Archive for the 'Scholarly Journals' Category

Going for Gold? The Costs and Benefits of Gold Open Access for UK Research Institutions: Further Economic Modelling

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on July 8th, 2012

JISC has released Going for Gold? The Costs and Benefits of Gold Open Access for UK Research Institutions: Further Economic Modelling.

Here's an excerpt:

Based on this analysis, the main findings are:

  • so long as research funders commit to paying publication costs for the research they fund, and
  • publication charges fall to the reprint author's home institution,
  • all research-intensive universities would see the greatest savings, and universities would see savings from (worldwide) Gold OA when article-processing charges are at the current averages,
  • in a transition period, providing Open Access through the Green route offers the greatest economic benefits to individual universities, unless additional funds are made available to cover Gold OA costs

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

Be Sociable, Share!

    League of European Research Universities Releases The LERU Roadmap towards Open Access

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on June 25th, 2012

    The League of European Research Universities has released The LERU Roadmap towards Open Access.

    Here's an excerpt:

    • The idea of Open Access is not new; the first major international statement on Open Access was set out in the Declaration of the Budapest Open Access Initiative in 2002.4 However, 'the pathway' to Open Access is not a smooth one. Many parties are involved and there are many competing interests. There are costs and there are advocates, agnostics and critics. There are gains and impacts which need to be carefully assessed.
    • This Roadmap traverses some of this landscape and aims to assist LERU members who wish to put in place structures, policies and practices to facilitate Open Access. Whilst the Roadmap is primarily intended for LERU members, other European universities may find it useful.

    | Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals | Digital Scholarship |

    Be Sociable, Share!

      First Issue of the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication Published

      Posted in E-Journals, Open Access, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on May 16th, 2012

      The Pacific University Library has published the first issue of the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication, which is an open access journal under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

      Here's an excerpt from the What is in a Name? Introducing the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication:

      The Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication (JLSC) was founded to both recognize and embody this increasingly prominent role of libraries in shaping the future of scholarly communication. Recognize, in that we believe that scholarly communication librarianship has become a core service area for academic libraries, and is deserving of an intellectual home. The increase in seminars, articles and dedicated conferences—like the notable IMLS-funded Library Publishing Services: Strategies for Success10 project—all demonstrate the growing interest in library scholarly communication initiatives, and the need for a dedicated venue for exchange. Embody, in that this is a journal published by an academic library, with an editorial board of library scholar-practitioners, devoted to open, free and flexible communication of knowledge in our field. And in the interest of keeping the channels of communication as open as possible, we also recognize that there are other stakeholders, such as publishers, technologists, and research funders, who play an integral role in determining the future of scholarly communication. Our profession is best served by engaging in honest dialogue with them, and we hope that the work we publish will reflect these types of discussions and collaborations.

      | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography| Digital Scholarship |

      Be Sociable, Share!

        "Data Citation and Publication by NERC’s Environmental Data Centres"

        Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Metadata, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 6th, 2012

        Sarah Callaghan, Roy Lowry, and David Walton have published "Data Citation and Publication by NERC's Environmental Data Centres" in the latest issue of Ariadne.

        Here's an excerpt:

        NERC and their environmental data centres want to ensure that the archived datasets are first-class scientific objects, and that the researchers responsible for creating them receive appropriate recognition for their efforts. NERC have set up the Science Information Strategy (SIS) to provide the framework for NERC to work more closely and effectively with its scientific communities in delivering data and information management services. . . .

        The NERC SIS Data Citation and Publication Project aims to create a way of promoting access to data, while simultaneously providing the data creators with full academic credit for their efforts. We are therefore developing a mechanism for the formal citation of datasets held in the NERC data centres, and are working with academic journal publishers to develop a method for the peer review and formal publication of datasets.

        | Research Data Curation Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

        Be Sociable, Share!

          Benefits of Open Access to Scholarly Research for Voluntary and Charitable Sector Organisations

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 3rd, 2012

          JISC has released Benefits of Open Access to Scholarly Research for Voluntary and Charitable Sector Organisations.

