Archive for the 'Scholarly Journals' Category

Open Access: Journal Tendering for Societies: A Brief Guide

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 10th, 2011

The Association for Learning Technology has released Journal Tendering for Societies: A Brief Guide.

Here's an excerpt:

Hundreds of societies publish journals in collaboration with publishers. Some may be considering how and whether to renegotiate or go out to tender. Some may be considering whether they can/should/wish to change the business model of the journal (e.g. by a move to Open Access). Other societies may be considering using an external publisher for the first time. This guide, based on our experience, is written for all of these. . . .

In mid October 2010 we issued a request for proposals (RFP) for a new publisher. We had interest from six publishers who asked questions about our intentions. We then received four proposals: one which offered an Open Access model only, one which offered both Open Access and conventional publishing as discrete alternatives, and two which offered approaches that included an Open Access component. Three of the proposals were from big publishers. After evaluating the proposals, ALT's Trustees decided in December 2010 to make the journal, which has been renamed Research in Learning Technology, a fully Open Access journal with effect from 1st January 2012.

| Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 |

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    Heading for the Open Road: Costs And Benefits of Transitions in Scholarly Communications

    Posted in E-Prints, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on April 7th, 2011

    The Research Information Network has released Heading for the Open Road: Costs And Benefits of Transitions in Scholarly Communications (annexes).

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    This new report investigates the drivers, costs and benefits of potential ways to increase access to scholarly journals. It identifies five different routes for achieving that end over the next five years, and compares and evaluates the benefits as well as the costs and risks for the UK.

    The report suggests that policymakers who are seeking to promote increases in access should encourage the use of existing subject and institutional repositories, but avoid pushing for reductions in embargo periods, which might put at risk the sustainability of the underlying scholarly publishing system. They should also promote and facilitate a transition to open access publishing (Gold open access) while seeking to ensure that the average level of charges for publication does not exceed c.£2000; that the rate in the UK of open access publication is broadly in step with the rate in the rest of the world; and that total payments to journal publishers from UK universities and their funders do not rise as a consequence.

    | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography |

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      "The Costs and Potential Benefits of Alternative Scholarly Publishing Models"

      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on March 22nd, 2011

      John W. Houghton has published "The Costs and Potential Benefits of Alternative Scholarly Publishing Models" in the latest issue of Information Research.

      Here's an excerpt:

      The costs and benefits associated with alternative scholarly publishing models demonstrate that research and research communication are major activities and the costs involved are substantial. Our preliminary analysis of the potential benefits of more open access to research findings suggests that returns to research are also substantial and that different scholarly publishing models might make a material difference to the returns realised as well as the costs faced. It seems likely from this preliminary analysis that more open access could have substantial net benefits in the longer term and, while net benefits may be lower during a transitional period they would be likely to be positive for both open access journal publishing and self-archiving alternatives.

      | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography |

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        College & Research Libraries Becomes Immediate Open Access Journal

        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 20th, 2011

        Joseph J. Branin, Editor of College & Research Libraries, has announced in the journal's current issue that C&RL will "lift its six-month embargo on recently published online articles and become a fully open access journal."

        The announcement is an major step for the Association of College & Research Libraries, bringing its open access advocacy positions and its publication practices into alignment.

        Librarians were pioneers in publishing scholarly "gold" open access journals. The first library open access journal was the The Public-Access Computer Systems Review, established in 1989 with the first issue published in 1990. It was soon followed by LIBRES (1991), Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship (1991), and MC Journal— Journal of Academic Librarianship (1993).

        However, over twenty years later, most scholarly library journals still restrict access to their published PDF and/or HTML articles, although most permit self-archiving of author eprints (they may restrict where the eprints can be self-archived).

        There are some fine exceptions: Ariadne, Code4Lib Journal, D-Lib Magazine, Information Research: An International Electronic Journal, the International Journal of Digital Curation, the Journal of Digital Information, the Journal of Electronic Publishing, the Journal of the Medical Library Association, Law Library Journal, and LIBER Quarterly come quickly to mind (117 open access library journals are listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals). However, scholarly library journals from most major commercial publishers and library association publishers remain restricted access.

