Archive for the 'Reports and White Papers' Category

Report on Integration of Data and Publications

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Publishing, Reports and White Papers on November 20th, 2011

The Alliance for Permanent Access has released Report on Integration of Data and Publications.

Here's an excerpt:

This report sets out to identify examples of integration between datasets and publications. Findings from existing studies carried out by PARSE.Insight, RIN, SURF and various recent publications are synthesized and examined in relation to three distinct disciplinary groups in order to identify opportunities in the integration of data.

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

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    Report on the Data Curation Research Summit

    Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Reports and White Papers on November 20th, 2011

    Nicholas Weber et al. have self-archived Report on the Data Curation Research Summit in IDEALS.

    Here's an excerpt:

    The Data Curation Research Summit was a one-day meeting, sponsored by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). The objectives were to build awareness of current research projects and important research problems, foster stronger collaborations among researchers, and advance the Library and Information Science (LIS) research agenda in data curation. It was held in Chicago on December 9th, 2010, following the 6th International Digital Curation Conference (IDCC). The conference provided an excellent opportunity to bring together scholars and practitioners with a strong interest in advancing scholarship and practice in the curation of research data. The 35 invited participants, representing iSchools, research libraries, academic publishers, and funding agencies, are active in the growing research community and related areas of digital curation and archives.

    | Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

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      Why Americans Use Social Media

      Posted in Reports and White Papers, Social Media/Web 2.0 on November 15th, 2011

      The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released Why Americans Use Social Media.

      Here's an excerpt:

      Two-thirds of online adults (66%) use social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, MySpace or LinkedIn. These internet users say that connections with family members and friends (both new and old) are a primary consideration in their adoption of social media tools. Roughly two thirds of social media users say that staying in touch with current friends and family members is a major reason they use these sites, while half say that connecting with old friends they've lost touch with is a major reason behind their use of these technologies.

      | Google Books Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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        Research Infrastructures in the Digital Humanities

        Posted in Digital Humanities, Reports and White Papers on November 3rd, 2011

        The European Science Foundation has released Research Infrastructures in the Digital Humanities.

        Here's an excerpt:

        This peer reviewed document reflects on the centrality of Research Infrastructures (RIs) to the Humanities. It argues that without RIs such as archives, libraries, academies, museums and galleries (and the sources that they identify, order, preserve and make accessible) significant strands of Humanities research would not be possible. After proposing a wide-ranging definition of digital RIs—with the aim of reflecting on the meaning of infrastructure in the Humanities rather than on those parts common to other domains of science—it attempts to relate physical RIs to digital ones. By drawing on a number of case studies—chosen to showcase the variety of research around existing or emerging infrastructures—it demonstrates that digital RIs offer Humanities scholars new and productive ways to explore old questions and develop new ones.

        | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, Version 80 | Digital Scholarship |

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          Library Publishing Services: Strategies for Success: Research Report, Version 1.0

          Posted in Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries on November 1st, 2011

          SPARC and the Academic Resources Coalition have released Library Publishing Services: Strategies for Success: Research Report, Version 1.0.

          Here's an excerpt from the press release:

