Archive for the 'Scholarly Journals' Category

SAS Open Journals: Final Report

Posted in Open Access, Scholarly Journals on March 8th, 2012

Peter Webster has self-archived SAS Open Journals: Final Report in SAS-Space

Here's an excerpt:

The culture of open access journal publishing is not yet well established amongst the smaller arts and humanities journals which we intend to engage in this project in the longer term. However, as the business model for this type of small self-published journal comes under increasing pressure, SAS Open Journals now offers a lowcost solution. . . .

The project developed a re-usable overlay journal interface, using Amicus Curiae as the exemplar, thus completing the transition of that journal from print to web. This system is now available, at minimal cost, to journals produced within the School, and to publications by cognate learned societies. The system will greatly increase open access publishing capacity in the humanities and social sciences, and further fulfil the School's RPF mission. To date, two further journals have committed themselves to using SAS Open Journals.

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography| Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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    "Scholarly Communication Strategies in Latin America’s Research-Intensive Universities"

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 7th, 2012

    Juan Pablo Alperin, Gustavo E. Fischman, and John Willinsky have self-archived "Scholarly Communication Strategies in Latin America's Research-Intensive Universities" in the SUSE Open Archive.

    Here's an excerpt:

    Open Access—scholarship that is "digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions" (Suber, 2011)—has dramatically changed the research landscape in universities worldwide in the twenty-first century. In Latin America, regional Open Access initiatives (if not officially labeled "open access") have permeated most research-intensive universities and national science evaluation systems and have begun to alter the way that local research is perceived. Furthermore, the prominence of Open Access, regionally and globally, has become a significant force in transforming previous traditions and systems used by universities in Latin America in the production and access to scientific knowledge, having a profound influence on its position within what might be thought of as the global knowledge exchange.

    | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography| Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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      LITA Publishes First Open Access Issue of Information Technology and Libraries

      Posted in E-Journals, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 6th, 2012

      The Library Information Technology Association has published the first open access issue of Information Technology and Libraries under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

      Here's an excerpt from the "Editor's Comments":

      Welcome to the first issue of Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL) as an open-access, e-only publication. As announced to LITA members in early January, this change in publishing model will help ensure the long-term viability of ITAL by making it more accessible, more current, more relevant, and more environmentally friendly. ITAL will continue to feature high-quality articles that have undergone a rigorous peer-review process, but it will also begin expanding content to include more case studies, commentary, and information about topics and trends of interest to the LITA community and beyond. Look for a new scope statement for ITAL shortly.

      Of special interest to DigitalKoans readers is Abigail J. McDermott's "Copyright: Regulation Out of Line with Our Digital Reality?" article.

      | Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals | Digital Scholarship |

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        SURF’s EJME Project Releases Data File Plug-ins for Open Journal Systems

        Posted in E-Journals, Open Science, Open Source Software, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 21st, 2012

        SURF's EJME (Enhanced Journals…Made Easy!) Project has released data file plug-ins for Open Journal Systems.

        Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

        The Internet makes it possible to present publications in combination with related research data, as Enhanced Publications. The Enhanced Journals…Made Easy project (EJME), which is funded by SURF, has designed a practical work process for publishers of Open Access journals so as to enhance academic journals with the associated data files. The project involved the development of two plug-ins for Open Journal Systems, a system for managing and publishing journals. Open Journal Systems (OJS) is the most frequently used open source package worldwide for academic journals.

        | Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

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          Journal of eScience Librarianship Launched

          Posted in Cyberinfrastructure/E-Science, E-Journals, Libraries, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 20th, 2012

          The Lamar Soutter Library has launched the Journal of eScience Librarianship.

          The first issue's "full-length papers" are:

          | E-science and Academic Libraries Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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            Journal of Digital Humanities to Launch in March

            Posted in Digital Humanities, E-Journals, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 15th, 2012

            The Journal of Digital Humanities will launch this March.

            Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

            Digital Humanities Now is pleased to announce the Journal of Digital Humanities (ISSN 2165-6673), forthcoming in March 2012. In this comprehensive, peer-reviewed journal we will feature the best scholarship, projects, and tools produced by the digital humanities community in the previous quarter.

            The Journal of Digital Humanities will offer expanded coverage of the digital humanities in three ways. First, we publish scholarly work beyond the traditional research article. Second, we select content from open and public discussions in the field. Third, we encourage continued discussion through peer-to-peer review.

            The journal will be comprised of individual works that were selected as Editors' Choice in Digital Humanities Now. These works range from written texts, to visual arguments, to audio-visual presentations. In order to promote the peer review of non-traditional scholarship, each issue will include solicited reviews of digital tools. When the community focuses extensively on a particular topic, a special section of the issue will feature the broader conversation. In our inaugural issue, Natalia Cecire, a postdoctoral fellow at the Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry at Emory University, will introduce and guest edit a special section about theory and the digital humanities.

            | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, Version 80 | Digital Scholarship |

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              "A Study of Open Access Journals Using Article Processing Charges"

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 15th, 2012

              David J. Solomon and Bo-Christer Björk have self-archived "A Study of Open Access Journals Using Article Processing Charges".

