Librarian for Digital Technologies and Learning at NCSU

Posted in Digital Library Jobs on March 5th, 2010

The North Carolina State University Libraries are recruiting a Librarian for Digital Technologies and Learning.

Here's an excerpt from the ad (position number: 03603):

The Librarian for Digital Technologies and Learning provides research and instructional support and reference service for the NCSU Libraries' clientele. He or she collaborates with faculty members, other librarians, and instructional technologists to explore, develop, promote, and assess innovative online tools and services, including those targeting off-campus learners. With the Instructional Services Librarian and others, this position supports the creation of course- and curriculum-integrated web resources and identifies new and creative ways to enhance student learning and research skills. He or she participates in departmental and library planning; and serves on library-wide committees, task forces, and teams. NCSU Librarians are expected to be active professionally and to contribute to developments in the field. Reports to the Principal Librarian for Digital Technologies and Learning.

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    "GBS March Madness: Paths Forward for the Google Books Settlement"

    Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Books, Google and Other Search Engines, Mass Digitizaton, Publishing on March 5th, 2010

    The American Library Association, the Association of Research Libraries, and the Association of College and Research Libraries have released "GBS March Madness: Paths Forward for the Google Books Settlement."

    Here's an excerpt from the press release:

    This diagram, developed by Jonathan Band, explores the many possible routes and outcomes of the Google Books Settlement, including avenues into the litigation and appeals process.

    Now that the fairness hearing on the Google Books Settlement has occurred, it is up to Judge Chin to decide whether the amended settlement agreement (ASA), submitted to the Court by Google, the Authors Guild, and the Association of American Publishers, is "fair, reasonable, and adequate." As the diagram shows, however, Judge Chin’s decision is only the next step in a very complex legal proceeding that could take a dozen more turns before reaching resolution. Despite the complexity of the diagram, it does not reflect every possible twist in the case, nor does it address the substantive reasons why a certain outcome may occur or the impact of Congressional intervention through legislation. As Band states, "the precise way forward is more difficult to predict than the NCAA tournament. And although the next step in the GBS saga may occur this March, many more NCAA tournaments will come and go before the buzzer sounds on this dispute."

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      Systems and Electronic Services Librarian at Lebanon Valley College

      Posted in Library IT Jobs on March 5th, 2010

      The Lebanon Valley College Bishop Library is recruiting a Systems and Electronic Services Librarian.

      Here's an excerpt from the ad:

      Under direction of the Director of the Library, the Systems and Electronic Services Librarian provides oversight and leadership in the planning, implementation, integration, and maintenance of a broad range of library electronic services including the integrated library system (SirsiDynix Symphony), the Serials Solutions Knowledge base and 360 Suite, EZProxy, access to electronic databases, serials subscriptions and packages, and other third-party applications. The Systems and Electronic Services Librarian participates in the design and maintenance of the library web presence and also assists students, faculty, staff, and other library users with electronic systems and services and participates in reference service and library instruction.

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        SPARC: Campus-Based Open-Access Publishing Funds

        Posted in Open Access on March 5th, 2010

        SPARC has released Campus-Based Open-Access Publishing Funds.

        Here's an excerpt from the press release:

        SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) has released a new guide and supporting Web resource exploring campus-based open-access publishing funds. Authored by SPARC Consultant Greg Tananbaum, these timely new resources survey the current North American landscape of open-access funds and explore key emerging questions on how such funds are considered and developed on college and university campuses.

        Open-access funds are resources created to address article-processing fees (APCs) that may be associated with publishing in an open-access journal. These fees are a source of revenue for many open-access publishers (including the Public Library of Science, Hindawi, and the Optical Society of America), as well as for subscription-based publishers experimenting with "open choice" or "hybrid" options, where individual articles are made freely available with the upon payment of an APC.