          Key findings of the project include:
          • Approximately half (55%) of all respondents to the survey indicated having or developing library publishing services. Interest in such services varied by institution size, with over three-quarters of ARLs being interested, compared to 30% of Oberlin Group institutions. Most libraries with existing programs anticipated increasing the program's scale or scope in the next year.
          • About three-quarters of the programs publish between one and six journals, the majority of which are only distributed electronically and are less than three-years old. About half of the programs publish conference proceedings, technical reports, or monographs; most often electronically, but with some print-on-demand distribution.
          • The vast majority of library publishing programs (almost 90%) were launched in order to contribute to change in the scholarly publishing system, supplemented by a variety of other mission-related motivations. The prevalence of mission-driven rationale aligns with the funding sources reported for library publishing programs, including library budget reallocations (97%), temporary funding from the institution (67%), and grant support (57%). However, many respondents expect a greater percentage of future publishing program funding to come from service fees, product revenue, charge-backs, royalties, and other program-generated income.
          • Almost two-thirds of the programs collaborate with one or more other campus units—including departmental faculty, university press, and campus computing—and two-thirds collaborate with individuals or organizations outside of the institution. Over half of the respondents expect collaborations to increase in the next year.
          • About half of responding institutions centralize management of their publishing activities within one library unit. The number of staff allocated to publishing activities is modest—averaging 2.4 FTE for ARLs and 0.9 FTE for Oberlin Group institutions—with older programs typically being larger. Staff dedicated exclusively to publishing service programs are relatively rare, with responsibility for such services typically fragmented across multiple staff members.
          • The perceived relevance of publishing services to the library's mission, and the integration of such services into the library's budget, helps explain the relative lack of emphasis on sustainability planning. Few institutions (15%) have a documented sustainability plan for their publishing services, and only a fifth have evaluated the value or effectiveness of their publishing services.
          • The most prevalent journal publishing platforms reported were Open Journal Systems (57%), DSpace (36%), and Berkeley Electronic Press's Digital Commons (25%).

          | Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals | Digital Scholarship |

          Digital Scholarship |

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            Legal Issues in Mass Digitization: A Preliminary Analysis and Discussion Document

            Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Books, Google and Other Search Engines, Mass Digitizaton, Publishing, Reports and White Papers on November 1st, 2011

            The U.S. Office of the Register of Copyrights has released Legal Issues in Mass Digitization: A Preliminary Analysis and Discussion Document .

            Here's the announcement:

            The Copyright Office has published a Preliminary Analysis and Discussion Document that addresses the issues raised by the intersection between copyright law and the mass digitization of books. The purpose of the Analysis is to facilitate further discussions among the affected parties and the public discussions that may encompass a number of possible approaches, including voluntary initiatives, legislative options, or both. The Analysis also identifies questions to consider in determining an appropriate policy for the mass digitization of books.

            Public discourse on mass digitization is particularly timely. On March 22, 2011, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York rejected a proposed settlement in the copyright infringement litigation regarding Google's mass book digitization project. The court found that the settlement would have redefined the relationship between copyright law and new technology, and it would have encroached upon Congress's ability to set copyright policy with respect to orphan works. Since then, a group of authors has filed a lawsuit against five university libraries that participated in Google's mass digitization project. These developments have sparked a public debate on the risks and opportunities that mass book digitization may create for authors, publishers, libraries, technology companies, and the general public. The Office's Analysis will serve as a basis for further policy discussions on this issue.

            | Google Books Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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              A Bibliographic Framework for the Digital Age

              Posted in Metadata, Reports and White Papers on October 31st, 2011

              The Library of Congress has released A Bibliographic Framework for the Digital Age.

              Here's an excerpt:

              Although the MARC-based infrastructure is extensive, and MARC has been adapted to changing technologies, a major effort to create a comparable exchange vehicle that is grounded in the current and expected future shape of data interchange is needed. To assure a new environment will allow reuse of valuable data and remain supportive of the current one, in addition to advancing it, the following requirements provide a basis for this work. Discussion with colleagues in the community has informed these requirements for beginning the transition to a "new bibliographic framework". Bibliographic framework is intended to indicate an environment rather than a "format".

              | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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                Linked Data for Libraries, Museums, and Archives: Survey and Workshop Report

                Posted in Linking, Linked Data, and Semantic Web, Reports and White Papers on October 31st, 2011

                The Council on Library and Information Resources has released Linked Data for Libraries, Museums, and Archives: Survey and Workshop Report.

                Here's an excerpt:

                In June 2011, Stanford University hosted a group of librarians and technologists to examine issues and challenges surrounding the use of linked data for library applications. This report summarizes the activities and discussions that took place during the workshop, describes what came out of the workshop, outlines next steps identified by the participants, and provides contextual and background information, including preliminary reports and biographies of workshop participants. The workshop report was produced and edited by the participants and staff at Stanford University Libraries.