        Consequently, ACRL's decision to go "gold open access" is an important and welcome one. Hopefully, it will encourage other divisions of the American Library Association to follow suit, providing open access to their journals without embargo periods or other access restrictions.

        Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

        On January 10, 2011, the ACRL Board of Directors unanimously passed the following resolution:

        Whereas ACRL supports open scholarship and access to scholarly work;

        Whereas ACRL publishes C&RL, the premier journal for academic librarians; Whereas ACRL has made successive changes to increase access to the research found in C&RL;

        Whereas ACRL member groups support making C&RL an open access journal;

        Be it resolved, that ACRL provide open access to the electronic version of College & Research Libraries journal as of April 2011; and,

        Be it further resolved, that ACRL, through this action, continues to play a leading role in advocating for new models of scholarly communication in all of the disciplines.

        | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Reviews of Digital Scholarship Publications | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography |

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          Author-Pays Open Access Option Using CC-By License Now Available for Many Physical Review Journals

          Posted in Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 16th, 2011

          Authors who publish in many Physical Review journals now have the option to pay an article-processing fee in order to have their articles published as open access articles under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (CC-By License). Two Physical Review journals (Physical Review Special Topics—Accelerators and Beams and Physical Review Special Topics—Physics Education Research) have been fully converted to open access under the CC-By License. The APS announced a new open access journal in January, Physical Review X.

          Here's an excerpt from the press release:

          The new article-processing charges, which will cover all costs and provide a sustainable funding model, have been set at $1700 for papers in the Physical Review and $2700 for those in Physical Review Letters. The resulting open access articles will appear alongside and mixed in with subscription-funded articles, converting these journals into "hybrid" open access journals.

          "The most selective of our journals must have higher article-processing charges for their open access articles," said Gene Sprouse, APS Editor in Chief. "Physical Review accepts about 60% of articles submitted and Physical Review Letters roughly 25%, so the costs are higher than in less selective journals."

          Revenue from the article-processing charges will decrease the need for subscription income and help to keep the APS subscription price-per-article among the lowest of any physics journals. "We'd like to reduce the pressure on library subscriptions, while opening access more widely. Article-processing charges are a means to accomplish both," said Joseph Serene, APS Treasurer/Publisher.

          | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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            "The Durham Statement Two Years Later: Open Access in the Law School Journal Environment"

            Posted in Open Access, Scholarly Journals on February 15th, 2011

            Richard A. Danner, Kelly Leong, and Wayne V. Miller have published "The Durham Statement Two Years Later: Open Access in the Law School Journal Environment" in the latest issue of the Law Library Journal.

            Here's an excerpt:

            The Durham Statement on Open Access to Legal Scholarship, drafted by a group of academic law library directors, was promulgated in February 2009. It calls for two things: (1) open access publication of law school–published journals; and (2) an end to print publication of law journals, coupled with a commitment to keeping the electronic versions available in "stable, open, digital formats." The two years since the Statement was issued have seen increased publication of law journals in openly available electronic formats, but little movement toward all-electronic publication. This article discusses the issues raised by the Durham Statement, the current state of law journal publishing, and directions forward.

            | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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              New Journal of Physics Now Includes Video Abstracts

              Posted in Digital Media, Scholarly Journals on February 6th, 2011

              The New Journal of Physics, an open access journal, now includes video abstracts.

              Here's an excerpt from the press release:

              New Journal of Physics (NJP) has today announced the launch of video abstracts as a new integrated content stream that will give all authors the opportunity to go beyond the constraints of the written article to personally present the importance of their work to the journal's global audience.

              Early contributions include videos from the groups of David Wineland, National Institute of Standards and Technology and J. Ignacio Cirac, Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics, talking about scalable ion traps for quantum information processing, and quantum superposition of living organisms. Researchers from more than 25 countries are represented by the videos abstracts that are published today.