        The new guide, "Open-access publishing funds: A practical guide to design and implementation," and Web resource contain a wealth of background information to inform libraries, authors, administrators and interested others on the practical considerations surrounding open-access funds. The site features up-to-date information on:

        • Active open-access funds (at the University of California at Berkeley, University of Calgary, and several other institutions);
        • FAQ for authors, administrators, and publishers;
        • Considerations in evaluating the launch of a fund;
        • Key policy decisions;
        • Implementation tools;
        • Resource allocation;
        • Fund promotion and reporting and more.

        To ensure that this resource stays current, readers are invited to contribute their experiences through the online commenting and discussion features that are available.

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          Digital Video: Peter Suber on the Future of Open Access

          Posted in Open Access on March 4th, 2010

          The Berkman Center for Internet and Society has made Peter Suber on the Future of Open Access available on YouTube.

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            Applications Programmer/Analyst Associate at University of Michigan

            Posted in Digital Library Jobs on March 4th, 2010

            The University of Michigan Library is recruiting an Applications Programmer/Analyst Associate (or Applications Programmer/Analyst Intermediate depending on qualifications). Salary range: $40,000-$60,000. Three-year term appointment (with the possibility of renewal).

            Here's an excerpt from the ad:

            DLPS [Digital Library Production Service] is looking for a talented, resourceful programmer to develop, maintain, document, and monitor software systems. Primary focus will be placed on developing highly reliable software tools for routine data processing on a large scale. Specific processing tasks include file format conversion, metadata insertion, transformation, validation, and transfer. Work includes assessing needs and specifying software requirements. Development of web interfaces for process management may be needed as well. Other tasks will vary but include, for example, preparing documentation and the development of digital library access systems, for example, DLXS (

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              Unintended Consequences: 12 Years Under the DMCA

              Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars on March 4th, 2010

              The Electronic Frontier Foundation has released Unintended Consequences: 12 Years Under the DMCA.

              Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

              EFF today released Unintended Consequences: 12 Years Under the DMCA. This is the sixth update to the report, which aims to catalog all the reported instances where the DMCA's ban on tampering with DRM have been abused to stymie fair use, free speech, and competition, rather than to attack "piracy."

              Congress enacted the DMCA's ban on bypassing DRM at the urging of entertainment industry lobbyists who argued that DRM backed by law would quell digital copyright infringement. Of course, 12 years later, that exactly hasn't worked out. Nor is it likely to ever work out. But lots of industries have recognized that these provisions of the DMCA are good for other things—like impeding scientific research and legitimate competition. The Unintended Consequences report collects these stories, including oldies like Lexmark's effort to block toner cartridge refilling and new cases like the lawsuit against RealDVD.

              Other new additions to the report include Apple's use of the DMCA to lock iPhone owners to Apple's own App Store for software, Apple's DMCA threats against Bluwiki for hosting discussions about iPod interoperability, and Texas Instruments' use of the DMCA to threaten calculator hobbyists trying to write their own operating systems.

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                Programmer/Analyst, Digital Library Tools at Indiana University

                Posted in Digital Library Jobs on March 4th, 2010

                The Indiana University Libraries are recruiting a Programmer/Analyst, Digital Library Tools.

                Here's an excerpt from the ad:

                Participates in the development and management of IU’s digital repository system (based on the Fedora open source software platform) and associated software tools for ingestion, management, and delivery of digital library content. Designs, evaluates, programs, and implements Web-based software tools supporting access to and ingestion of digital library collections. Works with other Digital Library Programs and IU staff to define requirements for tools to support delivery of image, text, audio, video, and data collections; evaluates potential commercial and open-source solutions; designs and tests user interfaces; designs, codes, and tests software; and defines and implements interfaces with other IU systems.

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                  DSpace 1.6 Released

                  Posted in Digital Repositories, DSpace, DuraSpace, Institutional Repositories on March 4th, 2010

                  DuraSpace has released DSpace 1.6.

