Archive for the 'Scholarly Journals' Category

Copyright Clearance Center Launches New Service for Publishers: Open Access Solutions

Posted in Copyright, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on October 14th, 2012

The Copyright Clearance Center has launched a new service for Publishers called Open Access Solutions.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

CCC helps publishers manage variable Open Access (OA) models through its RightsLink™ platform, which supports unique pricing rules, licenses and messaging for OA journals, encouraging compliance with funding agency requirements. . . .

CCC makes it easier for publishers to charge different Open Access fees pre-publication based on variables such as author affiliation/membership, funding source and journal type; communicates publisher-specified reuse rights post-publication to users seeking permissions for all content including Open Access articles; captures valuable data about user interest in and reuse of publishers' Open Access publications; and provides the ability for publishers to add RightsLink to its content wherever it resides online, even in third-party repositories such as HighWire or PubMed Central.

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

Open Access: SCOAP3 Launched

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on October 1st, 2012

The SCOAP3 open access initiative has been launched at a meeting at CERN, and it will become operational in 2014.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

In the SCOAP3 model, libraries and funding agencies pool resources currently used to subscribe to journal content and use them to support the peer-review system directly instead. Journal publishers then make their articles Open Access, which means that anyone can read them. Authors retain the copyright, and generous licenses for re-use are used.

Publishers of 12 journals, accounting for the vast majority of articles in the field, have been identified for participation in SCOAP3 through an open and competitive process, and the SCOAP3 initiative looks forward to establishing more partnerships with key institutions in Europe, America and Asia as it moves through the technical steps of organizing the re-direction of funds from the current subscription model to a common internationally coordinated fund.

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

"Understanding and Making Use of Academic Authors’ Open Access Rights"

Posted in Author Rights, Copyright, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on September 30th, 2012

David R. Hansen has published "Understanding and Making Use of Academic Authors' Open Access Rights" in the latest issue of the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

METHODS To understand the scope of author-retained rights (including the right to purchase hybrid or other open access options) at some sample universities, author-rights data through the SHERPA/RoMEO API was combined with individual article citations (from Thomson Reuters' Web of Science) for works published over a one-year period (2011) and authored by individuals affiliated with five major U.S. research universities. RESULTS Authors retain significant rights in the articles that they create. Of the 29,322 unique articles authored over the one year period at the five universities, 28.83 percent could be archived in final PDF form and 87.95 percent could be archived as the post-print version. Nearly 43.47 percent also provided authors the choice of purchasing a hybrid paid open access option. DISCUSSION A significant percentage of current published output could be archived with little or no author intervention. With prior approval through an open access policy or otherwise, article manuscripts or final PDFs can be obtained and archived by library staff, and hybrid paid-OA options could be negotiated and exploited by library administrators.

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

Budapest Open Access Initiative Issues Recommendations for Next Ten Years of Open Access Development

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 12th, 2012

The Budapest Open Access Initiative has issued recommendations for the next ten years of open access development.

Here's an excerpt:

Ten years ago the Budapest Open Access Initiative launched a worldwide campaign for open access (OA) to all new peer-reviewed research. It didn't invent the idea of OA. On the contrary, it deliberately drew together existing projects to explore how they might "work together to achieve broader, deeper, and faster success." But the BOAI was the first initiative to use the term "open access" for this purpose, the first to articulate a public definition, the first to propose complementary strategies for realizing OA, the first to generalize the call for OA to all disciplines and countries, and the first to be accompanied by significant funding. . . .

The problems that previously held up the adoption and implementation of OA are solved, and the solutions are spreading. But until OA spreads further, the problems for which OA is a solution will remain largely unsolved. In this statement, we reaffirm the ends and means of the original BOAI, and recommit ourselves to make progress. But in addition, we specifically set the new goal that within the next ten years, OA will become the default method for distributing new peer-reviewed research in every field and country.

