Archive for the 'Research Libraries' Category

"Developments in Research Data Management in Academic Libraries: towards an Understanding of Research Data Service Maturity"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Research Libraries on October 27th, 2016

Andrew M. Cox et al. have self-archived "Developments in Research Data Management in Academic Libraries: towards an Understanding of Research Data Service Maturity."

Here's an excerpt:

This paper reports an international study of research data management (RDM) activities, services and capabilities in higher education libraries. It presents the results of a survey covering higher education libraries in Australia, Canada, Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands, New Zealand and the UK. The results indicate that libraries have provided leadership in RDM, particularly in advocacy and policy development. Service development is still limited, focused especially on advisory and consultancy services (such as data management planning support and data-related training), rather than technical services (such as provision of a data catalogue, and curation of active data). Data curation skills development is underway in libraries, but skills and capabilities are not consistently in place and remain a concern. Other major challenges include resourcing, working with other support services, and achieving 'buy in' from researchers and senior managers.

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"ARL Membership Convenes in Washington, DC, for Fall 2016 Meeting"

Posted in ARL Libraries, Research Libraries on October 25th, 2016

ARL has released "ARL Membership Convenes in Washington, DC, for Fall 2016 Meeting. "

Here's an excerpt:

Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member representatives, ARL leadership fellows, staff, and guests gathered in Washington, DC, on Tuesday-Wednesday, September 27-28, 2016, for the 169th Association Meeting. All available presentation slides are linked from the speakers' names or session titles in the following summary of the meeting.

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"New University Presses in the UK: Accessing a Mission"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals, University Presses on October 17th, 2016

Andrew Lockett and Lara Speicher have published "New University Presses in the UK: Accessing a Mission" in Learned Publishing.

Here's an excerpt:

In the space of just a year, five new university presses were launched in the UK. Although very different in size and stages of development, all but one were launched first and foremost as open access presses, based in or supported by their university's library. Why should there have been such a significant flurry of activity in such a short space of time, and what can the stated objectives and activities of these presses tell us about the current UK scholarly publishing environment? To answer some of those questions, this article looks back to the original mission of the founding university presses, examines the policy and funding environments in which the new presses are operating, looks at overseas developments in recent years for comparison, and concludes with a review of the challenges these young presses face as well as the benefits all university presses, but particularly open access ones, can confer to their institutions.

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"Why Marriage Matters: A North American Perspective on Press/Library Partnerships"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals, University Presses on October 17th, 2016

Charles Watkinson has published "Why Marriage Matters: A North American Perspective on Press/Library Partnerships" in Learned Publishing.

Here's an excerpt:

Key points

  • Around 30% of campus-based members of the Association of American University Presses now report to libraries, more than double the number 5 years ago.
  • Beyond reporting relationships, physical collocation and joint strategic planning characterize the most integrated press/library partnerships.
  • The main mutual advantages of deep press/library collaboration are economic efficiency, greater relevance to parent institutions, and an increased capacity to engage with the changing needs of authors in the digital age.
  • There is emerging interest in collaboration at scale among libraries and presses that may extend the impact of press/library collaboration beyond single institutions.

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"Library Collections in the Life of the User: Two Directions"

Posted in Research Libraries on October 14th, 2016

Lorcan Dempsey has published "Library Collections in the Life of the User: Two Directions" in .

Here's an excerpt:

The paper considers how the changing nature of research in digital environments is reshaping the nature of library collections and services in academic and research libraries. It describes two central directions, each a response to the centrality of the user in a network environment. First, the library has an increasing role in managing the research and other outputs of the university (the inside-out collection). Second, the library is facilitating access to a broader range of local, external and collaborative resources organized around user needs (the facilitated collection).

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"SCOAP3 Journals Double Downloads"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on October 12th, 2016

SCOAP3 has released "SCOAP3 Journals Double Downloads."

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The four largest journals participating in SCOAP3, two published by Elsevier and two by SpringerNature in partnership with the Italian Physical Society (SIF), and the Italian Institute for Advanced Studies (SISSA) have now analysed their logs to understand the impact of SCOAP3.

Elsevier announced that downloads to their two journals, Physics Letters B and Nuclear Physics B have doubled since they became Open Access at the start of SCOAP3 in January 2014. This increase is remarkable as SCOAP3 covers the most recent 3,500 articles in the journals, while most of the historic content of over 77,000 articles, is available to subscribers.

SpringerNature announced that since January 2014 they have observed a doubling of downloads across their two learned-society journals participating in SCOAP3: European Physical Journal C and the Journal of High Energy Physics.