          Here's an excerpt:

          We have learned in this study that the voluntary and charitable sector has an appetite and need for scholarly research that it cannot currently satisfy. The organisations contributing to the study have described the importance of research to the voluntary and charitable sector's commitment to playing its very distinctive role in the most effective way it can. In scoping interviews, case studies and survey responses, VCOs have identified a consistent set of barriers to accessing research. They have shown too that they are creative and resourceful, finding ways to overcome these barriers some of which might place them on or over the border of copyright infringement. We do not think that VCOs should be put in the position of having to choose between what is legally permitted and what they feel is ethically required of them in order to fulfil their charitable objectives. We think too that if the VCS is being asked to expand its role and play an increasing part in delivering public services, then access to research is essential. In this final chapter, we provide some recommendations which, we hope, will go some way to widening the voluntary and charitable sector's access to scholarly research outputs.

          | Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals: This is an excellent resource for its extensive background documentation of the open access arguments and issues. — Ann Jensen, Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, no. 43 (2005) | Digital Scholarship |

          Be Sociable, Share!

            Benefits of Open Access to Scholarly Research to the Public Sector

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 3rd, 2012

            JISC has released Benefits of Open Access to Scholarly Research to the Public Sector.

            Here's an excerpt:

            The total cost to the public sector of accessing journal papers is around £135 million per annum. The savings that accrue from the availability of Open Access articles (using both Green and Gold routes) amount to £28.6 million (£26 million in access fees and £2.6 million in time savings).

            Extending the number or articles available through Open Access further increases the potential for savings. Each extra 5% of journal papers accessed via Open Access would save the public sector £1.7 million, even if no subscription fees were to be saved. Increasing the number of journal papers accessed through Open Access to 25% would save the public sector an extra £29 million.

            | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: "This work gives an outstanding overview of scholarship relating to the growing Open Access movement." — George Machovec, The Charleston Advisor 12, no. 2 (2010): 3. | Digital Scholarship |

            Be Sociable, Share!

              "Fully Digital: Policy and Process Implications for the AAS"

              Posted in E-Journals, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 1st, 2012

              Chris Biemesderfer has self-archived "Fully Digital: Policy and Process Implications for the AAS" in arXiv.org.

              Here's an excerpt:

              In the near term, we anticipate that enterprise-scale printing will be phased out in the next 2-3 years, as the library subscribers to the journals stop acquiring the print products. We are going to be looking to web-to-print solutions so that customized print products can be specified by the customers themselves, thus allowing the AAS to focus on the larger issues of professional scholarly communication. In the meantime, we are thinking about a business model for the Society that offers only online subscriptions, and we are preparing to charge authors in 2011 based on the quantities of digital material that are submitted, rather than based on the number of typeset pages of the authors' text.

              | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

              Be Sociable, Share!

                MIT Establishes Open Access Working Group in Response to Elsevier’s New Article Posting Policies

                Posted in Author Rights, Open Access, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 25th, 2012

                MIT has established an Open Access Working Group in response to Elsevier's new article posting policies.

                Here's an excerpt from the "New Open Access Working Group Formed: Formulating Response to Elsevier's Policy Change":

                The wording [of the Elsevier posting policy] is very unclear; no one is quite sure what a "systematic posting mandate" is. Duke, for one, who has an open access policy very much like ours, has concluded that such policies aren't "mandates" since they allow people to opt out, and hence that they are not covered by the new Elsevier posting policy. But it is clear that Elsevier is trying to do what it can to undermine such policies, and to confuse faculty about what they are and are not allowed to do. Certainly that is the interpretation of the Coalition for Open Access Repositories, who, in their response, "strongly oppose the changes made by Elsevier to its article posting policies" and "join the research community in condemning Elsevier for its recent business practices and lobbying that undermine policies and activities promoting open access to scholarly literature."

                | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography| Digital Scholarship |

                Be Sociable, Share!

                  Page 20 of 51« First...10...1819202122...304050...Last »

                  DigitalKoans

                  DigitalKoans

                  Digital Scholarship

                  Copyright © 2005-2014 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

                  Creative Commons License

                  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.