colleges and universities are a tech-savvy group. Nearly nine-in-ten (87%) use a smartphone daily, 83% use a desktop computer and 65% use a laptop. And they are ahead of the curve on some of the newer digital technologies: Fully half (49%) use a tablet computer such as an iPad at least occasionally, and 42% use an e-reader such as a Kindle or Nook.

                    | New: Google Books Bibliography, Version 7 | Digital Scholarship |

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                      65% of Online Adults Use Social Networking Sites

                      Posted in Reports and White Papers, Social Media/Web 2.0 on August 28th, 2011

                      The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released 65% of Online Adults Use Social Networking Sites.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      Two-thirds of adult internet users (65%) now say they use a social networking site like MySpace, Facebook or LinkedIn, up from 61% one year ago. That's more than double the percentage that reported social networking site usage in 2008 (29%). And for the first time in Pew Internet surveys it means that half of all adults (50%) use social networking sites. The pace with which new users have flocked to social networking sites has been staggering; when we first asked about social networking sites in February of 2005, just 8% of internet users — or 5% of all adults — said they used them.

                      | New: Google Books Bibliography, Version 7 | Digital Scholarship |

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                        "Rome Wasn’t Digitized in a Day": Building a Cyberinfrastructure for Digital Classicists

                        Posted in Digital Humanities, Reports and White Papers on August 25th, 2011

                        The Council on Library and Information Resources has released "Rome Wasn't Digitized in a Day": Building a Cyberinfrastructure for Digital Classicists.

                        Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                        The author provides a summative and recent overview of the use of digital technologies in classical studies, focusing on classical Greece, Rome, and the ancient Middle and Near East, and generally on the period up to about 600 AD. The report explores what projects exist and how they are used, examines the infrastructure that currently exists to support digital classics as a discipline, and investigates larger humanities cyberinfrastructure projects and existing tools or services that might be repurposed for the digital classics.

                        | Digital Scholarship |

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