Scholarly Communication Librarian at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is recruiting a Scholarly Communication Librarian.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The Hunt Library, located on the Daytona Beach Campus of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU), seeks a Scholarly Communication Librarian to manage the development of Open Educational Resources (OER) for the residential Daytona Beach Campus and the distance learning Worldwide Campus. Responsibilities include outreach and training for faculty interested in adopting OERs, coordinating liaison librarians to support faculty adoption of OERs, providing reference service on a limited basis, and participating in collection development.

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"Do Open Educational Resources Improve Student Learning? Implications of the Access Hypothesis"

Phillip J. Grimaldi et al. have published "Do Open Educational Resources Improve Student Learning? Implications of the Access Hypothesis" in PLoS ONE.

Here's an excerpt:

Open Educational Resources (OER) have been lauded for their ability to reduce student costs and improve equity in higher education. Research examining whether OER provides learning benefits have produced mixed results, with most studies showing null effects. We argue that the common methods used to examine OER efficacy are unlikely to detect positive effects based on predictions of the access hypothesis. The access hypothesis states that OER benefits learning by providing access to critical course materials, and therefore predicts that OER should only benefit students who would not otherwise have access to the materials. Through the use of simulation analysis, we demonstrate that even if there is a learning benefit of OER, standard research methods are unlikely to detect it.

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Scholarly Communications Librarian at Thomas Jefferson University

Thomas Jefferson University is recruiting a Scholarly Communications Librarian.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The Scholarly Communications Librarian develops and implements library initiatives in support of digital scholarship and publishing by the Jefferson community. The Scholarly Communications Librarian works closely with other Library and CTL staff to facilitate the use of Library and CTL resources and services for digital scholarship creation by faculty and students. He/she presents workshops and other programming on digital tools, digital scholarship and data management best practices to faculty, students and researchers.

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"How to Fight Fair Use Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt: The Experience of One Open Educational Resource"

Lindsey Weeramuni has published "How to Fight Fair Use Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt: The Experience of One Open Educational Resource" in The Journal of Copyright in Education and Librarianship.

Here's an excerpt:

At the launch of one of the early online open educational resources (OER) in 2002, the approach to addressing copyright was uncertain. Did the university or the faculty own their material? How would the third-party material be handled? Was all of its use considered fair use under Section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Act (Title 17, United States Code) because of its educational purpose? Or was permission-seeking necessary for this project to succeed and protect the integrity of faculty and university? For many years, this OER was conservative in its approach to third-party material, avoiding making fair use claims on the theory that it was too risky and difficult to prove in the face of an infringement claim. Additionally, being one of the early projects of its kind, there was fear of becoming a target for ambitious copyright holders wanting to make headlines (and perhaps win lawsuits). It was not until 2009 that the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for OpenCourseWare was written by a community of practitioners who believed that if fair use worked for documentary film makers, video creators, and others (including big media), it worked in open education as well. Once this Code was adopted, universities and institutions were able to offer more rich and complete course content to their users than before. This paper explains how it happened at this early open educational resource offering.

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Data Librarian at Congressional Research Service

The Congressional Research Service is recruiting a Data Librarian.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

he data librarian performs duties related to data acquisition, data curation and data management. This includes identifying and locating authoritative data sets used across CRS, recommending appropriate metadata schemas and workflows to describe, document, annotate and catalog data sets to enable discovery and re-use. The data librarian participates in the development of data repositories and data catalogs to store and archive data sets for long term access, and develops and maintains best practices and procedures.

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"Seeking, Reading, and Use of Scholarly Articles: An International Study of Perceptions and Behavior of Researchers"

Carol Tenopir, Lisa Christian, and Jordan Kaufman have published "Seeking, Reading, and Use of Scholarly Articles: An International Study of Perceptions and Behavior of Researchers" in Publications.

Here's an excerpt:

While journal articles are still considered the most important sources of scholarly reading, libraries may no longer have a monopoly on providing discovery and access. Many other sources of scholarly information are available to readers. This international study examines how researchers discover, read, and use scholarly literature for their work. Respondents in 2018 report an average of almost 20 article readings a month and there are still significant differences found in the reading and use of scholarly literature by discipline and geographical location, consistent with the earlier studies. Researchers show they are willing to change or adopt new strategies to discover and obtain articles.

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Systems Engineer at Columbia University

Columbia University is recruiting a Systems Engineer.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

Reporting to the Senior Systems Engineer, the Systems Engineer will design, develop and deploy Unix server and storage systems and perform maintenance and security updates as required. Additionally, the incumbent will document and provide support for a variety of innovative projects and services within the Libraries as well as collaborate on specialized projects with various departments across the organization as needed.

