Archive for the 'Reports and White Papers' Category

Open Access: Interagency Public Access Coordination: A Report to Congress on the Coordination of Policies Related to the Dissemination and Long-Term Stewardship of the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Reports and White Papers on May 8th, 2012

The Executive Office of the President's National Science and Technology Council has released Interagency Public Access Coordination: A Report to Congress on the Coordination of Policies Related to the Dissemination and Long-Term Stewardship of the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research.

Here's an excerpt:

To summarize, the Administration been working on issues related to the management of and access to the results of federally funded scientific research. In accordance with ACRA, OSTP established the Task Force on Public Access to Scholarly Publications and re-chartered the Interagency Working Group on Digital Data under the NSTC CoS. Those groups are evaluating objectives for increasing access to and improving the management of the results of federally funded scientific research.

Three RFI's have been issued, two on public access to scholarly publications and one on the management of digital data. Responses to those RFIs are being analyzed now, but initial results show strong public support for increasing access to scholarly publications describing the results of federally funded research and for improving scientific data management and access. The NSTC groups are continuing to consider the public comments received from the RFIs and how they should be incorporated into the objectives required by ACRA. Once they have finalized their decisions, the objectives of all three groups will be combined and presented to the CoS. There, agency leadership will consider implementation options. In addition, the CoS will help prioritize the remaining responsibilities as described in ACRA Section 103 including further public consultation and international outreach necessary for developing agency-specific policies.

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: "This bibliography is recommended for everyone interested in open access publishing." — M. Blobaum, Journal of the Medical Library Association 100, no. 1 (2012): 73. | Digital Scholarship |

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    Persistent Digital Archives and Library System: Final Project Report to the Library of Congress, April 19, 2012

    Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Reports and White Papers on May 7th, 2012

    The PeDALS project has released Persistent Digital Archives and Library System: Final Project Report to the Library of Congress, April 19, 2012 .

    Here's an excerpt:

    The Persistent Digital Archives and Library System (PeDALS) research project was funded by the Library of Congress' National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program as part of its Preserving State Government Information initiative. The project explored the development of a curatorial rationale to support an automated workflow to process collections of digital publications and records, specifically using Microsoft BizTalk Server middleware to manage the collections and rules-based processes for their ingest. PeDALS also examined the practicality of Stanford University's LOCKSS, or Lots of Copies Keeps Stuff Safe, storage networks as an effective and inexpensive method of distributed preservation. In addition to those technical goals, PeDALS worked at building a community of shared practice among its partner states in the hopes that shared software development and best practices would foster a system that could be applied to a variety of repositories.

    | Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

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      Benefits of Open Access to Scholarly Research for Voluntary and Charitable Sector Organisations

      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 3rd, 2012

      JISC has released Benefits of Open Access to Scholarly Research for Voluntary and Charitable Sector Organisations.

      Here's an excerpt:

      We have learned in this study that the voluntary and charitable sector has an appetite and need for scholarly research that it cannot currently satisfy. The organisations contributing to the study have described the importance of research to the voluntary and charitable sector's commitment to playing its very distinctive role in the most effective way it can. In scoping interviews, case studies and survey responses, VCOs have identified a consistent set of barriers to accessing research. They have shown too that they are creative and resourceful, finding ways to overcome these barriers some of which might place them on or over the border of copyright infringement. We do not think that VCOs should be put in the position of having to choose between what is legally permitted and what they feel is ethically required of them in order to fulfil their charitable objectives. We think too that if the VCS is being asked to expand its role and play an increasing part in delivering public services, then access to research is essential. In this final chapter, we provide some recommendations which, we hope, will go some way to widening the voluntary and charitable sector's access to scholarly research outputs.

      | Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals: This is an excellent resource for its extensive background documentation of the open access arguments and issues. — Ann Jensen, Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, no. 43 (2005) | Digital Scholarship |

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        Benefits of Open Access to Scholarly Research to the Public Sector

        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 3rd, 2012

        JISC has released Benefits of Open Access to Scholarly Research to the Public Sector.

        Here's an excerpt:

        The total cost to the public sector of accessing journal papers is around £135 million per annum. The savings that accrue from the availability of Open Access articles (using both Green and Gold routes) amount to £28.6 million (£26 million in access fees and £2.6 million in time savings).

