Archive for the 'Self-Archiving' Category

"Maximizing the Benefits of Open Access: Strategies for Enhancing the Discovery of Open Access Content"

Posted in OPACs/Discovery Systems, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on October 8th, 2015

Maria Bonn has published "Maximizing the Benefits of Open Access: Strategies for Enhancing the Discovery 0f Open Access Content" in College & Research Libraries News.

Here's an excerpt:

To achieve some economies of scale in library acquisition of OA publications, we should leverage the library crown and work the library network. There's no point in libraries all over the world laboriously replicating the same work of evaluation, selection, and acquisition when they have the tools, methods, and community to work in collaboration. Subject specialists might organize themselves in clusters to share the initial work of discovery and establish criteria for evaluation that can be collectively trusted

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"The Role of arXiv, RePEc, SSRN and PMC in Formal Scholarly Communication"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Self-Archiving on October 5th, 2015

Xuemei Li has self-archived "The Role of arXiv, RePEc, SSRN and PMC in Formal Scholarly Communication."

Here's an excerpt:

The four major Subject Repositories (SRs), arXiv, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Social Science Research Network (SSRN) and PubMed Central (PMC), are all important within their disciplines but no previous study has systematically compared how often they are cited in academic publications. In response, this article reports an analysis of citations to SRs from Scopus publications, 2000 to 2013.

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"An Interview with Peter Suber on Open Access"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on October 1st, 2015

Cheryl LaGuardia has published "An Interview with Peter Suber on Open Access" in Library Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

Because hybrid is no-risk, it has spread like wildfire. I used to think that was good, since at least it gave publishers first-hand experience with the economics of fee-based OA journals. But I changed my mind about that years ago

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"Optimizing Open Access Policy "

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on September 14th, 2015

Stevan Harnad has self-archived "Optimizing Open Access Policy."

Here's an excerpt:

This overview of the current status of Open Access (OA) to peer-reviewed research describes the steps that need to be taken to achieve universal OA. . . . To accelerate progress, more institutions and funders need to adopt more effective OA mandates: All universities and funders should require (1) institutional deposit (2) immediately upon acceptance for publication; urge (but not require) (3) immediate OA and (4) rights-retention; (5) minimize allowable embargo length, (6) implement the copy-request Button; (7) provide rich usage and citation metrics and (8) designate repository deposit of publications as the locus for institutional performance review as well as funding applications and renewals.

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Dspace@MIT: 17,400 Articles Deposited and over 3.3 Million Downloads

Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on September 10th, 2015

MIT's Dspace@MIT has had 17,400 articles deposited and over 3.3 million downloads.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

A new milestone was reached in collecting articles under the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy : 43% of the articles published by faculty since they adopted their Policy are now being shared through the Open Access Articles Collection in Dspace@MIT.

As of the end of July 2015, downloads of the 17,400 articles deposited in relation to the Policy topped 3.3 million, with over 83,500 downloads during the month.

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"Connecting the Pieces: Using ORCIDs to Improve Research Impact and Repositories"

Posted in Institutional Repositories, Metadata, Self-Archiving on September 10th, 2015

Mohamed Baessa et al have published "Connecting the Pieces: Using ORCIDs to Improve Research Impact and Repositories" in F1000 Research.

Here's an excerpt:

Integration with ORCID has been a key element in this process and the best way to ensure data quality for researcher's scientific contributions. It included the systematic inclusion and creation, if necessary, of ORCID identifiers in the existing repository system, an institutional membership in ORCID, and the creation of dedicated integration tools. In addition and in cooperation with the Office of Research Evaluation, the Library worked at implementing a Current Research Information System (CRIS) as a standardized common resource to monitor KAUST research outputs.

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"The Rutgers Open Access Policy: Implementation Planning for Success"

Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on September 8th, 2015

Laura Bowering Mullen and Jane Johnson Otto have self-archived "The Rutgers Open Access Policy: Implementation Planning for Success."

Here's an excerpt:

At Rutgers University, an open access resolution was passed by the University Senate in October, 2012, and was codified in the official Rutgers University Policy Library in October, 2014. All of the work that the authors coordinated to get to the point of passing the policy was only the beginning of making open access a reality at Rutgers. Since the date that the policy has passed, the authors have been leading an implementation effort (using an established timeline) which includes a new web portal for scholarship, as well as developing materials and presentations for various open access policy-focused education and outreach efforts.. . . The authors provide background and a case study to illustrate the implementation efforts underway as Rutgers comes closer to the official date that the policy will go into effect university-wide on Sept. 1, 2015.

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"Accelerating Scientific Publication in Biology"

Posted in Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 22nd, 2015

Ronald D Vale has self-archived "Accelerating Scientific Publication in Biology."

Here's an excerpt:

Our analysis suggests that publication practices have changed considerably in the life sciences over the past thirty years. Considerably more experimental data is now required for publication, and the average time required for graduate students to publish their first paper has increased and is approaching the desirable duration of Ph.D. training. Since publication is generally a requirement for career progression, schemes to reduce the time of graduate student and postdoctoral training may be difficult to implement without also considering new mechanisms for accelerating communication of their work. The increasing time to publication also delays potential catalytic effects that ensue when many scientists have access to new information. The time has come for the life scientists, funding agencies, and publishers to discuss how to communicate new findings in a way that best serves the interests of the public and scientific community.