                As background for workshop participants, CLIR commissioned Jerry Persons, technology analyst at Knowledge Motifs and Chief Information Architect emeritus at Stanford, to produce a survey of the linked-data landscape, and the projects and individuals associated with it. The survey focuses on the practical aspects of understanding and applying linked data practices and technologies to the metadata and content of libraries, museums, and archives. There are numerous links in the report and the survey that lead readers to many other sources and examples regarding the use of linked data methods.

                | Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

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                  Library Linked Data Incubator Group Final Report

                  Posted in Linking, Linked Data, and Semantic Web, Reports and White Papers on October 25th, 2011

                  The W3C Incubator Group has released Library Linked Data Incubator Group Final Report.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  Key recommendations of the report are:

                  • That library leaders identify sets of data as possible candidates for early exposure as Linked Data and foster a discussion about Open Data and rights;
                  • That library standards bodies increase library participation in Semantic Web standardization, develop library data standards that are compatible with Linked Data, and disseminate best-practice design patterns tailored to library Linked Data;
                  • That data and systems designers design enhanced user services based on Linked Data capabilities, create URIs for the items in library datasets, develop policies for managing RDF vocabularies and their URIs, and express library data by re-using or mapping to existing Linked Data vocabularies;
                  • That librarians and archivists preserve Linked Data element sets and value vocabularies and apply library experience in curation and long-term preservation to Linked Data datasets.

                  See also the related reports: Library Linked Data Incubator Group: Datasets, Value Vocabularies, and Metadata Element Sets and Library Linked Data Incubator Group: Use Cases.

                  | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

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                    JISC Collections Open Access Fees Project: Final Report

                    Posted in Open Access, Reports and White Papers on October 24th, 2011

                    JISC has released the JISC Collections Open Access Fees Project: Final Report.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    The focus of this third phase was around the so-called hybrid model of OA publishing and the extent to which this can be seen as an optional model offered by publishers or a transitional one as part of the move away from subscription-based to fully Gold OA.

                    It began with a series of in-depth one-to-one interviews with stakeholders within the Research Councils, other funding bodies, publishers and representatives from universities including librarians, institutional repository managers and research management. Interviewees were invited to answer a series of questions about the principles of the hybrid journal model, their attitudes towards it, the management of open-access fees at their organisation and their policy. . . .

                    The results of the interviews were used to develop a workshop for stakeholders to ensure that presentations and discussions were focused on the key issues identified in the interviews. The workshop was held in May 2011 and was the final part of the project.

                    | Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals | Digital Scholarship |

                    Digital Scholarship |

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                      Benefits to the Private Sector of Open Access to Higher Education and Scholarly Research

                      Posted in Open Access, Reports and White Papers on October 24th, 2011

                      JISC has released Benefits to the Private Sector of Open Access to Higher Education and Scholarly Research.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      The focus of the current study is not on assessing private sector demand, but on identifying, mapping and reviewing practical illustrations of benefits. In particular, the study was asked to look at:

                      • Identifying and, where possible, quantifying tangible and attributable benefits in Open Access engagement to university research outputs.
                      • Identifying success factors and recurrent enablers to realising these benefits.
                      • Establishing illustrations of what and how benefits were realised, the timescale for realisation and transferability of that experience.

                      The study was also asked to review the quality of available evidence, how this might be addressed and to propose an evidence-based typology of Open Access engagement and benefit realisation over the short, medium and longer-term.

                      | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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                        Negative and Slide Digitization: "Establishing Spatial Resolution Requirements for Digitizing Transmissive Content: A Use Case Approach"

                        Posted in Digitization, Reports and White Papers on October 19th, 2011

                        Image Science Associates has released "Establishing Spatial Resolution Requirements for Digitizing Transmissive Content: A Use Case Approach." This study was conducted for the Still Image Working Group of the Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        Guidelines for the digital conversion of transmissive content (negatives and positive slides) in the cultural heritage community have lagged behind those for print content. The primary reasons for this are twofold. Unlike print material, transmissive content is generally an intermediate format (as with negatives) or requires a viewing mechanism (such as a projector). In either case, there is no standard for the viewing of the object. The second challenge for digitization of transmissive content is, in large part, a result of the ambiguity of the visual output for slides or negatives.

                        | Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

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