        Extending the number or articles available through Open Access further increases the potential for savings. Each extra 5% of journal papers accessed via Open Access would save the public sector £1.7 million, even if no subscription fees were to be saved. Increasing the number of journal papers accessed through Open Access to 25% would save the public sector an extra £29 million.

        | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: "This work gives an outstanding overview of scholarship relating to the growing Open Access movement." — George Machovec, The Charleston Advisor 12, no. 2 (2010): 3. | Digital Scholarship |

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          Report on Peer Review of Digital Repositories

          Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Repositories, Reports and White Papers on May 2nd, 2012

          The Alliance for Permanent Access to the Records of Science Network has released the Report on Peer Review of Digital Repositories.

          Here's an excerpt:

          This document reports on the work which has been undertaken in support of the European Framework for Audit and Certification of Digital Repositories which was initiated by the European Commission's unit which funds APARSEN. . . .

          The main part of this report provides details of the test audits which were carried out, the problems encountered and the lessons learned. The European repositories were the Deutsche Nationalbibliothek (DNB), Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS), UK Data Archive (UKDA), Centre Informatique National de l'Enseignement Supérieur: Département Archivage et Diffusion (CINES-DAD) and in addition, in the USA, the Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC) at the Center for Earth Science Information, the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) and the Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives (KDLA).

          | Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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            Report on Peer Review of Research Data in Scholarly Communication

            Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Reports and White Papers on May 2nd, 2012

            The Alliance for Permanent Access to the Records of Science Network has released the Report on Peer Review of Research Data in Scholarly Communication.

            Here's an excerpt:

            This report documents ideas, attitudes, developments and discussion concerning quality assurance of research data. The focus is on action taken by scientists, e-infrastructure providers and scientific journals. Their measures are documented and categorized. Future fields of research are to be described based on this work.

            | Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010: "If you're looking for a reading list that will keep you busy from now until the end of time, this is your one-stop shop for all things digital preservation." — "Digital Preservation Reading List," Preservation Services at Dartmouth College weblog, February 21, 2012. | Digital Scholarship |

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              Know Your Limits: Considering the Role of Data Caps and Usage Based Billing in Internet Access Service

              Posted in Digital Culture, Net Neutrality, Reports and White Papers on April 29th, 2012

              Public Knowledge has released Know Your Limits: Considering the Role of Data Caps and Usage Based Billing in Internet Access Service by Andrew Odlyzko, Bill St. Arnaud, Erik Stallman; and Michael Weinberg.

              Here's an excerpt:

              Regardless of the motivation driving its implementation, usage-based pricing has the potential to significantly impact how networks are designed and used. This, in turn, impacts the innovation that relies on those networks. Before deciding if and when usage-based pricing is desirable, it is critical to fully understand the history of usage-based pricing, how it impacts markets, and both the benefits and harms that such a model can bring.

              This paper aims to explain the basic issues surrounding usage-based versus flat-rate pricing. Section I examines the trend towards usage-based pricing in both the wired and wireless markets. Section II then considers the benefits and justifications for using usage-based pricing. This is followed in Section III by a review of the history and economics of flat rate pricing. Since broadband access is central to so many national and societal goals, the penultimate section—Section IV—discusses the problems that might be caused by usage-based pricing. Finally, we end with a series of conclusions and recommendations for responsible implementation of usage-based pricing.

              | Reviews of Digital Scholarship Publications | Digital Scholarship |

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                Social Metadata for Libraries, Archives, and Museums. Part 3: Recommendations and Readings

                Posted in Digital Archives and Special Collections, Libraries, Metadata, Museums, Reports and White Papers, Social Media/Web 2.0 on April 23rd, 2012

                OCLC Research has released Social Metadata for Libraries, Archives, and Museums. Part 3: Recommendations and Readings.

                Here's an excerpt from the press release:

                In the first report, the 21-member Social Metadata Working Group reviewed 76 sites relevant to libraries, archives, and museums that supported such social media features as tagging, comments, reviews, images, videos, ratings, recommendations, lists, links to related articles, etc. The results from a survey of site managers conducted in October-November 2009 were included in the second report. Social Metadata for Libraries, Archives and Museums, Part 3: Recommendations and Readings provides recommendations on social metadata features most relevant to libraries, archives, and museums and an annotated reading list of the literature consulted during this research. Social Metadata for Libraries, Archives and Museums: Executive Summary provides a high-level overview of all three reports. The group's final recommendation is that it is riskier to do nothing and become irrelevant to our user communities than to start using social media features.

                Also available: Social Metadata for Libraries, Archives and Museums: Executive Summary."

                | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

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