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"From Finch to Plan S: and You May Ask Yourself, Well How Did I Get Here?"

Frank Manista and Graham Stone have edited "From Finch to Plan S: and You May Ask Yourself, Well How Did I Get Here?" in Insights.

Here's an excerpt:

We have gone through the catalogue of previously published articles to give an interesting overview of what has been happening at the coalface since the Finch report. Post Finch, Sykes suggested that 'there is nothing inevitable about the triumph of open access'. The bigger picture that emerges from the articles is certainly that a great deal of effort and compromise have brought us to a place much closer to the end-game than we were back in 2012. However, as the various articles show, there is a great diversity of thought on how to get to where we think we ought to be. There is a value in healthy debate, particularly when there is the benefit that OA can bring. In the days leading up to the Plan S announcement, articles in Insights signalled a more urgent tone (Earney, 2018; Lundén, Smith and Wideberg, 2018) as things were not moving fast enough in navigating the bumpy golden road towards OA (Otegem, Wennström and Hormia-Poutanen, 2018). This is something that cOAlition-S explicitly targeted. Finally, Johnson (2019) brings the special collection to a close with a round-up of the immediate aftermath post Plan S. Like you, we await the next chapter.

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Web Applications Developer at University of Michigan

The University of Michigan is recruiting a Web Applications Developer.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

We are seeking a Web Applications Developer who will help create and maintain web applications across the University of Michigan Library’s web presence. The successful candidate will work as part of a team with front-end developers, user experience specialists, designers, and stakeholders on projects that help users discover, access, and use library resources, services, and expertise. Current major initiatives include a library website redesign and ongoing development of Library Search, a discovery interface for library resources.

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"Another Brick in the Paywall: The Popularity and Privacy Implications of Paywalls"

Panagiotis Papadopoulos, Peter Snyder, and Benjamin Livshits have self-archived "Another Brick in the Paywall: The Popularity and Privacy Implications of Paywalls."

Here's an excerpt:

Funding the production and distribution of quality online content is an open problem for content producers. Selling subscriptions to content, once considered passe, has been growing in popularity recently. Decreasing revenues from digital advertising, along with increasing ad fraud, have driven publishers to "lock" their content behind paywalls, thus denying access to non-subscribed users. How much do we know about the technology that may obliterate what we know as free web? What is its prevalence? How does it work? Is it better than ads when it comes to user privacy? How well is the premium content of publishers protected? In this study, we aim to address all the above by building a paywall detection mechanism and performing the first full-scale analysis of real-world paywall systems. Our results show that the prevalence of paywalls across the top sites in Great Britain reach 4.2%, in Australia 4.1%, in France 3.6% and globally 7.6%. We find that paywall use is especially pronounced among news sites, and that 33.4% of sites in the Alexa 1k ranking for global news sites have adopted paywalls. Further, we see a remarkable 25% of paywalled sites outsourcing their paywall functionality (including user tracking and access control enforcement) to third-parties. Putting aside the significant privacy concerns, these paywall deployments can be easily circumvented, and are thus mostly unable to protect publisher content.

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Project Manager at University of Notre Dame

The University of Notre Dame is recruiting a Project Manager.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

You'll join the Hesburgh Libraries at University of Notre Dame as a Project Manager in the Digital Initiatives and Scholarship Program, and a team of Project Managers serving the wider Hesburgh Libraries. We are solution engineers, research partners, consultants, and explorers in the ever-evolving digital scholarship services and community landscape. We develop solutions for digital workflows, preservation, and discovery of collections and research data.

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"The Ecosystem of Repository Migration"

Juliet L. Hardesty and Nicholas Homenda have published "The Ecosystem of Repository Migration" in Publications.

Here's an excerpt:

Indiana University was an early adopter of the Fedora repository, developing it as a home for heterogeneous digital library content from a variety of collections with unique content models. After joining the Hydra Project, now known as Samvera, in 2012, development progressed on a variety of applications that formed the foundation for digital library services using the Fedora 4 repository. These experiences have shaped migration planning to move from Fedora 3 to Fedora 4 for this large and inclusive set of digital content. Moving to Fedora 4 is not just a repository change; it is an ecosystem shift. End user interfaces for access, management systems for collection managers, and data structures are all impacted. This article shares what Indiana University has learned about migrating to Fedora 4 to help others work through their own migration considerations. This article is also meant to inspire the Fedora repository development community to offer ways to further ease migration work, sustaining Fedora users moving forward, and inviting new Fedora users to try the software and become involved in the community.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 9 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

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