Archive for the 'Scholarly Journals' Category

"Perma: Scoping and Addressing the Problem of Link and Reference Rot in Legal Citations"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 24th, 2013

Jonathan Zittrain, Kendra Albert, and Lawrence Lessig have self-archived "Perma: Scoping and Addressing the Problem of Link and Reference Rot in Legal Citations" in SSRN.

Here's an excerpt:

We document a serious problem of reference rot: more than 70% of the URLs within the Harvard Law Review and other journals, and 50% of the URLs found within U.S. Supreme Court opinions do not link to the originally cited information.

Given that, we propose a solution for authors and editors of new scholarship that involves libraries undertaking the distributed, long-term preservation of link contents.

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    "A Look at Altmetrics and Its Growing Significance to Research Libraries"

    Posted in Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on September 20th, 2013

    Emily Puckett Rodgers and Sarah Barbrow have self-archived "A Look at Altmetrics and Its Growing Significance to Research Libraries" in Deep Blue.

    Here's an excerpt:

    This document serves as an informational review of the emerging field and practices of alternative metrics or altmetrics. It is intended to be used by librarians and faculty members in research libraries and universities to better understand the trends and challenges associated with altmetrics in higher education. It is also intended to be used by research libraries to offer guidance on how to participate in shaping this emerging field.

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      "The Diamond Model of Open Access Publishing: Why Policy Makers, Scholars, Universities, Libraries, Labour Unions and the Publishing World Need to Take Non-Commercial, Non-Profit Open Access Serious"

      Posted in Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 11th, 2013

      Christian Fuchs and Marisol Sandoval have published "The Diamond Model of Open Access Publishing: Why Policy Makers, Scholars, Universities, Libraries, Labour Unions and the Publishing World Need to Take Non-Commercial, Non-Profit Open Access Serious" in tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique: Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society.

      Here's an excerpt:

      In the Diamond Open Access Model, not-for-profit, non-commercial organizations, associations or networks publish material that is made available online in digital format, is free of charge for readers and authors and does not allow commercial and for-profit re-use.

      The fact that Diamond Open Access (DOA) has a digital format does not hinder that it is also made available in the form of printed publications in addition. We consider it as part of the model that publishers can charge for the actual printing costs without making monetary profits, but provide the digital version without charges. Publication "free of charge" means that neither authors nor individual readers nor institutions such as libraries have to pay for obtaining access to the literature published under the Diamond Open Access Model. Also authors or their institutions do not have to pay publication fees, article processing charges or other fees for getting articles published.

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        "The Publishing Delay in Scholarly Peer-Reviewed Journals"

        Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 6th, 2013

        Bo-Christer Björk and David Solomon have self-archived "The Publishing Delay in Scholarly Peer-Reviewed Journals."

        Here's an excerpt:

        Using a stratified random sample we studied average publishing delays in 2700 papers published in 135 journals sampled from the Scopus citation index. The shortest overall delays occur in science technology and medical (STM) fields and the longest in social science, arts/humanities and business/economics. Business/economics with a delay of 18 months took twice as long as chemistry with a 9 month average delay. Analysis of the variance indicated that by far the largest amount of variance in the time between submission and acceptance was among articles within a journal as compared with journals, disciplines or the size of the journal. For the time between acceptance and publication most of the variation in delay can be accounted for by differences between specific journals.

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          "The Inevitability of Open Access: Update One"

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on September 4th, 2013

          David W. Lewis has self-archived "The Inevitability of Open Access: Update One" in IUPUIScholarWorks.

          Here's an excerpt:

          This paper updates the author's 2012 article, "The Inevitability of Open Access" with recently published data. As a result it is possible to predict that Gold OA could account for 50 percent of the scholarly journal articles sometime between 2018 and 2020, and 90 percent of articles as soon as 2021 and more conservatively by 2024.

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            "Mining for Gold: Identifying the Librarians’ Toolkit for Managing Hybrid Open Access"

            Posted in Libraries, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on August 28th, 2013

            Jill Emery has published "Mining for Gold: Identifying the Librarians' Toolkit for Managing Hybrid Open Access" in the latest issue of Insights: the UKSG Journal.

            Here's an excerpt:

            In 2012, the author and colleagues surveyed eight publishers that had been involved with the Publishing and the Ecology of European Research (PEER) project to learn about the state of hybrid journal publishing. At the same time, one of the key questions asked to a panel of librarians at the International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers May 2012 Meeting was what role librarians would play if scholarly publishing shortly went open access (OA) across the board? From the survey of the market, and the rapid OA developments in the UK and EU that include hybrid OA, a picture has begun to emerge of what roles librarians can play with regard to supporting hybrid OA publishing at their institutions. This article focuses on developing new partnerships within a given institution, looks at new budgetary models and the tracking of local scholarship creation. Current pertinent standards are highlighted.

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              Science-Metrix Releases Three Reports on Open Access

              Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 22nd, 2013

              Science-Metrix has released three reports on open access: Proportion of Open Access Peer-Reviewed Papers at the European and World Levels—2004-2011, Open Data Access Policies and Strategies in the European Research Area and Beyond, and Open Access Strategies in the European Research Area.

              Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

              The first report measures the availability of scholarly publications in 22 fields of knowledge across the European Research Area, Brazil, Canada, Japan, and the United States, between 2004 and 2011. . . .

              The second report, focusing on open access policies, showed a growing trend in the adoption of such policies by governments and other funding bodies. . . .

              The third report found that open access to scientific data is less developed and more difficult to implement than open access to scholarly publications, both in terms of policies and infrastructure.

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                "A Framework for Systematic Analysis of Open Access Journals and its Application in Software Engineering and Information Systems"

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 22nd, 2013

                Daniel Graziotin, Xiaofeng Wang, and Pekka Abrahamsson have self-archived "A Framework for Systematic Analysis of Open Access Journals and its Application in Software Engineering and Information Systems" in arXiv.org.

                Here's an excerpt:

                This study empirically demonstrated that high publication charges are not sufficiently justified by the publishers, which often lack transparency and may prevent authors from adopting Open Access. It showed that there are no features provided by journals with publication fees, which are not offered by those not requiring charges to authors. The article warned the authors to investigate which agreements have been signed by the journal publisher in order to ensure visibility to accepted papers. It also raised important concerns like that the articles of three fourths of Open Access journals in Software Engineering and Information Systems may be in danger of disappearing if the journals lose their content. Last but not least, this study showed that Open Access journals and publishers in the fields of Software Engineering and Information Systems have a significant margin of improvement regarding the perceived trustworthiness.

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                  e-InfraNet: ‘Open’ as the Default Modus Operandi for Research and Higher Education

                  Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on August 21st, 2013

                  The the e-InfraNet project has released e-InfraNet: 'Open' as the Default Modus Operandi for Research and Higher Education.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  The basis for the policy framework is an overview of the current 'Open' landscape outlining contexts, drivers, achievements and effects of the various 'opens', as well as a number of common issues. Because of this commonality, coordinating the vision and approach can benefit all 'opens' individually, and contribute to the development of 'Open' as the default modus operandi for the research and higher education sectors. A pragmatic approach to the implementation of the vision will ensure the necessary flexibility to adjust for the diversity in the various 'opens' themselves and in their geographic and disciplinary contexts.

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                    "Correlation between Article Download and Citation Figures for Highly Accessed Articles from Five Open Access Oncology Journals"

                    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on July 16th, 2013

                    Carsten Nieder, Astrid Dalhaug, and Gro Aandahl have published "Correlation between Article Download and Citation Figures for Highly Accessed Articles from Five Open Access Oncology Journals" in SpringerPlus.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    Different approaches can be chosen to quantify the impact and merits of scientific oncology publications. These include source of publication (including journal reputation and impact factor), whether or not articles are cited by others, and access/download figures. When relying on citation counts, one needs to obtain access to citation databases and has to consider that results differ from one database to another. Accumulation of citations takes time and their dynamics might differ from journal to journal and topic to topic. Therefore, we wanted to evaluate the correlation between citation and download figures, hypothesising that articles with fewer downloads also accumulate fewer citations. Typically, publishers provide download figures together with the article. We extracted and analysed the 50 most viewed articles from 5 different open access oncology journals. For each of the 5 journals and also all journals combined, correlation between number of accesses and citations was limited (r=0.01-0.30). Considerable variations were also observed when analyses were restricted to specific article types such as reviews only (r=0.21) or case reports only (r=0.53). Even if year of publication was taken into account, high correlation coefficients were the exception from the rule. In conclusion, downloads are not a universal surrogate for citation figures.

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                      "The Characteristics of Journal Editorial Boards in Library and Information Science"

                      Posted in Libraries, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 12th, 2013

                      Peter Willett has published "The Characteristics of Journal Editorial Boards in Library and Information Science" in the latest issue of the International Journal of Knowledge Content Development & Technology.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      A study of the members of the editorial boards of 16 leading LIS journals shows that the boards vary markedly in size, in diversity (in terms of both gender and nationality) and in the experience and publication/citation profiles (based on Web of Science data) of their board-members. A typical editorial board member will be male, work in the USA, have published their first LIS article in 1995, and have 9.5 publications and 39 non-self citations to those publications, with the publication/citation profiles differing significantly from those of non-board-member contributors to the 16 journals

                      .

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                        "Do Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences and Humanities? Findings from a 2011 Survey of Academic Publishers"

                        Posted in Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs), Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on July 11th, 2013

                        Marisa L. Ramirez et al. have published "Do Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences and Humanities? Findings from a 2011 Survey of Academic Publishers" in the latest issue of College & Research Libraries.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        An increasing number of higher education institutions worldwide are requiring submission of electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) by graduate students and are subsequently providing open access to these works in online repositories. Faculty advisors and graduate students are concerned that such unfettered access to their work could diminish future publishing opportunities. This study investigated social sciences, arts, and humanities journal editors' and university press directors' attitudes toward ETDs. The findings indicate that manuscripts that are revisions of openly accessible ETDs are always welcome for submission or considered on a case-by-case basis by 82.8 percent of journal editors and 53.7 percent of university press directors polled.

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