                  Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                  Community-requested features in the new release include an enhanced statistics package which provides more information about how your repository is being used, an embargo facility so items can be kept dark for a period of time, and a batch metadata editing tool which can be used to change, add, find/replace metadata as well as facilitate mass moves, re-order values or add new items in bulk. And there’s more such as authority control which contains an integration with the Sherpa Romeo Service for publisher names, as well as the Library of Congress Nameservice. Other new features include:

                  • Delegated administration
                  • OpenSearch
                  • Command launcher
                  • OAI-PMH harvesting of items from remote repositories
                  • Configurable OAI-PMH dublin core output
                  • Move item functionality in XMLUI
                  • If-Modified-Since / Last-Modified header support in XMLUI
                  • Change to logging behaviour to ensure better log retention and management
                  • Update to the latest handle server library
                  • Ability to perform batch imports and exports from zip files of items
                  • New test scripts to test database and email settings
                  • Ability to set legal jurisdiction in creative commons licensing
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                    Duke University Draft Open Access Policy

                    Posted in Open Access on March 3rd, 2010

                    Duke University's Digital Futures Task Force has written a "Draft Discussion Document for Duke Open Access Policy" for consideration.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    Each Faculty member grants to Duke University permission to make available his or her scholarly articles and to reproduce and distribute those articles for the purpose of open dissemination. In legal terms, each Faculty member grants to Duke University a nonexclusive, irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide license to exercise any and all rights under copyright relating to each of his or her scholarly articles, in any medium, and to authorize others to do so, provided that the articles are not sold. The Duke faculty author remains the copyright owner unless that author chooses to transfer the copyright to a publisher.

                    The policy will apply to all scholarly articles authored or co-authored while the person is a member of the Faculty except for any articles completed before the adoption of this policy and any articles for which the Faculty member entered into an incompatible licensing or assignment agreement before the adoption of this policy. The Provost or Provost's designate will waive application of the license for a particular article or delay access for a specified period of time upon written request by a Faculty member.

                    To assist the University in distributing the scholarly articles, each faculty member will make available, as of the date of publication or upon request, an electronic copy of the final author’s version of the article at no charge to a designated representative of the Provost’s Office in an appropriate format (such as PDF) specified by the Provost's Office. The Provost's Office will make the article available to the public in Duke’s open-access repository. In cases where the Duke license has been waived or an embargo period has been mutually agreed, the article may be archived in a Duke repository without open access for the period of the embargo, or permanently in cases of waiver.

                    Read more about it at "Information Wants to Be Sustainable."

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                      Digital Services Specialist at University of Bridgeport

                      Posted in Digital Library Jobs on March 3rd, 2010

                      The University of Bridgeport is recruiting a Digital Services Specialist.

                      Here's an excerpt from the ad:

                      This position resides within a combined Wahlstrom Library, Office of Information Technology, Projects Office, and Media Services organization that reports to the AVP Information Technology and CIO. The Associate University Librarian provides key direction on library matters. The Digital Services Specialist collaborates closely with academic faculty and administrative staff to manage lifecycle development, storage and use of digital content.

                      Responsibilities include researching emergent applications, implementing technologies, assessment, and instruction for University students, faculty and staff in new technology, tools and resources for digitally-mediated or digitally-delivered content services. This includes working with the ExLibris software suite of Primo, Metalib, sfx; maintaining the Library Web interfaces; working with the University Web Manager to develop content management schema for the University Web, Datatel Portal, Datatel Active Admissions, digital signage; technology support for Information Literacy initiatives, including use of the Blackboard CMS, podcasting, and Wimba; developing a new institutional repository service; the integration of handheld devices into the library service environment; overall Web content management; collaborating with the Library metadata specialist on online knowledge base development, will also work closely with library staff, and support library functions as needed.

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                        "The Amended Google Books Settlement is Still Exclusive"

                        Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Books, Google and Other Search Engines, Mass Digitizaton, Publishing on March 3rd, 2010

                        James Grimmelmann has self-archived "The Amended Google Books Settlement is Still Exclusive" in SSRN.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        This brief essay argues that the proposed settlement in the Google Books case, although formally non-exclusive, would have the practical effect of giving Google an exclusive license to a large number of books. The settlement itself does not create mechanisms for Google's competitors to obtain licenses to orphan books and competitors are unlikely to be able to obtain similar settlements of their own. Recent amendments to the settlement do not change this conclusion.

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