Archive for the 'Scholarly Journals' Category

Science-Metrix Releases Three Reports on Open Access

Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 22nd, 2013

Science-Metrix has released three reports on open access: Proportion of Open Access Peer-Reviewed Papers at the European and World Levels—2004-2011, Open Data Access Policies and Strategies in the European Research Area and Beyond, and Open Access Strategies in the European Research Area.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The first report measures the availability of scholarly publications in 22 fields of knowledge across the European Research Area, Brazil, Canada, Japan, and the United States, between 2004 and 2011. . . .

The second report, focusing on open access policies, showed a growing trend in the adoption of such policies by governments and other funding bodies. . . .

The third report found that open access to scientific data is less developed and more difficult to implement than open access to scholarly publications, both in terms of policies and infrastructure.

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    "A Framework for Systematic Analysis of Open Access Journals and its Application in Software Engineering and Information Systems"

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 22nd, 2013

    Daniel Graziotin, Xiaofeng Wang, and Pekka Abrahamsson have self-archived "A Framework for Systematic Analysis of Open Access Journals and its Application in Software Engineering and Information Systems" in arXiv.org.

    Here's an excerpt:

    This study empirically demonstrated that high publication charges are not sufficiently justified by the publishers, which often lack transparency and may prevent authors from adopting Open Access. It showed that there are no features provided by journals with publication fees, which are not offered by those not requiring charges to authors. The article warned the authors to investigate which agreements have been signed by the journal publisher in order to ensure visibility to accepted papers. It also raised important concerns like that the articles of three fourths of Open Access journals in Software Engineering and Information Systems may be in danger of disappearing if the journals lose their content. Last but not least, this study showed that Open Access journals and publishers in the fields of Software Engineering and Information Systems have a significant margin of improvement regarding the perceived trustworthiness.

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      e-InfraNet: ‘Open’ as the Default Modus Operandi for Research and Higher Education

      Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on August 21st, 2013

      The the e-InfraNet project has released e-InfraNet: 'Open' as the Default Modus Operandi for Research and Higher Education.

      Here's an excerpt:

      The basis for the policy framework is an overview of the current 'Open' landscape outlining contexts, drivers, achievements and effects of the various 'opens', as well as a number of common issues. Because of this commonality, coordinating the vision and approach can benefit all 'opens' individually, and contribute to the development of 'Open' as the default modus operandi for the research and higher education sectors. A pragmatic approach to the implementation of the vision will ensure the necessary flexibility to adjust for the diversity in the various 'opens' themselves and in their geographic and disciplinary contexts.

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        "Correlation between Article Download and Citation Figures for Highly Accessed Articles from Five Open Access Oncology Journals"

        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on July 16th, 2013

        Carsten Nieder, Astrid Dalhaug, and Gro Aandahl have published "Correlation between Article Download and Citation Figures for Highly Accessed Articles from Five Open Access Oncology Journals" in SpringerPlus.

        Here's an excerpt:

        Different approaches can be chosen to quantify the impact and merits of scientific oncology publications. These include source of publication (including journal reputation and impact factor), whether or not articles are cited by others, and access/download figures. When relying on citation counts, one needs to obtain access to citation databases and has to consider that results differ from one database to another. Accumulation of citations takes time and their dynamics might differ from journal to journal and topic to topic. Therefore, we wanted to evaluate the correlation between citation and download figures, hypothesising that articles with fewer downloads also accumulate fewer citations. Typically, publishers provide download figures together with the article. We extracted and analysed the 50 most viewed articles from 5 different open access oncology journals. For each of the 5 journals and also all journals combined, correlation between number of accesses and citations was limited (r=0.01-0.30). Considerable variations were also observed when analyses were restricted to specific article types such as reviews only (r=0.21) or case reports only (r=0.53). Even if year of publication was taken into account, high correlation coefficients were the exception from the rule. In conclusion, downloads are not a universal surrogate for citation figures.

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          "The Characteristics of Journal Editorial Boards in Library and Information Science"

          Posted in Libraries, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 12th, 2013

          Peter Willett has published "The Characteristics of Journal Editorial Boards in Library and Information Science" in the latest issue of the International Journal of Knowledge Content Development & Technology.

          Here's an excerpt:

          A study of the members of the editorial boards of 16 leading LIS journals shows that the boards vary markedly in size, in diversity (in terms of both gender and nationality) and in the experience and publication/citation profiles (based on Web of Science data) of their board-members. A typical editorial board member will be male, work in the USA, have published their first LIS article in 1995, and have 9.5 publications and 39 non-self citations to those publications, with the publication/citation profiles differing significantly from those of non-board-member contributors to the 16 journals

          .

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            "Do Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences and Humanities? Findings from a 2011 Survey of Academic Publishers"

            Posted in Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs), Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on July 11th, 2013

            Marisa L. Ramirez et al. have published "Do Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences and Humanities? Findings from a 2011 Survey of Academic Publishers" in the latest issue of College & Research Libraries.

