Archive for the 'Scholarly Journals' Category

Open Access Status of Journal Articles from ERC-Funded Projects

Posted in Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on July 17th, 2012

The European Research Council has released Open Access Status of Journal Articles from ERC-Funded Projects.

Here's an excerpt:

The main objective of this analysis is to estimate the extent to which journal articles from ERC funded projects are available in an open access. . . .

The results show that 62 % of journal articles from ERC funded projects are available in open access. The share of articles in open access varies across research domains. It is close to 70 % in Life Sciences, 65 % in Physical Sciences and Engineering and nearer 50 % in Social Sciences and Humanities. A comparison with the data on open access status provided by the grant holders in their mid-term reports shows that self-reporting leads to an underestimation of the proportion of open access articles.

| Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals | Digital Scholarship |

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    After UK’s RCUK Policy, European Commission Announces Another Major Open Access Policy

    Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 17th, 2012

    Yesterday DigitalKoans reported on the Research Councils UK's new open access policy. Today, the European Commission has announced another major open access policy.

    Here's an excerpt from the press release:

    The European Commission today outlined measures to improve access to scientific information produced in Europe. Broader and more rapid access to scientific papers and data will make it easier for researchers and businesses to build on the findings of public-funded research. This will boost Europe's innovation capacity and give citizens quicker access to the benefits of scientific discoveries. In this way, it will give Europe a better return on its €87 billion annual investment in R&D. The measures complement the Commission's Communication to achieve a European Research Area (ERA), also adopted today.

    As a first step, the Commission will make open access to scientific publications a general principle of Horizon 2020, the EU's Research & Innovation funding programme for 2014-2020. As of 2014, all articles produced with funding from Horizon 2020 will have to be accessible:

    • articles will either immediately be made accessible online by the publisher ('Gold' open access)—up-front publication costs can be eligible for reimbursement by the European Commission; or
    • researchers will make their articles available through an open access repository no later than six months (12 months for articles in the fields of social sciences and humanities) after publication ('Green' open access).

    The Commission has also recommended that Member States take a similar approach to the results of research funded under their own domestic programmes. The goal is for 60% of European publicly-funded research articles to be available under open access by 2016.

    The Commission will also start experimenting with open access to the data collected during publicly funded research (e.g. the numerical results of experiments), taking into account legitimate concerns related to the fundee's commercial interests or to privacy.

    | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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      "Government Response to the Finch Group Report: ‘Accessibility, Sustainability, Excellence: How to Expand Access to Research Publications’"

      Posted in Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 16th, 2012

      David Willetts, the UK Minister for Science and Universities, has issued "Government Response to the Finch Group Report: 'Accessibility, Sustainability, Excellence: How to Expand Access to Research Publications'."

      Here's an excerpt:

      The Government has listened carefully to what publishers, learned societies and the Finch Group collectively have had to say on this issue. We prefer the 'gold' over the 'green' model, especially where the research is taxpayer funded so the Government agrees with the sentiment expressed in the Finch Report. Embargo periods allowed by funding bodies for publishers should be short where publishers have chosen not to take up the preferred option of their receiving an Article Processing Charge (which provides payment in full for immediate publication by the 'gold OA' route). Where APC funds are not available to the publisher or learned society, for the publication of publicly-funded research, then publishers could reasonably insist on a longer more equitable embargo period. This could be up to 12 months for science, technology and engineering publications and longer for publications in those disciplines which require more time to secure payback. Even so, publications with embargo periods longer than two years may find it difficult to argue that they are also serving the public interest.

      | Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals | Digital Scholarship |

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        Research Councils UK Adopts New Open Access Policy

        Posted in Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 16th, 2012

        The Research Councils UK has adopted a new open access policy.

        Here's an excerpt from the press release:

        Research Councils UK (RCUK) has today, 16th July 2012, unveiled its new Open Access policy. Informed by the work of the National Working Group on Expanding Access to Published Research Findings, chaired by Professor Dame Janet Finch, the policy at once harmonises and makes significant changes to existing Research Councils' Open Access policies. . . .

        The new policy, which will apply to all qualifying publications being submitted for publication from 1 April 2013, states that peer reviewed research papers which result from research that is wholly or partially funded by the Research Councils:

        • must be published in journals which are compliant with Research Council policy on Open Access, and;
        • must include details of the funding that supported the research, and a statement on how the underlying research materials such as data, samples or models can be accessed.

