Archive for the 'Research Libraries' Category

"Gathering the Needles: Evaluating the Impact of Gold Open Access Content with Traditional Subscription Journals"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on July 6th, 2016

Alison Bobal and Jill Emery have published "Gathering the Needles: Evaluating the Impact of Gold Open Access Content with Traditional Subscription Journals" in Insights: the UKSG Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

Utilizing the Project COUNTER Release 4 JR1-GOA report, two librarians explore these data in comparison to journal package subscriptions represented via the JR1 reports. This paper outlines the methodology and study undertaken at the Portland State University Library and the University of Nebraska Medical Center Library using these reports for the first time. The initial outcomes of the study are provided in various Tables for 2014 and 2015. The intent of the study was to provide both institutions with a baseline from which to do further study. In addition, some ideas are given for how these reports can be used in vendor negotiations going forward.

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"Rethinking Authentication, Revamping the Business"

Posted in Authentication and Security, Libraries, Publishing, Research Libraries on June 23rd, 2016

Roger C. Schonfeld has published "Rethinking Authentication, Revamping the Business" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

While I have heard these arguments on and off this year, the meeting hosted by CCC [Copyright Clearance Center] made abundantly clear that there is great dissatisfaction with IP-based authentication across the community. Publishers want to move away from it due to their piracy concerns, their desire to improve seamlessness for researchers, and their expectations about the value they can offer through greater personalization. . . . And at least some academic librarians want to move away from it because of the poor user experience, especially with off-site access. Taking aim at IP authentication and proxy servers has become all the rage. But what might supplant them?

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"The Academic Data Librarian Profession in Canada: History and Future Directions"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Research Libraries on June 22nd, 2016

S. Vincent Gray and Elizabeth Hill have self-archived "The Academic Data Librarian Profession in Canada: History and Future Directions."

Here's an excerpt:

From the 1970s onward, Canadians have been active in developing services and establishing structures to support the dissemination of data. In recent years the academic data profession in Canada has largely developed around access to data from the national statistics agency, Statistics Canada, and around the services which have been developed to permit access to these data. This chapter will provide a historical background for these activities and explain how current and emerging trends continue to affect the profession.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 6. Over 560 works. Over 200 works added. Live links. Selected abstracts. OA. CC-BY License. Covers topics such as research data creation, acquisition, metadata, repositories, provenance, management, policies, support services, funding agency requirements, peer review, publication, citation, sharing, reuse, and preservation.

Libraries as Publishers in the Early 1990s

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals, Texas Academic Libraries on June 22nd, 2016

In recent years, there has been an upsurge in interest in academic and other types libraries acting as publishers and considerable discussion about how this will transform them.

What is sometimes lost in the excitement over the library publishing movement is historical context: this trend started over a quarter century ago at the dawn of the Internet age. While most e-journals published in the early 1990s were produced by scholars acting as digital publishers, at least two academic libraries established formal digital publishing programs in this period: the University of Houston Libraries and the Virginia Tech Libraries.

In August 1989, the Director of the University of Houston Libraries, Robin N. Downes, authorized the establishment and announcement of The Public-Access Computer Systems Review (PACS Review), the first open access journal in the field of library and information science. The journal began publication in January 1990, became refereed in November 1991, and ceased publication in August 2000. Authors retained the copyright to PACS Review articles. Unrestricted copying of PACS Review articles was permitted for educational, noncommercial use by academic computer centers, individual scholars, and libraries.

Only partial use statistics are available for the journal. It was initially distributed using the LISTSERV software, and LISTSERV use statistics were not tallied. From 1994 through 1996, the journal received over 81,000 Gopher requests. From March 1995 through 2005, the journal received over 3.5 file requests via the Web.

In October 1996, Robin N. Downes authorized the establishment of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, an open access, updated electronic book that provided references to new works related to scholarly electronic publishing, such as books, journal articles, magazine articles, technical reports, and white papers.

Between October 1996 and October 2006, 64 versions of the e-book were published by the University of Houston Libraries. There were over six million file requests for it during this period.

In the fall of 1989, Virginia Tech's Vice President for Information Systems, Dr. Robert Heterick, established the Scholarly Communications Project. The project was subsequently moved to the University Libraries, and it was directed by Lon Savage until December 1993, when Gail McMillan took over.

Since 1990, the Virginia Tech Libraries have published a number of e-journals, some of which were previously published by other entities prior to being migrated to the Libraries. Notably, the Scholarly Communications Project published the first issue of The Journal of the International Academy of Hospitality Research in November 1990. The journal was published in cooperation with Virginia Tech's Department of Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management. It ceased publication in 1998. It is described in "The Journal of the International Academy of Hospitality Research."

The Virginia Tech Libraries' Scholarly Communication department currently publishes e-journals, conference proceedings, and open educational resources.

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"Open Access, Innovation, and Research Infrastructure"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on June 21st, 2016

Benedikt Fecher and Gert G. Wagner have published "Open Access, Innovation, and Research Infrastructure" in Publications.

Here's an excerpt:

In this article we argue that the current endeavors to achieve open access in scientific literature require a discussion about innovation in scholarly publishing and research infrastructure. Drawing on path dependence theory and addressing different open access (OA) models and recent political endeavors, we argue that academia is once again running the risk of outsourcing the organization of its content.