See also: "Thoughts on Ron Vale's 'Accelerating Scientific Publication in Biology'" by Michael Eisen.

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Emerald Announces Zero Embargo Trial for Library and Information Science Journals

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 15th, 2015

Emerald has announced a zero embargo trial for library and information science journals.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Emerald Group Publishing, global publisher linking research and practice, today announces the launch of its Green Open Access, Zero Embargo trial, applicable for all mandated articles submitted to the company's Library and Information Science (LIS) and selected Information and Knowledge Management journals.

This change allows authors to deposit the post-print version of the article into their respective institutional repository immediately upon official publication, rather than after Emerald's 24 month embargo period for mandated articles. . . .

The evaluation of this trial will help to inform future Emerald Open Access initiatives. Emerald will work with its Librarian Advisory Group to assess the impact of the trial, by monitoring the quality and volume of submissions, feedback from authors, and readership figures from both the Emerald platform and institutional repositories.

See also: "Emerald and Open Access."

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"Dutch Universities Start Elsevier Boycott—Will This Be a Game Changer or Will Publisher Profits Remain Unaffected?"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 9th, 2015

LSE Impact of Social Sciences has released "Dutch Universities Start Elsevier Boycott—Will This Be a Game Changer or Will Publisher Profits Remain Unaffected?."

Here's an excerpt:

Led by vice chancellors, Dutch universities have recently announced plans for a country-wide boycott of the academic publisher Elsevier. This boycott has the potential to be a significant game changer in the relationship between the research community and the world's largest academic publisher. But how will it affect open access momentum in the UK and around the world? Here we have brought together two expert views on the subject. Danny Kingsley, the Head of Scholarly Communication at University of Cambridge and Steven Harnad, longtime advocate for open access, share their views on what the Dutch boycott can hope to achieve.

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23 Groups Oppose Elsevier’s New Sharing and Hosting Policy

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 21st, 2015

SPARC has released "New Policy from Elsevier Impedes Open Access and Sharing."

Here's an excerpt:

[Statement]

On April 30, 2015, Elsevier announced a new sharing and hosting policy for Elsevier journal articles. This policy represents a significant obstacle to the dissemination and use of research knowledge, and creates unnecessary barriers for Elsevier published authors in complying with funders' open access policies. In addition, the policy has been adopted without any evidence that immediate sharing of articles has a negative impact on publishers' subscriptions.

Despite the claim by Elsevier that the policy advances sharing, it actually does the opposite. The policy imposes unacceptably long embargo periods of up to 48 months for some journals. It also requires authors to apply a "non-commercial and no derivative works" license for each article deposited into a repository, greatly inhibiting the re-use value of these articles. Any delay in the open availability of research articles curtails scientific progress and places unnecessary constraints on delivering the benefits of research back to the public.

Furthermore, the policy applies to "all articles previously published and those published in the future" making it even more punitive for both authors and institutions. This may also lead to articles that are currently available being suddenly embargoed and inaccessible to readers.

As organizations committed to the principle that access to information advances discovery, accelerates innovation and improves education, we support the adoption of policies and practices that enable the immediate, barrier free access to and reuse of scholarly articles. This policy is in direct conflict with the global trend towards open access and serves only to dilute the benefits of openly sharing research results.

We strongly urge Elsevier to reconsider this policy and we encourage other organizations and individuals to express their opinions.

The statement is available here and we welcome others to show their support by also endorsing it.

The statement has been signed by the following groups:

COAR: Confederation of Open Access Repositories
SPARC: Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition
ACRL: Association of College and Research Libraries
ALA: American Library Association
ARL: Association of Research Libraries
Association of Southeastern Research Libraries
Australian Open Access Support Group
IBICT: Brazilian Institute of Information in Science and Technology
CARL: Canadian Association of Research Libraries
CLACSO: Consejo Latinoamericano de Ciencias Sociales
COAPI: Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions
Creative Commons
Creative Commons (USA)
EIFL
Electronic Frontier Foundation
Greater Western Library Alliance
LIBER: European Research Library Association
National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences
OpenAIRE
Open Data Hong Kong
Research Libraries UK
SANLiC: South African National Licensing Consortium
University of St Andrews Library

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University of Windsor Senate Adopts Open Access Policy

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 19th, 2015

The University of Windsor Senate has adopted an open access policy.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

In recognition of the importance of providing open access to Windsor research, and building on the momentum of the Tri-Council Open Access Policy (CIHR, NSERC, SSHRC), University Senate passed the University of Windsor's own open access policy (OA), Friday May 8. . . .

In Canada, the recent release of the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications requires grant recipients, as of May 2015, to take steps to ensure that peer-reviewed journal publications arising from supported research are made freely accessible within 12 months of publication.

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