        Criteria which journals must fulfill to be compliant with the Research Councils' Open Access policy are detailed within the policy, but include offering a 'pay to publish'; option or allowing deposit in a subject or institutional repository after a mandated maximum embargo period. In addition, the policy mandates use of 'CC-BY', the Creative Commons 'Attribution' license, when an APC is levied. The CC_BY licence allows others to modify, build upon and/or distribute the licensed work (including for commercial purposes) as long as the original author is credited.

        The Research Councils will provide block grants to eligible UK Higher Education Institutions, approved independent research organisations and Research Council Institutes to support payment of the Article Processing Charges (APCs) associated with 'pay-to-publish'. In parallel, eligible organisations will be expected to set-up and manage their own publication funds. The Research Councils will work with eligible organisations to discuss the detail of the new approach to funding APCs and to ensure that appropriate and auditable mechanisms are put in place to manage the funds.

        Along with HEFCE and other relevant Funding Bodies, we shall monitor these policies actively, both to review their effects and to ensure that our joint objectives on Open Access are being met.

        | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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          "Multi-Stage Open Peer Review: Scientific Evaluation Integrating the Strengths of Traditional Peer Review with the Virtues of Transparency and Self-Regulation"

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on July 15th, 2012

          Ulrich Pöschl has published "Multi-Stage Open Peer Review: Scientific Evaluation Integrating the Strengths of Traditional Peer Review with the Virtues of Transparency and Self-Regulation" in Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience.

          Here's an excerpt:

          The traditional forms of scientific publishing and peer review do not live up to all demands of efficient communication and quality assurance in today's highly diverse and rapidly evolving world of science. They need to be advanced and complemented by interactive and transparent forms of review, publication, and discussion that are open to the scientific community and to the public. The advantages of open access, public peer review, and interactive discussion can be efficiently and flexibly combined with the strengths of traditional scientific peer review.

          | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

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            Going for Gold? The Costs and Benefits of Gold Open Access for UK Research Institutions: Further Economic Modelling

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on July 8th, 2012

            JISC has released Going for Gold? The Costs and Benefits of Gold Open Access for UK Research Institutions: Further Economic Modelling.

            Here's an excerpt:

            Based on this analysis, the main findings are:

            • so long as research funders commit to paying publication costs for the research they fund, and
            • publication charges fall to the reprint author's home institution,
            • all research-intensive universities would see the greatest savings, and universities would see savings from (worldwide) Gold OA when article-processing charges are at the current averages,
            • in a transition period, providing Open Access through the Green route offers the greatest economic benefits to individual universities, unless additional funds are made available to cover Gold OA costs

            | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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              League of European Research Universities Releases The LERU Roadmap towards Open Access

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on June 25th, 2012

              The League of European Research Universities has released The LERU Roadmap towards Open Access.

              Here's an excerpt:

              • The idea of Open Access is not new; the first major international statement on Open Access was set out in the Declaration of the Budapest Open Access Initiative in 2002.4 However, 'the pathway' to Open Access is not a smooth one. Many parties are involved and there are many competing interests. There are costs and there are advocates, agnostics and critics. There are gains and impacts which need to be carefully assessed.
              • This Roadmap traverses some of this landscape and aims to assist LERU members who wish to put in place structures, policies and practices to facilitate Open Access. Whilst the Roadmap is primarily intended for LERU members, other European universities may find it useful.

              | Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals | Digital Scholarship |

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                First Issue of the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication Published

                Posted in E-Journals, Open Access, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on May 16th, 2012

                The Pacific University Library has published the first issue of the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication, which is an open access journal under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

                Here's an excerpt from the What is in a Name? Introducing the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication:

                The Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication (JLSC) was founded to both recognize and embody this increasingly prominent role of libraries in shaping the future of scholarly communication. Recognize, in that we believe that scholarly communication librarianship has become a core service area for academic libraries, and is deserving of an intellectual home. The increase in seminars, articles and dedicated conferences—like the notable IMLS-funded Library Publishing Services: Strategies for Success10 project—all demonstrate the growing interest in library scholarly communication initiatives, and the need for a dedicated venue for exchange. Embody, in that this is a journal published by an academic library, with an editorial board of library scholar-practitioners, devoted to open, free and flexible communication of knowledge in our field. And in the interest of keeping the channels of communication as open as possible, we also recognize that there are other stakeholders, such as publishers, technologists, and research funders, who play an integral role in determining the future of scholarly communication. Our profession is best served by engaging in honest dialogue with them, and we hope that the work we publish will reflect these types of discussions and collaborations.

                | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography| Digital Scholarship |

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