              One of the first contributors, Neil Wilson of the University of Warwick, UK, said of the service "We are very excited to have the opportunity to feature a video abstract alongside our NJP article. Embracing the possibilities of online media in this way allows us to present our work as we see it, and helps focus interested readers on what we believe the key points to be. We hope that being able to put faces to names, and visualize some of the research in action, will add a human touch and so help the scientific community to grow closer." His video on the structure and topography of free-standing chemically modified graphene can be viewed at http://iopscience.iop.org/1367-2630/12/12/125010/.

              | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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                Open Access: Report on the Implementation of Open Content Licenses in Developing and Transition Countries

                Posted in Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Digital Repositories, Open Access, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on February 2nd, 2011

                The EIFL-OA advocacy program has released Report on the Implementation of Open Content Licenses in Developing and Transition Countries.

                Here's an excerpt:

                The survey attempted to gather information from a broad spectrum of research institutions in developing and transition countries in order to get a better understanding of the current state of the implementation of open content licenses. We looked at the web sites of 2,489 open access journals and 357 open access repositories from EIFL network countries. And this report highlights the best practices in using open content licenses by open access journals and open access repositories in developing and transition countries.

                Some general findings of the survey:

                Using open content licenses by open access journals:

                • We identified 556 open access journals that are licensed under open content licenses.
                • There are four types of Creative Commons licenses, which are used – the most liberal Creative Commons Attribution license, Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial license, Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike license and the most restrictive Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivative Works license.
                • 94% of the access journals we surveyed are licensed under Creative Commons Attribution license (524 open access journals in Armenia, Bulgaria, China, Egypt, Lithuania, Macedonia, Nigeria, Poland, Russia, South Africa and Thailand).
                • Nine open access journals in China, Russia and South Africa are licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial license.
                • Three open access journals in Ghana, Nigeria and Ukraine are licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike license.
                • And twenty open access journals in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Estonia, Serbia, South Africa, Thailand and Ukraine are licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivative Works license.

                Using open content licenses by open access repositories:

                • We identified nine open access repositories that are licensed under open content licenses.
                • A repository of open educational materials in South Africa is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution license
                • A repository of open educational materials in Kenya is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license.
                • One repository in China, two repositories in Poland and two repositories in Thailand are licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Non-commercial-Share Alike license.
                • A repository in South Africa is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial license.
                • A repository hosted in Argentina is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial No Derivative Works license.
                • Some repositories in Botswana, Poland and South Africa recommend the depositors to use Creative Commons licenses. As a result a number of publications in these repositories are licensed under Creative Commons licenses.

                | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

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                  NISO Will Make Information Standards Quarterly Open Access in 2011

                  Posted in Open Access, Scholarly Journals on December 12th, 2010

                  The National Information Standards Organization has announced that Information Standards Quarterly will become open access in 2011.

                  Here's an excerpt from the press release:

                  "ISQ has undergone a significant transformation over the past three years as it moved from a newsletter to a full-color magazine," states Cynthia Hodgson, NISO Managing Editor. "With the support of a new ISQ Editorial Board and guest content editors, the contributed content has expanded significantly. Our goal with ISQ is to educate and inform our readers on standards, present practical and replicable implementations of standards-based technologies and best practices, and identify areas where standards could help to solve problems."

                  "ISQ provides a unique perspective with its overlapping interests to the library, publisher, and information systems and services audience," explains Todd Carpenter, NISO Managing Director and Publisher of ISQ. "NISO's Board of Directors strongly believes that providing the information in ISQ via open access will enhance the visibility and reach of the work of our community. We also intend to migrate the archives to open access and convert much of the backfile to electronic format."

