Archive for the 'Social Media/Web 2.0' Category

"Scholarly Use of Social Media and Altmetrics: A Review of the Literature"

Posted in Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics, Social Media/Web 2.0 on August 31st, 2016

Cassidy R. Sugimoto et al. have self-archived "Scholarly Use of Social Media and Altmetrics: A Review of the Literature."

Here's an excerpt:

This review provides an extensive account of the state-of-the art in both scholarly use of social media and altmetrics. The review consists of two main parts: the first examines the use of social media in academia, examining the various functions these platforms have in the scholarly communication process and the factors that affect this use. The second part reviews empirical studies of altmetrics, discussing the various interpretations of altmetrics, data collection and methodological limitations, and differences according to platform. The review ends with a critical discussion of the implications of this transformation in the scholarly communication system.

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Preserving Social Media

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Social Media/Web 2.0 on March 2nd, 2016

The Digital Preservation Coalition has released Preserving Social Media.

Here's an excerpt:

This report provides an overview of strategies for the archiving of social media for long-term access, for both policy and implementation. Specifically, it addresses social networking platforms and platforms with significant amounts of user-generated content, excluding blogs, trading, and marketing sites, which are covered in other Technology Watch Reports.

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OCLC Launches Next Blog

Posted in OCLC, Social Media/Web 2.0 on February 10th, 2016

OCLC Launches has launched the Next blog.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

OCLC has launched a new blog: Next. Focused on what comes next for libraries, librarians, and the communities they serve, it will draw upon OCLC staff with a variety of experiences and perspectives.

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"Tracing Digital Footprints to Academic Articles: An Investigation of PeerJ Publication Referral Data"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Social Media/Web 2.0 on January 22nd, 2016

Xianwen Wang, Shenmeng Xu, and Zhichao Fang have self-archived "Tracing Digital Footprints to Academic Articles: An Investigation of PeerJ Publication Referral Data."

Here's an excerpt:

In this study, we propose a novel way to explore the patterns of people's visits to academic articles. About 3.4 million links to referral source of visitors of 1432 papers published in the journal of PeerJ are collected and analyzed. We find that at least 57% visits are from external referral sources, among which General Search Engine, Social Network, and News & Blog are the top three categories of referrals. Academic Resource, including academic search engines and academic publishers' sites, is the fourth largest category of referral sources. In addition, our results show that Google contributes significantly the most in directing people to scholarly articles. . . . Correlation analysis and regression analysis indicates that papers with more mentions are expected to have more visitors, and Facebook, Twitter and Reddit are the most commonly used social networking tools that refer people to PeerJ.

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"Academic Social Networks and Open Access: French Researchers at the Crossroads"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Social Media/Web 2.0 on January 20th, 2016

Christine Okret-Manville has published "Academic Social Networks and Open Access: French Researchers at the Crossroads" in LIBER Quarterly.

Here's an excerpt:

For some years, researchers have been using new ways to communicate and share their work by using academic social networks. In an attempt to foster the development of Open Access in France, the French consortium COUPERIN (Unified Consortium of Higher Education and Research Organizations for Access to Numerical Publications) proposed that academic social networks could be used to convince researchers of becoming more involved in Open Access. To test this hypothesis, a nationwide survey was launched in 2014 to explore whether and how these academic social networks are used to share content, but also how they compare to other Open Access classic tools. Within a month (20 May to 20 June), 1,898 researchers answered this 28-question survey. It was fully completed by 1,698 of them.

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Social Media Usage: 2005-2015

Posted in Reports and White Papers, Social Media/Web 2.0 on October 9th, 2015

The Pew Research Center has released Social Media Usage: 2005-2015.

Here's an excerpt:

Nearly two-thirds of American adults (65%) use social networking sites, up from 7% when Pew Research Center began systematically tracking social media usage in 2005. Pew Research reports have documented in great detail how the rise of social media has affected such things as work, politics and political deliberation, communications patterns around the globe, as well as the way people get and share information about health, civic life, news consumption, communities, teenage life, parenting, dating and even people's level of stress.

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"A Library in the Palm of Your Hand: Mobile Services in Top 100 University Libraries"

Posted in Research Libraries, Social Media/Web 2.0 on July 24th, 2015

Yan Quan Liu and Sarah Briggs have published "A Library in the Palm of Your Hand: Mobile Services in Top 100 University Libraries" in Information Technology and Libraries.

Here's an excerpt:

What is the current state of mobile services among academic libraries of the country's top 100 universities, and what are the best practices for librarians implementing mobile services at the university level? Through in-depth website visits and survey questionnaires, the authors studied each of the top 100 universities' libraries' experiences with mobile services. Results showed that all of these libraries offered at least one mobile service, and the majority offered multiple services. The most common mobile services offered were mobile sites, text messaging services, e-books, and mobile access to databases and the catalog. In addition, chat/IM services, social media accounts and apps were very popular. Survey responses also indicated a trend towards responsive design for websites so that patrons can access the library's full site on any mobile device. Respondents recommend that libraries considering offering mobile services begin as soon as possible as patron demand for these services is expected to increase.

