Archive for the 'Scholarly Communication' Category

"Riding the Crest of the Altmetrics Wave: How Librarians Can Help Prepare Faculty for the Next Generation of Research Impact Metrics"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on June 5th, 2013

Scott Lapinski, Heather Piwowar, and Jason Priem have published "Riding the Crest of the Altmetrics Wave: How Librarians Can Help Prepare Faculty for the Next Generation of Research Impact Metrics" in the latest issue of College & Research Libraries News.

Here's an excerpt:

University faculty, administration, librarians, and publishers alike are beginning to discuss how and where altmetrics can be useful towards evaluating a researcher's academic contribution.2 As interest grows, libraries are in a unique position to help facilitate an informed dialogue with the various constituencies that will intersect with altmetrics on campus, including both researchers (students and faculty) and the academic administrative office (faculty affairs, research and grants, promotion and tenure committees, and so on).

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    "The Rich Get Richer and the Poor Get Poorer: The Effect of Open Access on Cites to Science Journals Across the Quality Spectrum"

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on June 3rd, 2013

    Mark J. McCabe and Christopher M. Snyder have self-archived "The Rich Get Richer and the Poor Get Poorer: The Effect of Open Access on Cites to Science Journals Across the Quality Spectrum" in SSRN.

    Here's an excerpt:

    An open-access journal allows free online access to its articles, obtaining revenue from fees charged to submitting authors. Using panel data on science journals, we are able to circumvent some problems plaguing previous studies of the impact of open access on citations. We find that moving from paid to open access increases cites by 8% on average in our sample, but the effect varies across the quality of content. Open access increases cites to the best content (top-ranked journals or articles in upper quintiles of citations within a volume) but reduces cites to lower-quality content. We construct a model to explain these findings in which being placed on a broad open-access platform can increase the competition among articles for readers' attention. We can find structural parameters allowing the model to fit the quintile results quite closely.

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      "Trends in Image Use by Historians and the Implications for Librarians and Archivists"

      Posted in Digitization, Scholarly Communication on May 9th, 2013

      Valerie Harris and Peter Hepburn have published "Trends in Image Use by Historians and the Implications for Librarians and Archivists" in the latest issue of College & Research Libraries.

      Here's an excerpt:

      For years, libraries have offered reproduction services to users, with historians being the core audience. More recently, archives and special collections have developed digitization programs to make primary sources widely available through the Internet. The authors tracked image use from 2000 through 2009 in journals from the discipline of history to discover whether use of images has increased with the growing availability of digital images through libraries, or from social media sites such as Flickr. The study discusses the results, which show no increase in the inclusion of images in the literature, and the implications for librarians and archivists.

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        Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog (April 30, 2013)

        Posted in Digital Scholarship Publications, Scholarly Communication on May 1st, 2013

        The latest bimonthly update of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog is now available. It provides information about selected new works related to scholarly electronic publishing, such as books, e-prints, journal articles, technical reports, and white papers.

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          DigitalCurationNews (4/29/2013) #digitalpreservation

          Posted in Scholarly Communication on April 29th, 2013

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            Current News: DigitalKoans Twitter Updates for 4/26/2013

            Posted in Scholarly Communication on April 26th, 2013

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              "Designing the W3C Open Annotation Data Model"

              Posted in Linking, Linked Data, and Semantic Web, Scholarly Communication on April 26th, 2013

              Robert Sanderson, Paolo Ciccarese, and Herbert Van de Sompel have self-archived "Designing the W3C Open Annotation Data Model" in arXiv.org.

              Here's an excerpt:

              The Open Annotation Core Data Model specifies an interoperable framework for creating associations between related resources, called annotations, using a methodology that conforms to the Architecture of the World Wide Web. Open Annotations can easily be shared between platforms, with sufficient richness of expression to satisfy complex requirements while remaining simple enough to also allow for the most common use cases, such as attaching a piece of text to a single web resource. This paper presents the W3C Open Annotation Community Group specification and the rationale behind the scoping and technical decisions that were made. It also motivates interoperable Annotations via use cases, and provides a brief analysis of the advantages over previous specifications.

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                "House of Commons Oral Evidence Taken before the Business, Innovation And Skills Committee Open Access"

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 25th, 2013

                The UK Parliament has released an uncorrected transcript of "House of Commons Oral Evidence Taken before the Business, Innovation And Skills Committee Open Access."

