Archive for the 'Social Media/Web 2.0' Category

"Internet Publicity of Data Problems in the Bioscience Literature Correlates with Enhanced Corrective Action"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals, Social Media/Web 2.0 on April 7th, 2014

Paul S. Brookes has published "Internet Publicity of Data Problems in the Bioscience Literature Correlates with Enhanced Corrective Action" in PeerJ.

Here's an excerpt:

Several online forums exist to facilitate open and/or anonymous discussion of the peer-reviewed scientific literature. Data integrity is a common discussion topic, and it is widely assumed that publicity surrounding such matters will accelerate correction of the scientific record. This study aimed to test this assumption by examining a collection of 497 papers for which data integrity had been questioned either in public or in private. As such, the papers were divided into two sub-sets: a public set of 274 papers discussed online, and the remainder a private set of 223 papers not publicized. The sources of alleged data problems, as well as criteria for defining problem data, and communication of problems to journals and appropriate institutions, were similar between the sets. The number of laboratory groups represented in each set was also similar (75 in public, 62 in private), as was the number of problem papers per laboratory group (3.65 in public, 3.54 in private). Over a study period of 18 months, public papers were retracted 6.5-fold more, and corrected 7.7-fold more, than those in the private set. Parsing the results by laboratory group, 28 laboratory groups in the public set had papers which received corrective action, versus 6 laboratory groups in the private set. For those laboratory groups in the public set with corrected/retracted papers, the fraction of their papers acted on was 62% of those initially flagged, whereas in the private set this fraction was 27%. Such clustering of actions suggests a pattern in which correction/retraction of one paper from a group correlates with more corrections/retractions from the same group, with this pattern being stronger in the public set. It is therefore concluded that online discussion enhances levels of corrective action in the scientific literature. Nevertheless, anecdotal discussion reveals substantial room for improvement in handling of such matters.

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    "Scholars and Their Blogs: Characteristics, Preferences, and Perceptions Impacting Digital Preservation"

    Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Scholarly Communication, Social Media/Web 2.0 on April 24th, 2013

    Carolyn F. Hank has self-archived "Scholars and Their Blogs: Characteristics, Preferences, and Perceptions Impacting Digital Preservation" in the Carolina Digital Repository.

    Here's an excerpt:

    This descriptive study investigated scholars who blog in the areas of history, economics, law, biology, chemistry and physics, as well as attributes of their respective blogs. It offers an examination of scholars' attitudes and perceptions of their blogs in relation to the system of scholarly communication and their preferences for digital preservation.. . . Most feel their blogs should be preserved for both personal and public access and use into the indefinite, rather than short-term, future. Scholars who blog identify themselves as most responsible for blog preservation. Concerning capability, scholars perceive blog service providers, hosts, and networks as most capable. National and institutional-based libraries and archives, as well as institutional IT departments, are perceived as least responsible and capable for preservation of scholars' respective blogs.

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      "A Mobile Interface for DSpace"

      Posted in Digital Repositories, DSpace, Institutional Repositories, Open Source Software, Social Media/Web 2.0 on March 18th, 2013

      Elías Tzoc has published "A Mobile Interface for DSpace" in the latest issue of D-Lib Magazine.

      Here's an excerpt:

      Academic libraries were among the first adopters of mobile websites in universities, but much of the early development was focused exclusively on traditional library content such as the library's homepage, catalog, contact information, etc. As libraries continue to work on new technology developments, a mobile interface for their institutional repositories can be a good new way to reach out to faculty and other interested parties. Miami University's Scholarly Commons runs on DSpace as part of a shared infrastructure administered by OhioLINK. DSpace is used at academic institutions, research and resource centers, museums, national libraries, and government and commercial organizations. With over a thousand installations in more than 90 countries, DSpace is the most widely used open source repository platform by any measure. The steady popularity of DSpace suggests that a lot of institutions will benefit from an out-of-the-box mobile interface. This article describes the development and implementation of the first mobile interface developed for DSpace using the jQuery Mobile Framework.

