Archive for the 'Social Media/Web 2.0' Category

Privacy Considerations in Cloud-Based Teaching and Learning Environments

Posted in Cloud Computing/SaaS, Privacy, Reports and White Papers, Social Media/Web 2.0 on January 24th, 2011

The EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative has released Privacy Considerations in Cloud-Based Teaching and Learning Environments.

Here's an excerpt:

In this white paper, we outline the privacy issues relevant to using cloud-based instructional tools or cloud-based teaching and learning environments for faculty members and those supporting instruction. Our discussion of how teaching and learning in an increasingly technological environment has transformed the way we interact and interpret FERPA will help inform various choices that institutions can consider to best address the law, including policy and best-practice examples. We highlight practical suggestions for how faculty members can continue to use innovative instructional strategies and engage students while considering privacy issues. Finally, this paper discusses ways to further explore and address privacy locally and includes a comprehensive resource list for further reading.

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    Wikipedia, Past and Present

    Posted in Reports and White Papers, Social Media/Web 2.0 on January 18th, 2011

    The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released Wikipedia, Past and Present.

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    The percentage of all American adults who use Wikipedia to look for information has increased from 25% in February 2007 to 42% in May 2010. This translates to 53% of adult internet users.

    Education level continues to be the strongest predictor of Wikipedia use. The collaborative encyclopedia is most popular among internet users with at least a college degree, 69% of whom use the site. Broadband use remains another predictor, as 59% of those with home broadband use the service, compared with 26% of those who connect to the internet through dial-up. Additionally, Wikipedia is generally more popular among those with annual household incomes of at least $50,000, as well as with young adults: 62% of internet users under the age of 30 using the service, compared with only 33% of internet users age 65 and older.

    In the scope of general online activities, using Wikipedia is more popular than sending instant messages (done by 47% of internet users) or rating a product, service, or person (32%), but is less popular than using social network sites (61%) or watching videos on sites like YouTube (66%).

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      8% of Online Americans Use Twitter

      Posted in Reports and White Papers, Social Media/Web 2.0 on December 9th, 2010

      The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released 8% of Online Americans Use Twitter.

      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

      Eight percent of the American adults who use the internet are Twitter users. Some of the groups who are notable for their relatively high levels of Twitter use include:

      • Young adults—Internet users ages 18-29 are significantly more likely to use Twitter than older adults.
      • African-Americans and Latinos—Minority internet users are more than twice as likely to use Twitter as are white internet users.
      • Urbanites—Urban residents are roughly twice as likely to use Twitter as rural dwellers.

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        A Standards-based, Open and Privacy-aware Social Web

        Posted in Social Media/Web 2.0, Standards on December 8th, 2010

        The W3C Incubator Group has released A Standards-based, Open and Privacy-aware Social Web.

        Here's an excerpt:

        The Social Web is a set of relationships that link together people over the Web. The Web is an universal and open space of information where every item of interest can be identified with a URI. While the best known current social networking sites on the Web limit themselves to relationships between people with accounts on a single site, the Social Web should extend across the entire Web. Just as people can call each other no matter which telephone provider they belong to, just as email allows people to send messages to each other irrespective of their e-mail provider, and just as the Web allows links to any website, so the Social Web should allow people to create networks of relationships across the entire Web, while giving people the ability to control their own privacy and data. The standards that enable this should be open and royalty-free. We present a framework for understanding the Social Web and the relevant standards (from both within and outside the W3C) in this report, and conclude by proposing a strategy for making the Social Web a "first-class citizen" of the Web.