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"Scholarly Communication and the Dilemma of Collective Action: Why Academic Journals Cost Too Much"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on June 10th, 2016

College & Research Libraries has released an e-print of "Scholarly Communication and the Dilemma of Collective Action: Why Academic Journals Cost Too Much" by John Wenzler.

Here's an excerpt:

Why has the rise of the Internet—which drastically reduces the cost of distributing information—coincided with drastic increases in the prices that academic libraries pay for access to scholarly journals?This study argues that libraries are trapped in a collective action dilemma as defined by economist Mancur Olson in The Logic of Collective Action: Public Goods and the Theory of Groups. To truly reduce their costs, librarians would have to build a shared online collection of scholarly resources jointly managed by the academic community as a whole, but individual academic institutions lack the private incentives necessary to invest in a shared collection. Thus, the management of online scholarly journals has been largely outsourced to publishers who have developed monopoly powers that allow them to increase subscription prices faster than the rate of inflation. Many librarians consider the Open Access Movement the best response to increased subscription costs, but the current strategies employed to achieve Open Access also are undermined by collective action dilemmas. In conclusion, some alternative strategies are proposed.

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Hillman University Librarian and Director, University Library System at University of Pittsburgh

Posted in ARL Libraries, Research Libraries on June 6th, 2016

The University of Pittsburgh is recruiting a Hillman University Librarian and Director, University Library System.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

A member of the Association of American Universities, current enrollment in Pitt's 16 undergraduate and graduate schools and 4 regional campuses is 34,934 (25,074 undergraduate and 9,860 graduate students).

In 2015, the University's federally funded research summed to almost $600 million. . . .

The ULS is comprised of 11 libraries and holdings of nearly 7.2 million volumes and employs a total FTE count of 180. The director oversees the ULS budget, which in 2015 was approximately $32 million.

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"After Copyright Win, GSU Seeks $3.3 Million from Publishers "

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Research Libraries on May 3rd, 2016

Andrew Albanese has published "After Copyright Win, GSU Seeks $3.3 Million from Publishers" in Publishers Weekly.

Here's an excerpt:

After winning a key copyright decision, attorneys for Georgia State University want the publishers who brought the suit to pay more than $3.3 million dollars in fees and costs.

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"Research Library Associations Endorse Open Data Accord"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science, Research Libraries on May 2nd, 2016

ARL has released "Research Library Associations Endorse Open Data Accord."

Here's an excerpt:

IARLA [International Alliance of Research Library Associations] views the Science International accord on "Open Data in a Big Data World" as an important step towards creating and enabling this common vision of the importance of open data. In setting out principles for open data that are derived from emerging practices within the scientific community, the accord lends the voice of a key stakeholder to the case for open data and provides a practical road map for the implementation of open data at the global level.

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Simon Neame Named Dean of Libraries at University of Massachusetts Amherst

Posted in ARL Libraries, People in the News, Research Libraries on April 26th, 2016

Simon Neame has been named the Dean of Libraries at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

At UBC, Neame oversees 33 professional librarians and 114 support staff as associate university librarian, learning and engagement. His budget responsibilities include the Barber Centre, the Walter C. Koerner Library for humanities and social sciences, the Woodard Library for health sciences, science and applied science, the Music, Art and Architecture Library, access services and the library's teaching, learning and community engagement programs. . . .

He holds a bachelor's degree from the University of Victoria and a master's of library and information studies from UBC.

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Valerie Hotchkiss Named as University Librarian at Vanderbilt University

Posted in ARL Libraries, People in the News, Research Libraries on April 22nd, 2016

Valerie Hotchkiss, Andrew S.G. Turyn Endowed Professor and Director of the Rare Book and Manuscript Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been named as the University Librarian at Vanderbilt University.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

At the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Hotchkiss built visibility for the collections and promoted the study of primary resources as an integral part of the school's curriculum. . . . In addition, she served as editor-in-chief of Women in Print, a digital humanities publishing project of the University of Illinois Press. . . .

From 1993 to 2005, Hotchkiss was the J.S. Bridwell Foundation Endowed Librarian and professor of medieval studies at Southern Methodist University, where she raised more than $16 million for the library's endowment and introduced many new community initiatives. . . .

She also served as library director for Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary and was employed by Yale University's Divinity School Library. She earned three degrees—master of arts, master of philosophy, and doctorate in medieval studies—all from Yale. In addition, she earned a master of library science from Southern Connecticut State University.

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John M. Unsworth Named as University of Virginia University Librarian and Dean of Libraries

Posted in ARL Libraries, People in the News, Research Libraries on April 20th, 2016

John M. Unsworth, Vice Provost, University Librarian, Chief Information Officer, and Professor of English at Brandeis University, has been named as the new University Librarian and Dean of Libraries at the University of Virginia .

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

He received his Ph.D. in English from UVA in 1988, and later in his career became a tenured associate professor of English at the University, as well the first director of UVA's Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities. Recognized as a pioneer in the field of digital humanities, he is the co-founder of the first peer-reviewed electronic journal in the humanities, Postmodern Culture.

Before going to Brandeis, Unsworth was dean of the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he also held faculty appointments in library and information science, English, and library administration. His first faculty appointment was as an assistant professor in English at North Carolina State University.

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