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

UK Government Allocates £10 Million to Support Open Access

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on September 9th, 2012

The UK Government has allocated £10 million to support open access in UK research universities.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

The investment will enable a number of research-intensive UK institutions to kick-start the process of developing policies and setting up funds to meet the costs of article processing charges (APCs). This is in line with the recommendations of the Finch report on open access, published in June. . . .

The investment will be made to 30 institutions receiving funding through Research Councils and UK higher education funding councils. It is in addition to the contribution RCUK will be making to institutions to support payment of APCs associated with open access through block funding grants from 1 April 2013 onwards. More details of this will be announced in the autumn.

The UK Funding Councils will launch a consultation this autumn on implementing a requirement that research outputs submitted to any future Research Excellence Framework (REF) should be as widely accessible as possible.

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

Researcher Attitudes and Behaviour Towards the ‘Openness’ of Research Outputs in Agriculture and Related Fields

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 6th, 2012

Coherence in Information for Agricultural Research for Development has released Researcher Attitudes and Behaviour Towards the 'Openness' of Research Outputs in Agriculture and Related Fields.

Here's an excerpt:

An online worldwide survey of researchers in agriculture and related fields was carried out in March 2011 by the CGIAR, FAO and GFAR on behalf of the CIARD (Coherence in Information for Agricultural Research for Development) initiative. The aim of the survey was to gain greater understanding of researcher behaviours and attitudes in relation to communicating research outputs and making such outputs open and accessible. There were almost 1500 responses to the survey, with 50% of respondents identifying that they worked in Latin America and 33% in Africa. The survey analysis shows that, although researchers are driven in their work by many different and interacting motivations, institutional/organizational factors are very important and have much influence over individuals' behaviour. Often, making a research output freely and openly available can be in the hands of the individual, and some will act in this way. However, for many others there are perceived barriers to this, such as the lack of required resources and of institutional policies to drive these activities. Further, current behaviours in choosing routes to communicate research results are still strongly biased toward the traditional routes of publishing in journals and books and appearing at conferences, though the availability and increasing use of digital formats is starting to broaden the spread of communication pathways used. The paper ends with reference to the relevance and importance to the CIARD initiative of the results of the survey.

| Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals | Digital Scholarship |

"Tectonic Movements toward OA in the UK and Europe"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on September 5th, 2012

Peter Suber has published "Tectonic Movements toward OA in the UK and Europe" in the latest issue of the SPARC Open Access Newsletter.

Here's an excerpt:

Because this article is long, I'm including a table of contents:

1. Three major OA announcements from the UK on the same day

2. Some recent history as context for these announcements

3. Basics of the new RCUK policy

4. Basics of the Finch recommendations

5. General agreement between the RCUK policy and Finch recommendations

6. Appreciation of the large-scale shift to OA in the UK

7. Some consequences for journals and authors

8. Responding to publisher fears of green OA

9. Objections and recommendations

10. Announcements from Europe the day after the UK announcements

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: "This bibliography is recommended for everyone interested in open access publishing." — M. Blobaum, Journal of the Medical Library Association 100, no. 1 (2012): 73. | Digital Scholarship |

NISO Releases JATS: Journal Article Tag Suite, ANSI/NISO Z39.96-2012

Posted in Metadata, Scholarly Journals, Standards on August 23rd, 2012

NISO has released JATS: Journal Article Tag Suite, ANSI/NISO Z39.96-2012.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) announces the publication of a new American National Standard, JATS: Journal Article Tag Suite, ANSI/NISO Z39.96-2012. JATS provides a common XML format in which publishers and archives can exchange journal content by preserving the intellectual content of journals independent of the form in which that content was originally delivered. In addition to the element and attribute descriptions, three journal article tag sets (the Archiving and Interchange Tag Set, the Journal Publishing Tag Set, and the Article Authoring Tag Set) are part of the standard. While designed to describe the textual and graphical content of journal articles, it can also be used for some other materials, such as letters, editorials, and book and product reviews. "Al

| Digital Scholarship's Digital/Print Books | Digital Scholarship |


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