              Here's an excerpt:

              Article Processing Charges (APCs) are a central mechanism for funding Open Access (OA) scholarly publishing. We studied the APCs charged and article volumes of journals that were listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals as charging APCs. These included 1,370 journals that published 100,697 articles in 2010. The average APC was 906 US Dollars (USD) calculated over journals and 904 US Dollars USD calculated over articles. The price range varied between 8 and 3,900 USD, with the lowest prices charged by journals published in developing countries and the highest by journals with high impact factors from major international publishers. Journals in Biomedicine represent 59% of the sample and 58% of the total article volume. They also had the highest APCs of any discipline. Professionally published journals, both for profit and nonprofit had substantially higher APCs than society, university or scholar/researcher published journals. These price estimates are lower than some previous studies of OA publishing and much lower than is generally charged by subscription publishers making individual articles open access in what are termed hybrid journals.

              | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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                Access to Scholarly Content: Gaps and Barriers

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on February 5th, 2012

                The Research Information Network has released Access to Scholarly Content: Gaps and Barriers.

                Here's an excerpt:

                The overall aim of this study is to investigate and quantify the extent to which members of different communities in the UK can gain ready access to formally-published scholarly literature, in particular journal articles and conference proceedings. . . .

                Much of the information presented here is based on an online survey of researchers and knowledge workers from UK universities and colleges, medical schools and health providers, industry and commerce, and research institutes. . . .

                Other information in this report comes from a detailed analysis of the literature and secondary data analysis of the Labour Force Survey in an attempt to quantify the size of the UK professional knowledge worker sector.

                | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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                  "The Five Stars of Online Journal Articles— A Framework for Article Evaluation"

                  Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals on January 18th, 2012

                  David Shotton has published "The Five Stars of Online Journal Articles— A Framework for Article Evaluation" in the latest issue of D-Lib Magazine.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  I propose five factors—peer review, open access, enriched content, available datasets and machine-readable metadata—as the Five Stars of Online Journal Articles, a constellation of five independent criteria within a multi-dimensional publishing universe against which online journal articles can be evaluated, to see how well they match up with current visions for enhanced research communications. Achievement along each of these publishing axes can vary, analogous to the different stars within the constellation shining with varying luminosities. I suggest a five-point scale for each, by which a journal article can be evaluated, and provide diagrammatic representations for such evaluations. While the criteria adopted for these scales are somewhat arbitrary, and while the rating of a particular article on each axis may involve elements of subjective judgment, these Five Stars of Online Journal Articles provide a conceptual framework by which to judge the degree to which any article achieves or falls short of the ideal, which should be useful to authors, editors and publishers. I exemplify such evaluations using my own recent publications of relevance to semantic publishing.

                  | E-science and Academic Libraries Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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                    "Open Access Journals from Society Publishers"

                    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on December 5th, 2011

                    Peter Suber has published "Open Access Journals from Society Publishers" in the latest issue of the SPARC Open Access Newsletter.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    How many scholarly societies publish OA journals, and how many OA journals do they publish? Four years ago (November 2007), Caroline Sutton and I released the first edition of our inventory answering those questions, and today we release the second edition.

                    Cutting to the chase: Our 2007 list turned up 425 societies publishing 450 full or non-hybrid OA journals. Our 2011 list shows 530 societies publishing 616 full OA journals. . . .

                    In 2007, only 15 (3%) society OA journals used CC licenses. In 2011, 92 (15%) do so, a small fraction but a distinct improvement. An additional 45 journals (7%) let authors retain copyright but do not publish under open licenses. Despite the improvement from four years ago, these are deeply disappointing numbers. As of last week (November 25, 2011) 1,727 or 24% of all the OA journals listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals used CC licenses. Hence, society OA journals use CC licenses at an even lower rate than OA journals in general.

                    | Digital Scholarship's Digital/Print Books | Digital Scholarship |

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                      Royal Society Makes Journal Articles Published More Than 70 Years Ago Open Access

                      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on October 26th, 2011

                      The Royal Society has made journal articles published more than 70 years ago open access.

                      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                      The Royal Society has today announced that its world-famous historical journal archive—which includes the first ever peer-reviewed scientific journal—has been made permanently free to access online.

                      Around 60,000 historical scientific papers are accessible via a fully searchable online archive, with papers published more than 70 years ago now becoming freely available.

                      The Royal Society is the world's oldest scientific publisher, with the first edition of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society appearing in 1665. . . .

                      The move is being made as part of the Royal Society's ongoing commitment to open access in scientific publishing. Opening of the archive is being timed to coincide with Open Access Week, and also comes soon after the Royal Society announced its first ever fully open access journal, Open Biology.

                      | Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals | Digital Scholarship |

                      Digital Scholarship |

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                        Journal Article Mining: A Research Study into Practices, Policies, Plans. . . and Promises

                        Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 15th, 2011

                        The Publishing Research Consortium has released Journal Article Mining: A Research Study into Practices, Policies, Plans. . . and Promises.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        This study, carried out between February and May 2011, aims to provide an overview of current practices, players, policies, plans and expectations for text mining and data mining of content in academic journals. The research consisted of a series of 29 interviews with experts and people working on content mining and was concluded by a survey among scholarly publishers.

                        | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 |

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