                Here's an excerpt (below comments by Alicia Wise, Director of Universal Access, Reed Elsevier):

                With the Government's policy that we are all implementing, we will see an increase in the amount of hybrid open-access publishing done at scale. For the open-access components of that hybrid publishing, it is clear that the costs are sustainable through the article-publishing charges. For the subscription part of those titles, the costs continue to need to be covered through the subscription model. If the content is freely available too quickly, there will be no need for libraries to continue to pay those subscription costs. While we have not seen clear evidence of an undermining or cancellation of subscriptions at this point, there is evidence, such as that Audrey referred to, that librarians are watching this space very closely and are very mindful of it. We have also seen that where content is deposited at scale, there can be an erosion of transactional revenues-the pay-per-view business model. Those are very modest components of most of our revenue streams, but again it is a potential early-warning sign.

                See also the video of the session.

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                  "Scholars and Their Blogs: Characteristics, Preferences, and Perceptions Impacting Digital Preservation"

                  Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Scholarly Communication, Social Media/Web 2.0 on April 24th, 2013

                  Carolyn F. Hank has self-archived "Scholars and Their Blogs: Characteristics, Preferences, and Perceptions Impacting Digital Preservation" in the Carolina Digital Repository.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  This descriptive study investigated scholars who blog in the areas of history, economics, law, biology, chemistry and physics, as well as attributes of their respective blogs. It offers an examination of scholars' attitudes and perceptions of their blogs in relation to the system of scholarly communication and their preferences for digital preservation.. . . Most feel their blogs should be preserved for both personal and public access and use into the indefinite, rather than short-term, future. Scholars who blog identify themselves as most responsible for blog preservation. Concerning capability, scholars perceive blog service providers, hosts, and networks as most capable. National and institutional-based libraries and archives, as well as institutional IT departments, are perceived as least responsible and capable for preservation of scholars' respective blogs.

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                    "Digital Scholarship: Exploration of Strategies and Skills for Knowledge Creation and Dissemination"

                    Posted in Scholarly Communication on April 22nd, 2013

                    Cristobal Cobo and Concepcion Naval have self-archived "Digital Scholarship: Exploration of Strategies and Skills for Knowledge Creation and Dissemination" in SSRN.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    Widespread access to digital technologies has enabled digital scholars to access, create, share, and disseminate academic contents in innovative and diversified ways. Today academic teams in different places can collaborate in virtual environments by conducting scholarly work on the Internet. Two relevant dimensions that have been deeply affected by the emergence of digital scholarship are new facets of knowledge generation (wikis, e-science, online education, distributed R&D, open innovation, open science, peer-based production, online encyclopedias, user generated content) and new models of knowledge circulation and distribution (e-journals, open repositories, open licenses, academic podcasting initiatives, etc.). . . . This paper address some of the key challenges and raise a set of recommendations to foster the development of key skills, new models of collaboration and cross-disciplinary cooperation between digital scholars.

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                      Article-Level Metrics—A SPARC Primer

                      Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on April 17th, 2013

                      SPARC has released Article-Level Metrics—A SPARC Primer.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      Article-Level Metrics (ALMs) are rapidly emerging as important tools to quantify how individual articles are being discussed, shared, and used. ALMs can be employed in conjunction with existing metrics, which have traditionally focused on the long-term impact of a collection of articles (i.e., a journal) based on the number of citations generated. This primer is designed to give campus leaders and other interested parties an overview of what ALMs are, why they matter, how they complement established utilities, and how they can be used in the tenure and promotion process.

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                        Ithaka S+R US Faculty Survey 2012

                        Posted in Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries, Scholarly Communication on April 9th, 2013

                        Ithaka S+R has released the Ithaka S+R US Faculty Survey 2012.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        Major topics covered by the survey include:

                        • Research processes: The processes through which scholars perform their research, focusing principally on the use of research materials in secondary and primary research.
                        • Teaching practices: The pedagogical methods that faculty members are adopting and the ways that they draw on content and support services in their teaching.
                        • Scholarly communications:Formal and informal methods by which scholars communicate with each other, the ways in which the types of materials and information exchanged in these processes are evolving, and needs for various kinds of publishing support services.
                        • The library: How faculty members perceive the roles and value of their institutional library, touching on the roles the library plays in supporting many of the above activities.
                        • Scholarly societies:How faculty members perceive the roles and value of their primary scholarly society, including in supporting both formal and informal communications between scholars.

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