                  The print version of ISQ will still be available by subscription or free to NISO members who opt-in to receive it in print. This approach, combined with the open access of the electronic version, will reduce the environmental impact and costs of print publishing while increasing the accessibility of the magazine to everyone in the NISO community and in related standards and technology arenas.

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                    Submission Fees—A Tool in the Transition to Open Access?

                    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on December 7th, 2010

                    The Knowledge Exchange has released Submission Fees—A Tool in the Transition to Open Access?

                    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                    The general conclusion of the report bearing the title "Submission Fees—A Tool in the Transition to Open Access?," written by Mark Ware, is that there are benefits to publishers in certain cases to switch to a model in which an author pays a fee when submitting an article. Especially journals with a high rejection rate might be interested in combining submission fees with article processing charges in order to make the transition to open access easier. In certain disciplines, notably economic and finance journals and in some areas of the experimental life sciences, submission fees are already common.

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                      CERN Signs COPE (Compact for Open-Access Publishing Equity)

                      Posted in Open Access, Scholarly Journals on December 5th, 2010

                      CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, has signed the Compact for Open-Access Publishing Equity. CERN is the fourteenth institution to sign COPE.

                      Here's an excerpt from the press release:

                      As a publicly and internationally funded research institution, CERN believes everyone should get access to its results without any financial barrier. The most important tool to implement this vision in the high-energy physics community, which CERN embodies, is the SCOAP3 initiative, through which CERN and partners in over twenty countries are working to convert to open access existing high-quality high-energy physics journals. While waiting for SCOAP3 to be operational CERN and leading publishers in the field (the American Physical Society, Elsevier, SISSA, and Springer) have reached agreements to make the scientific publications from the flagship Large Hadron Collider available open access and under a Creative Common license, as suggested by the publication policy of the CERN Physics Department.

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                        RLUK Wants Serials Price Reductions to Avoid Cuts That Would "Fatally Compromise" Research

                        Posted in Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on November 30th, 2010

                        Research Libraries UK has issued a press release about needed serials price reductions.

                        Here's an excerpt from the press release:

                        At its recent conference, RLUK announced it would not support future journal big deals unless they showed real price reductions. With a cut to the teaching grant and research budgets flat at best, RLUK members believe that unless this happens they will be forced to cancel significant numbers of subscriptions which will fatally compromise the UK's capacity for research.

                        For the past several years JISC Collections have negotiated with the publishers on behalf of UKHE. RLUK is so worried about the current situation that it has instructed JISC Collections to secure contracts which will not only rescind the unreasonable price rises of the last three years, but also offer affordable deals for the future. If reasonable deals cannot be struck RLUK libraries will be forced to provide information resources to their researchers and students in other ways.

                        "The capacity of UK universities to continue to pay such large year-on-year increases for access to scholarly journals is not infinite," said Professor Michael Arthur, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Leeds and Chair of the Russell Group of Universities. "To ensure the continued vitality of the UK's world-beating research base we need to reassess the costs of electronic access and find a new balance between the value added by publishers and the charges they make. We realise that finding such a balance may not be easy, but if we fail to address the problem now there will be serious long-term consequences for research and teaching in the UK."

                        "The UK Higher Education sector now spends almost £200m per year on access to journals and databases," explained David Prosser, RLUK's Executive Director. "This is 10% of the total QR funding the sector receives and increases above inflation each year. We understand the value publishers add to the publication process, but publishers must also understand that they cannot continue to increase prices at a time when budgets are so tight. We do not wish to cancel big deals, but we shall have no alternative unless the largest publishers substantially reduce their prices."

                        "Some RLUK members now pay over £1m a year to access journals from the largest publisher," said Phil Sykes, Chair of RLUK and Librarian at Liverpool University. "With annual journal price inflation running at double the rate of RPI since 2000, it has distorted the acquisition policies of libraries, with an ever-increasing proportion of budgets being spent on electronic big deals. This leads to diminishing funds for monographs, textbooks, and journals from smaller publishers, which cannot but damage scholarship and teaching in UKHE."

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