      Note: Includes links to software.

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        The Demographics of Social Media Users—2012

        Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers, Social Media/Web 2.0 on February 18th, 2013

        The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released The Demographics of Social Media Users—2012.

        Here's an excerpt:

        A late 2012 survey by the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project shows that young adults are more likely than others to use major social media. At the same time, other groups are interested in different sites and services.

        Internet users under 50 are particularly likely to use a social networking site of any kind, and those 18-29 are the most likely of any demographic cohort to do so (83%). Women are more likely than men to be on these sites. Those living in urban settings are also significantly more likely than rural internet users to use social networking.

        | Digital Scholarship Overview | Digital Scholarship |

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          "Undergraduates’ Use of Social Media as Information Sources"

          Posted in Libraries, Social Media/Web 2.0 on February 11th, 2013

          College & Research Libraries has released a preprint of "Undergraduates' Use of Social Media as Information Sources."

          Here's an excerpt:

          Focusing on undergraduate students, a survey was conducted to investigate the following: (1) which social media platforms are used as information sources, (2) what are the main reasons for using these social media platforms for information seeking, and (3) what kinds of actions are taken to evaluate the quality of the information gained from such sources. The study provides a snapshot of current trends in terms of the use of social media as information sources. It also sheds lights on the actions that the undergraduate students took to evaluate information from social media, including social networking and video sharing sites that have rarely been studied previously.

          | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 ( paperback and PDF file; over 3,800 entries) | Digital Scholarship |

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            "The Impact of Social Media on the Dissemination of Research: Results of an Experiment"

            Posted in Scholarly Communication, Social Media/Web 2.0 on October 9th, 2012

            Melissa Terras has published "The Impact of Social Media on the Dissemination of Research: Results of an Experiment" in the latest issue of the Journal of Digital Humanities.

            Here's an excerpt:

            From now on, I will definitely post anything I publish straight into our institutional repository, and blog and tweet it straight away. After all, the time it takes to undertake research, and write research papers, and see them through to publication is large; the time it takes to blog or tweet about them is negligible. .

            | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

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              "The Liblog Landscape: Where Are They Now?"

              Posted in Libraries, Social Media/Web 2.0 on September 10th, 2012

              Walt Crawford has published "The Liblog Landscape: Where Are They Now?" in the latest issue of Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large.

              Here's an excerpt:

              As I was preparing the two-part Words essay Thinking About Blogs, and specifically Part 2 with its emphasis on libraries and liblogs, I got to wondering: Where are they now? And I'd seen hints here and there that people were missing a reasonably comprehensive list of what's out there. . . .

              The results come in two flavors. This essay offers the basic facts: How many have disappeared, how many appear to be moribund (or have officially closed) but are still visible, how recently each blog had been updated and some overall comments on longevity. The second flavor is a new page linked to from Walt at Random consisting of two lists of hyperlinked liblog names: One for blogs updated sometime within the past year (when checked—that is, sometime after July 30, 2011) that haven't explicitly closed, one for closed and apparently-moribund blogs. Blogs that disappeared entirely aren't in either list. You'll find that list at waltcrawford.name/liblogs.

              | Digital Scholarship's Weblogs and Tweets | Digital Scholarship |

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                Delivering Web to Mobile

                Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers, Social Media/Web 2.0 on May 10th, 2012

                JISC has released Delivering Web to Mobile.

                Here's an excerpt:

                This report looks at the growth of mobile, the state of the Web and gives an overview of approaches to delivering content and services optimised for the mobile context. This includes approaches to Web design for responsive sites, leveraging access to device functions and capabilities and the use of Web technologies to build mobile applications.

                | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010: "This bibliography portal demonstrates that citation lists continue to play a role in research, in spite of the availability of powerful Web and digital library search engines and the near-extinction of print bibliography publishing. Summing Up: Recommended." — J. A. Buczynski, Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries 45, no. 1 (1997): 58. | Digital Scholarship |

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