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"Scholarly Social Media Profiles and Libraries: A Review"

Posted in Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Metrics, Social Media/Web 2.0 on May 11th, 2015

Judit Ward et al. have published "Scholarly Social Media Profiles and Libraries: A Review" in LIBER Quarterly.

Here's an excerpt:

This article aims to point out emerging roles and responsibilities for academic librarians with the potential of better integrating the library in the research process. In order to find out how to enhance the online reputation and discoverability of individual faculty members as well as their affiliated institutions, the authors worked side-by-side with researchers in the United States and Europe to explore, create, revise, and disambiguate scholarly profiles in various software applications. In an attempt to understand and organize scholarly social media, including new, alternative metrics, the authors reviewed and classified the major academic profile platforms, highlighting the overlapping elements, benefits, and drawbacks inherent in each. The consensus is that it would be time-consuming to keep one's profile current and accurate on all of these platforms, given the plethora of underlying problems, also discussed in detail in the article. However, it came as a startling discovery that reluctance to engage with scholarly social media may cause a misrepresentation of a researcher's academic achievements and may come with unforeseen consequences. The authors claim that current skills and competencies can secure an essential role for academic librarians in the research workflow by means of monitoring and navigating researcher profiles in scholarly social media in order to best represent the scholarship of their host institutions.

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"Fast and Made to Last: Academic Blogs Look to Ensure Long-Term Accessibility and Stability of Content"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Publishing, Social Media/Web 2.0 on May 1st, 2015

Christof Schöch has published "Fast and Made to Last: Academic Blogs Look to Ensure Long-Term Accessibility and Stability of Content" in Impact of Social Sciences.

Here's an excerpt:

The advantage of blogs compared with such talks is that here, discussions can happen across geographical and temporal borders, and that they stay visible online in comments or companion posts. But aren't blog posts, ultimately, almost as fleeting as a talk at a workshop? Who makes sure the content stays online not just today and tomorrow, but in the long term? Who guarantees that the link to the post remains the same? Who ensures that the text will not be modified later on? These are issues that need to be resolved if blogs are to be reliable, trusted, citeable resources and receive academic recognition even in the absence of traditional pre-publication peer-review. . . . The research blogging platform hypotheses.org has understood this early on. This fact is undoubtedly a factor in the success of the platform, which is run by the French initiative OpenEdition and currently hosts 1006 (and counting) research blogs in French, Spanish, Portuguese, German and English coming from the Humanities and Social Sciences.

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"Tweets as Impact Indicators: Examining the Implications of Automated Bot Accounts on Twitter"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Metrics, Social Media/Web 2.0 on October 17th, 2014

Stefanie Haustein et al. have self-archived "Tweets as Impact Indicators: Examining the Implications of Automated Bot Accounts on Twitter."

Here's an excerpt:

This brief communication presents preliminary findings on automated Twitter accounts distributing links to scientific papers deposited on the preprint repository arXiv. It discusses the implication of the presence of such bots from the perspective of social media metrics (altmetrics), where mentions of scholarly documents on Twitter have been suggested as a means of measuring impact that is both broader and timelier than citations. We present preliminary findings that automated Twitter accounts create a considerable amount of tweets to scientific papers and that they behave differently than common social bots, which has critical implications for the use of raw tweet counts in research evaluation and assessment. We discuss some definitions of Twitter cyborgs and bots in scholarly communication and propose differentiating between different levels of engagement from tweeting only bibliographic information to discussing or commenting on the content of a paper.

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"Terms of Service on Social Media Sites"

Posted in Copyright, Social Media/Web 2.0 on August 28th, 2014

Corinne Hui Yun Tan has self-archived "Terms of Service on Social Media Sites".

Here's an excerpt:

This article considers the provisions within the terms of service ('TOS') of the social media behemoths of today—Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and the Wikimedia Foundation. In particular, it examines the main provisions that purport to regulate, from a copyright perspective, generative activities on social media sites. This empirical work is undertaken so that the article can shed light on the relationship between the contractual and copyright regimes. To do so, the article identifies the instances where the contractual regime is to some extent aligned with the copyright regime, and further, where there are potential incompatibilities between the two regimes.

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"Online Collaboration: Scientists and the Social Network"

Posted in Scholarly Communication, Social Media/Web 2.0 on August 18th, 2014

Richard Van Noorde has published "Online Collaboration: Scientists and the Social Network" in Nature.

Here's an excerpt:

More than 4.5 million researchers have signed up for ResearchGate, and another 10,000 arrive every day, says Madisch. That is a pittance compared with Facebook's 1.3 billion active users, but astonishing for a network that only researchers can join.

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