Archive for the 'Digital Culture' Category

Who’s in the Queue? A Demographic Analysis of Public Access Computer Users and Uses in U.S. Public Libraries

Posted in Digital Culture, Libraries, Reports and White Papers on July 4th, 2011

The Institute of Museum and Library Services has released Who's in the Queue? A Demographic Analysis of Public Access Computer Users and Uses in U.S. Public Libraries.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

Public access computers in U.S. public libraries continue to be in high demand according to Who's in the Queue: Public Access Computer Users, a new research brief by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). The report dispels some myths that have lingered regarding the target service population for public access computers in U.S. public libraries. It also provides a demographic analysis of public access computer users and uses and demonstrates that public libraries are providing much more than basic technology access. . . .

This newly released research brief relies on data compiled for U.S. Impact Study, which was conducted by the University of Washington in summer of 2009 and funded by IMLS and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The mixed method national survey was administered at the point-of-service in public libraries across the country via a web-based tool and as a national household survey. There were over 48,000 respondents to the study in the public data file. This data set provides information on the demographics of respondents and the nature of their public access computer use.

The brief also analyzed data from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly survey of households conducted by the Bureau of Census for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. It provides a comprehensive body of data on the labor force, employment, unemployment, persons not in the labor force, hours of work, earnings, and other demographic and labor force characteristics. The 2009 computer use data was collected through a supplement to the CPS. The survey has included questions on Internet use since 1997.

| Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Electronic Theses and Dissertations Bibliography | Google Books Bibliography | Institutional Repository Bibliography | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

Social Networking Sites and Our Lives

Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers, Social Media on June 16th, 2011

The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released Social Networking Sites and Our Lives.

Here's an excerpt:

Questions have been raised about the social impact of widespread use of social networking sites (SNS) like Facebook, LinkedIn, MySpace, and Twitter. Do these technologies isolate people and truncate their relationships? Or are there benefits associated with being connected to others in this way? The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project decided to examine SNS in a survey that explored people’s overall social networks and how use of these technologies is related to trust, tolerance, social support, and community and political engagement.

| Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 |

Report on the Step Forward iPad Pilot Project

Posted in Digital Culture, Emerging Technologies, Reports and White Papers on March 8th, 2011

The University of Melbourne's Trinity College has released Report on the Step Forward iPad Pilot Project.

Here's an excerpt:

KEY FINDINGS:

  • Pilot project staff and August Entry students overwhelmingly recommend iPads for use by other TCFS staff and students: 76.2% of staff and 80% of students
  • iPads are effective, durable, reliable and achieve their educational aims of going further, faster and with more fun
  • iPads have advantages for TCFS over other technologies such as netbooks and laptops
  • iPads are not a replacement for desktop/laptop computers or other educational technologies but are an enhancement
  • High quality audio-visual equipment in the classroom (such as flat screen TV monitors and document cameras), along with timely IT support, are required to enable full integration and best use of the iPads. Such equipment and support are crucial if the educational aims of iPad use are to be realised rather than thwarted
  • iPad use reduces printing and paper use

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Cisco Visual Networking Index: Global Mobile Data Traffic Forecast Update, 2010-2015

Posted in Digital Culture, Emerging Technologies, Reports and White Papers on March 2nd, 2011

Cisco has released Cisco Visual Networking Index: Global Mobile Data Traffic Forecast Update, 2010-2015.

Here's an excerpt:

Global mobile data traffic will increase 26-fold between 2010 and 2015. . . .

There will be nearly one mobile device per capita by 2015. . . .

Mobile network connection speeds will increase 10-fold by 2015. . . .

Mobile-connected tablets will generate as much traffic in 2015 as the entire global mobile network in 2010.

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Generations and Their Gadgets

Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers on February 6th, 2011

The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released Generations and Their Gadgets.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Many devices have become popular across generations, with a majority now owning cell phones, laptops and desktop computers. . . .

  • Cell phones are by far the most popular device among American adults. Some 85% of adults own cell phones, and 90% of all adults—including 62% of those age 75 and older—live in a household with at least one working cell phone.
  • Desktop computers are most popular with adults ages 35-65, and Millennials are the only generation that is more likely to own a laptop computer or netbook than a desktop: 70% own a laptop, compared with 57% who own a desktop.
  • Almost half of all adults own an iPod or other mp3 player, but these are still most popular with Millennials—74% of adults ages 18-34 own an mp3 player, compared with only 56% of the next oldest generation, Gen X (ages 35-46).
  • Game consoles are uniformly popular with all adults ages 18-46, 63% of whom own these devices.
  • Overall, 5% of adults own an e-book reader, and 4% own an iPad or other tablet computer.

| Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

The Rise of Apps Culture

Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers on September 14th, 2010

The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released The Rise of Apps Culture.