            Here's an excerpt:

            An increasing number of higher education institutions worldwide are requiring submission of electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) by graduate students and are subsequently providing open access to these works in online repositories. Faculty advisors and graduate students are concerned that such unfettered access to their work could diminish future publishing opportunities. This study investigated social sciences, arts, and humanities journal editors' and university press directors' attitudes toward ETDs. The findings indicate that manuscripts that are revisions of openly accessible ETDs are always welcome for submission or considered on a case-by-case basis by 82.8 percent of journal editors and 53.7 percent of university press directors polled.

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              "How Institutionalized Are Model License Use Terms? An Analysis of E-Journal License Use Rights Clauses from 2000 to 2009"

              Posted in Electronic Resources, Licenses, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 11th, 2013

              Kristin R. Eschenfelder, Tien-I Tsai, Xiaohua Zhu and Brenton Stewart have published "How Institutionalized Are Model License Use Terms? An Analysis of E-Journal License Use Rights Clauses from 2000 to 2009" in the latest issue of College & Research Libraries.

              Here's an excerpt:

              This paper explored the degree to which use terms proposed by model licenses have become institutionalized across different publishers' licenses. It examined model license use terms in four areas: downloading, scholarly sharing, interlibrary loan, and electronic reserves. Data collection and analysis involved content analysis of 224 electronic journal licenses spanning 2000-2009. Analysis examined how use terms changed over time, differences between consortia and site license use terms and differences between commercial and noncommercial publisher license use terms. Results suggest that some model license use terms have become institutionalized while others have not. Use terms with higher institutionalization included: allowing ILL, permitting secure e-transmission for ILL, allowing e-reserves with no special permissions, and not requiring deletion of e-reserves files. Scholarly sharing showed lower institutionalization with most publishers not including scholarly sharing allowances. Other use terms showing low institutionalization included: recommendations to avoid printing requirements related to ILL and recommendations to allow hyperlinks for e-reserves. The results provide insight into the range of use terms commonly employed in e-journal licenses.

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                Debating Open Access

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 10th, 2013

                The British Academy has released Debating Open Access.

                Here's an excerpt:

                We decided at an early stage when thinking about putting these papers together, in January 2013, that we needed to have as contributors people who thought open access was a good thing, the way forward; people who thought it was a good thing but fraught with practical problems which were ill-understood by some of its advocates; and people who thought it was a bad thing in principle. This is what we have indeed commissioned. We have not got the full spectrum of views about open access, for sure, which would have required very many more articles . . .There is also diversity in the contributors: academics and publishers, representatives of learned societies, natural and social scientists as well as historians and literary critics, although the important perspective of university librarians is one that is missing.

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                  "Publishers and Universities Respond to the OSTP Mandate"

                  Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 8th, 2013

                  Denise Troll Covey has self-archived "Publishers and Universities Respond to the OSTP Mandate" in SelectedWorks.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  Brief summary and comparison of the Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States (CHORUS) announced by the Association of American Publishers and the Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE) announced by the American Association of Universities, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, and Association of Research Libraries.

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                    "Linking Information Seeking Patterns with Purpose, Use, Value, and Return on Investment of Academic Library Journals"

                    Posted in Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on June 24th, 2013

                    Donald W. King and Carol Tenopir have published "Linking Information Seeking Patterns with Purpose, Use, Value, and Return on Investment of Academic Library Journals" in the latest issue of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    The emphasis of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship of how purposes of reading scholarly journals (e.g., research, teaching, current awareness, etc.) lead to the information seeking patterns used by them (e.g., how they identify articles that are read, where they obtain them, etc.), which dictates certain aspects of use (e.g., how much is read, age of articles read, format of the articles, etc.), which is related to the positive outcomes or value of reading (e.g., increased productivity, improved research or teaching, saving readers' time or money, etc.), which serves as return components of the ROI of academic library journal collections.

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                      "Data Management in Scholarly Journals and Possible Roles for Libraries—Some Insights from EDaWaX"

                      Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 24th, 2013

                      Sven Vlaeminck has published "Data Management in Scholarly Journals and Possible Roles for Libraries—Some Insights from EDaWaX" in the latest issue of LIBER Quarterly.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      In this paper we summarize the findings of an empirical study conducted by the EDaWaX-Project. 141 economics journals were examined regarding the quality and extent of data availability policies that should support replications of published empirical results in economics. This paper suggests criteria for such policies that aim to facilitate replications. These criteria were also used for analysing the data availability policies we found in our sample and to identify best practices for data policies of scholarly journals in economics. In addition, we also evaluated the journals' data archives and checked the percentage of articles associated with research data. To conclude, an appraisal as to how scientific libraries might support the linkage of publications to underlying research data in cooperation with researchers, editors, publishers and data centres is presented.

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                        British Library and Portico Collaborate on E-journal Preservation

                        Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, E-Journals, Scholarly Journals on June 20th, 2013

                        British Library and Portico will collaborate on preserving the Library's e-journal collection.

                        Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                        The partnership will help the British Library—along with five other legal deposit libraries—to meet regulations that recently became law in the United Kingdom and that extend the practice of legal deposit from traditional print publications to non-print publications such as e-journals, blogs and websites in the UK web domain.

                        Portico will utilize its established workflow and processes to create standardized and uniform journal content that can be exported to the British Library. They have started with 1,500 journals from three publishers that are already preserving content with Portico. As necessary, Portico will develop new tools for processing additional publisher content.

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