Archive for the 'Social Media/Web 2.0' Category

Yahoo! Research: Who Says What to Whom on Twitter

Posted in Reports and White Papers, Social Media/Web 2.0 on March 30th, 2011

Yahoo! Research has released Who Says What to Whom on Twitter.

Here's an excerpt:

We study several longstanding questions in media communications research, in the context of the microblogging service Twitter, regarding the production, flow, and consumption of information. To do so, we exploit a recently introduced feature of Twitter—known as Twitter lists—to distinguish between elite users, by which we mean specifically celebrities, bloggers, and representatives of media outlets and other formal organizations, and ordinary users. Based on this classification, we find a striking concentration of attention on Twitter—roughly 50% of tweets consumed are generated by just 20K elite users—where the media produces the most information, but celebrities are the most followed. We also find significant homophily within categories: celebrities listen to celebrities, while bloggers listen to bloggers etc; however, bloggers in general rebroadcast more information than the other categories. Next we re-examine the classical "two-step flow" theory of communications, finding considerable support for it on Twitter, but also some interesting differences. Third, we find that URLs broadcast by different categories of users or containing different types of content exhibit systematically different lifespans. And finally, we examine the attention paid by the different user categories to different news topics.

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    "Standards for Web Applications on Mobile: February 2011 Current State and Roadmap"

    Posted in Emerging Technologies, Social Media/Web 2.0, Standards on February 27th, 2011

    W3C has released "Standards for Web Applications on Mobile: February 2011 Current State and Roadmap" by Dominique Hazaël-Massieux.

    Here's an excerpt:

    This document summarizes the various technologies developed in W3C that increases the power of Web applications, and how they apply more specifically to the mobile context, as of February 2011. . . .

    The features that these technologies add to the Web platform are organized under the following categories:

    • Graphics
    • Multimedia
    • Forms
    • User interactions
    • Data storage
    • Sensors and hardware integration
    • Network
    • Communication
    • Packaging
    • Performance & Optimization

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      Social Media: A Guide for Researchers

      Posted in Reports and White Papers, Social Media/Web 2.0 on February 13th, 2011

      The Research Information Network has released Social Media: A Guide for Researchers (see also "Web Materials 1: Links And Resources" and "Web Materials 2: Researcher Case Studies").

      Here's an excerpt:

      This guide will show how social media can change the ways in which you undertake research, and open up new forms of communication and dissemination. The researchers we interviewed in the development of this guide are using social media to bridge disciplinary boundaries, to engage in knowledge exchange with industry and policy makers, and to provide a channel for the public communication of their research.

      The guide is rooted in the practical experience of its authors and of the ten social media users we interviewed as part of the project. We are not trying to present social media as the answer to every problem a researcher might experience; rather, we want to give a "warts and all" picture. Social media have downsides as well as upsides, but on balance we hope that you will agree with us that there is real value for researchers.

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        Privacy Considerations in Cloud-Based Teaching and Learning Environments

        Posted in Cloud Computing/SaaS, Privacy, Reports and White Papers, Social Media/Web 2.0 on January 24th, 2011

        The EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative has released Privacy Considerations in Cloud-Based Teaching and Learning Environments.

        Here's an excerpt:

        In this white paper, we outline the privacy issues relevant to using cloud-based instructional tools or cloud-based teaching and learning environments for faculty members and those supporting instruction. Our discussion of how teaching and learning in an increasingly technological environment has transformed the way we interact and interpret FERPA will help inform various choices that institutions can consider to best address the law, including policy and best-practice examples. We highlight practical suggestions for how faculty members can continue to use innovative instructional strategies and engage students while considering privacy issues. Finally, this paper discusses ways to further explore and address privacy locally and includes a comprehensive resource list for further reading.

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          Wikipedia, Past and Present

          Posted in Reports and White Papers, Social Media/Web 2.0 on January 18th, 2011

          The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released Wikipedia, Past and Present.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          The percentage of all American adults who use Wikipedia to look for information has increased from 25% in February 2007 to 42% in May 2010. This translates to 53% of adult internet users.

          Education level continues to be the strongest predictor of Wikipedia use. The collaborative encyclopedia is most popular among internet users with at least a college degree, 69% of whom use the site. Broadband use remains another predictor, as 59% of those with home broadband use the service, compared with 26% of those who connect to the internet through dial-up. Additionally, Wikipedia is generally more popular among those with annual household incomes of at least $50,000, as well as with young adults: 62% of internet users under the age of 30 using the service, compared with only 33% of internet users age 65 and older.

          In the scope of general online activities, using Wikipedia is more popular than sending instant messages (done by 47% of internet users) or rating a product, service, or person (32%), but is less popular than using social network sites (61%) or watching videos on sites like YouTube (66%).

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            8% of Online Americans Use Twitter

            Posted in Reports and White Papers, Social Media/Web 2.0 on December 9th, 2010

            The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released 8% of Online Americans Use Twitter.

            Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

            Eight percent of the American adults who use the internet are Twitter users. Some of the groups who are notable for their relatively high levels of Twitter use include:

            • Young adults—Internet users ages 18-29 are significantly more likely to use Twitter than older adults.
            • African-Americans and Latinos—Minority internet users are more than twice as likely to use Twitter as are white internet users.
            • Urbanites—Urban residents are roughly twice as likely to use Twitter as rural dwellers.

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              A Standards-based, Open and Privacy-aware Social Web

              Posted in Social Media/Web 2.0, Standards on December 8th, 2010

              The W3C Incubator Group has released A Standards-based, Open and Privacy-aware Social Web.

              Here's an excerpt:

              The Social Web is a set of relationships that link together people over the Web. The Web is an universal and open space of information where every item of interest can be identified with a URI. While the best known current social networking sites on the Web limit themselves to relationships between people with accounts on a single site, the Social Web should extend across the entire Web. Just as people can call each other no matter which telephone provider they belong to, just as email allows people to send messages to each other irrespective of their e-mail provider, and just as the Web allows links to any website, so the Social Web should allow people to create networks of relationships across the entire Web, while giving people the ability to control their own privacy and data. The standards that enable this should be open and royalty-free. We present a framework for understanding the Social Web and the relevant standards (from both within and outside the W3C) in this report, and conclude by proposing a strategy for making the Social Web a "first-class citizen" of the Web.

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                "7 Things You Should Know about Privacy in Web 2.0 Learning Environments"

                Posted in Privacy, Social Media/Web 2.0 on September 13th, 2010

                The EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative has released "7 Things You Should Know about Privacy in Web 2.0 Learning Environments"

                Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                New media, social networking, collaboration sites, image and video-sharing sites, wikis, and blogs offer tremendous teaching and learning opportunities to educators and students, but their use raises concerns about privacy, especially as it relates to work that students are asked to complete as part of a course. New learning environments often leverage Web 2.0 or cloud-based tools that offer limited or no privacy protection. When they do, those privacy settings are frequently outside the control of either the institution or the faculty member. Nevertheless, FERPA places the burden of ensuring the privacy of the education record on the institution. Institutions are beginning to explore the connection between FERPA and student work along with their responsibilities in this area. Information and policy provided at the institutional level can help faculty members make choices about which tools to use and how to use them, and students should be educated about the risks of providing identifying personal information on third-party sites that may be public.

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