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Vice Provost & University Librarian at Washington University in St. Louis

Posted in ARL Libraries, Research Libraries on September 22nd, 2016

Washington University in St. Louis is recruiting a Vice Provost & University Librarian.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The Vice Provost and University Librarian oversees 142 staff members and is responsible for an annual budget of $23 million. The libraries' organization includes 6 Associate University Librarians, 28 subject librarians, and 8 curators/archivists.

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"What Kind of World Is STM Living In?

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on September 20th, 2016

The League of European Research Universities has released What Kind of World Is STM Living In.

Here's an excerpt:

4 September saw the International Association of STM publishers (STM) issue a response to the EC's proposed Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market, which flies in the face of LERU's views contained in its own Press Release. Amongst other things, STM is calling for the extension of ancillary copyright to cover academic publishing, implying that they will take legal action if this does not happen. . . . Ancillary copyright in this case would extend copyright protection, not allowing academics and universities freely to link to/use the world of information on the Internet, placing publishers in control of the information environment. LERU rejects this as counter to academic freedom and to the EC's vison for Open Science.

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"Collaborative Academic Library Digital Collections Post-Cambridge University Press, HathiTrust and Google Decisions on Fair Use"

Posted in Copyright, Digitization, Mass Digitizaton, Research Libraries on September 13th, 2016

Michelle M. Wu has published "Collaborative Academic Library Digital Collections Post-Cambridge University Press, HathiTrust and Google Decisions on Fair Use" in the Journal of Copyright in Education and Librarianship.

Here's an excerpt:

Academic libraries face numerous stressors as they seek to meet the needs of their users through technological advances while adhering to copyright laws. This paper seeks to explore one specific proposal to balance these interests, the impact of recent decisions on its viability, and the copyright challenges that remain after these decisions

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"More than a House of Cards: Developing a Firm Foundation for Streaming Media and Consumer-Licensed Content in the Library"

Posted in Copyright, Research Libraries on September 13th, 2016

William Cross has published "More than a House of Cards: Developing a Firm Foundation for Streaming Media and Consumer-Licensed Content in the Library" in the Journal of Copyright in Education and Librarianship..

Here's an excerpt:

This article will introduce traditional library practice for licensing multimedia content and discuss the way that consumer-licensing and streaming services disrupt that practice. Sections II and III describe the statutory copyright regime designed by Congress to facilitate the socially-valuable work done by libraries and the impact of the move from ownership to licensed content. Collecting multimedia materials has always presented special legal challenges for libraries, particularly as licensed content has replaced the traditional practice of purchasing and circulation based on the first sale doctrine. These issues have grown even more complex as streaming services like Netflix and Amazon and video game downloads through services like Steam have come to dominate the landscape. Section IV will describe the way that consumer-licensed materials, which not only remove the ownership that undergirds library practice, but also the ability to negotiate for library use, imperil the congressionally-designed balance. Section V will present a path forward for libraries to develop robust, cutting-edge collections that reflect a sophisticated understanding of the contractual and copyright issues at play.

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"Publishers Appeal GSU Copyright Case"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on August 30th, 2016

Andrew Albanese has published "Publishers Appeal GSU Copyright Case" in Publishers Weekly.

Here's an excerpt:

Following their second district court loss in eight years of litigation, the publisher plaintiffs in Cambridge University Press vs. Patton (known commonly as the GSU e-reserves case) have again appealed the case.

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"Write up! A Study of Copyright Information on Library-Published Journals"

Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on July 20th, 2016

Melanie Schlosser has published "Write up! A Study of Copyright Information on Library-Published Journals" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

INTRODUCTION Libraries have a mission to educate users about copyright, and library publishing staff are often involved in that work. This article investigates a concrete point of intersection between the two areas—copyright statements on library-published journals. METHODS Journals published by members of the Library Publishing Coalition were examined for open access status, type and placement of copyright information, copyright ownership, and open licensing. RESULTS Journals in the sample were overwhelmingly (93%) open access. 80% presented copyright information of some kind, but only 30% of those included it at both the journal and the article level. Open licensing was present in 38% of the journals, and the most common ownership scenario was the author retaining copyright while granting a nonexclusive license to the journal or publisher. 9% of the sample journals included two or more conflicting rights statements. DISCUSSION 76% of the journals did not consistently provide accurate, easily-accessible rights information, and numerous problems were found with the use of open licensing, including conflicting licenses, incomplete licenses, and licenses not appearing at the article level. CONCLUSION Recommendations include presenting full copyright and licensing information at both the journal and the article level, careful use of open licenses, and publicly-available author agreements. External Data or Supplements:

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