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          "7 Things You Should Know about Privacy in Web 2.0 Learning Environments"

          Posted in Privacy, Social Media/Web 2.0 on September 13th, 2010

          The EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative has released "7 Things You Should Know about Privacy in Web 2.0 Learning Environments"

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          New media, social networking, collaboration sites, image and video-sharing sites, wikis, and blogs offer tremendous teaching and learning opportunities to educators and students, but their use raises concerns about privacy, especially as it relates to work that students are asked to complete as part of a course. New learning environments often leverage Web 2.0 or cloud-based tools that offer limited or no privacy protection. When they do, those privacy settings are frequently outside the control of either the institution or the faculty member. Nevertheless, FERPA places the burden of ensuring the privacy of the education record on the institution. Institutions are beginning to explore the connection between FERPA and student work along with their responsibilities in this area. Information and policy provided at the institutional level can help faculty members make choices about which tools to use and how to use them, and students should be educated about the risks of providing identifying personal information on third-party sites that may be public.

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            If You Build It, Will They Come? How Researchers Perceive and Use Web 2.0

            Posted in Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Communication, Social Media/Web 2.0 on July 7th, 2010

            The Research Information Network has released If You Build It, Will They Come? How Researchers Perceive and Use Web 2.0.

            Here's an excerpt:

            Over the past 15 years, the web has transformed the way we seek and use information. In the last 5 years in particular a set of innovative techniques—collectively termed 'web 2.0'—have enabled people to become producers as well as consumers of information.

            It has been suggested that these relatively easy-to-use tools, and the behaviours which underpin their use, have enormous potential for scholarly researchers, enabling them to communicate their research and its findings more rapidly, broadly and effectively than ever before.

            This report is based on a study commissioned by the Research Information Network to investigate whether such aspirations are being realised. It seeks to improve our currently limited understanding of whether, and if so how, researchers are making use of various web 2.0 tools in the course of their work, the factors that encourage or inhibit adoption, and researchers’ attitudes towards web 2.0 and other forms of communication.

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              Library of Congress to Archive All Public Tweets Since March 2006

              Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Research Libraries, Social Media/Web 2.0 on April 14th, 2010

              The Library of Congress has tweeted that it will to archive all public tweets made since March 2006.

              Here's an excerpt from the blog announcement:

              Have you ever sent out a "tweet" on the popular Twitter social media service? Congratulations: Your 140 characters or less will now be housed in the Library of Congress.

              That’s right. Every public tweet, ever, since Twitter’s inception in March 2006, will be archived digitally at the Library of Congress. That’s a LOT of tweets, by the way: Twitter processes more than 50 million tweets every day, with the total numbering in the billions.

              We thought it fitting to give the initial heads-up to the Twitter community itself via our own feed @librarycongress. (By the way, out of sheer coincidence, the announcement comes on the same day our own number of feed—followers has surpassed 50,000. I love serendipity!)

              We will also be putting out a press release later with even more details and quotes. Expect to see an emphasis on the scholarly and research implications of the acquisition. I'm no Ph.D., but it boggles my mind to think what we might be able to learn about ourselves and the world around us from this wealth of data. And I'm certain we'll learn things that none of us now can even possibly conceive.

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                ARL Goes Social, Now on Facebook, Flickr, Twitter, and YouTube

                Posted in ARL Libraries, Social Media/Web 2.0 on April 11th, 2010

                The Association of Research Libraries has begun to use a variety of social media tools, including blogs, Facebook, Flickr, Twitter, and YouTube.

                Here's an excerpt from the announcement :

                Twitter Twitter: Follow @ARLnews on Twitter for general news from ARL, including announcements of new activities, resources, and events. Follow @ARLpolicy on Twitter for tweets from ARL’s Public Policies program covering such issues as copyright & IP, federally funded research, the FDLP, and Net neutrality. Please use the Twitter hashtag #ARL10spr in any tweets about the upcoming Membership Meeting in Seattle.

                Facebook Facebook: Become a fan of ARL on Facebook to get our latest news and tell us what’s on your mind.

                YouTube YouTube: Watch our archived webcasts on our YouTube channel.

                Flickr Flickr: View photos from recent ARL events on our Flickr photostream.

                Tumblr Blogs: Learn about public policy issues that impact the research library community on the Policy Notes Blog. . . . Also join the discussion of library service assessment, evaluation, and improvement on the Library Assessment Blog.

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