Here's an excerpt:

The most recent Pew Internet Project survey asked a national sample of 1,917 cell phone-using adults if they use apps and how they use them. Broadly, the results indicate that while apps are popular among a segment of the adult cell phone using population, a notable number of cell owners are not yet part of the emerging apps culture.. . .

Of the 82% of adults today who are cell phone users, 43% have software applications or "apps" on their phones. When taken as a portion of the entire U.S. adult population, that equates to 35% who have cell phones with apps. . . .

Yet having apps and using apps are not synonymous. Of those who have apps on their phones, only about two-thirds of this group (68%) actually use that software. Overall, that means that 24% of U.S. adults are active apps users. Older adult cell phone users in particular do not use the apps that are on their phones, and one in ten adults with a cell phone (11%) are not even sure if their phone is equipped with apps.

FCC: Internet Access Services: Status as of June 2009

Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers on September 6th, 2010

The Federal Communications Commission has released Internet Access Services: Status as of June 2009.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

Report highlights include the following, as of June 2009:

  • Out of a total of 71 million fixed – as opposed to mobile – connections to households, only 44% met or exceeded the speed tier that most closely approximates the universal availability target set in the National Broadband Plan of 4 megabits per second (Mbps) downstream and 1 Mbps upstream
  • The number of mobile wireless service subscribers with data plans for full Internet access increased by 40% over the first six months of 2009, to 35 million
  • Cable modem connections increased by 3% to 41 million and aDSL by 1% to 31 million in the first six months of 2009
  • A 23% increase in fiber connections, to 4 million, was the largest rate of increase among fixed-location technologies
  • Satellite Internet connections increased by 6% to 1 million

Mobile Strategy Report, Mobile Device User Research

Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers on September 2nd, 2010

The California Digital Library has released Mobile Strategy Report, Mobile Device User Research.

Here's an excerpt:

This report is a collection of findings and recommendations from a mobile device user research project conducted in the summer of 2010. The California Digital Library undertook this project for three reasons:

  1. CDL wanted to understand how the proliferation of mobile devices with internet access in the general public and the explosion of mobile tools and products in higher education and libraries affect CDL constituents and services.
  2. UC campus libraries expressed a need for guidance regarding mobile access.
  3. CDL programs were trying to understand if they needed to support users in a mobile capacity and if there were opportunities for new ways to meet user needs.

In order to answer these questions, we performed an extensive literature review and conducted user research. The literature review helped us to clarify what is happening in the mobile world in terms of technology changes, device ownership, internet access, and mobile projects, especially within the higher education and library spheres.

We wanted to learn additional details about the role mobile devices play in the lives of CDL constituents. Very little literature focuses on academic populations in regard to mobile devices, and even then it usually focuses on undergraduate students. We wanted to expand this study to faculty, graduate students, and academic librarians. We sought information about the kinds of devices users owned, how they used mobile devices with internet, and what kinds of preferences and frustrations they encounter while using mobile devices as part of their academic lives.

Based on these findings, we developed both specific and general strategic recommendations in order to guide CDL in supporting and developing mobile access to its services.

Read more about it at "All Things Mobile."

Older Adults and Social Media: Social Networking Use among Those Ages 50 and Older Nearly Doubled over the Past Year

Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers on August 29th, 2010

The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released Older Adults and Social Media: Social Networking Use among Those Ages 50 and Older Nearly Doubled over the Past Year.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

While social media use has grown dramatically across all age groups, older users have been especially enthusiastic over the past year about embracing new networking tools. Social networking use among internet users ages 50 and older nearly doubled—from 22% in April 2009 to 42% in May 2010.

  • Between April 2009 and May 2010, social networking use among internet users ages 50-64 grew by 88%—from 25% to 47%.
  • During the same period, use among those ages 65 and older grew 100%—from 13% to 26%.
  • By comparison, social networking use among users ages 18-29 grew by 13%—from 76% to 86%.

Mobile Access 2010

Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers on July 14th, 2010

The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released Mobile Access 2010

Here's an excerpt:

Six in ten American adults are now wireless internet users, and mobile data applications have grown more popular over the last year.

As of May 2010, 59% of all adult Americans go online wirelessly. Our definition of a wireless internet user includes the following activities:

  • Going online with a laptop using a wi-fi connection or mobile broadband card. Roughly half of all adults (47%) go online in this way, up from the 39% who did so at a similar point in 2009.
  • Use the internet, email or instant messaging on a cell phone. Two in five adults (40%) do at least one of these using a mobile device, an increase from the 32% of adults who did so in 2009.

Taken together, 59% of American adults now go online wirelessly using either a laptop or cell phone, an increase over the 51% of Americans who did so at a similar point in 2009.

Millennials Will Make Online Sharing in Networks a Lifelong Habit

Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers on July 11th, 2010

The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released Millennials Will Make Online Sharing in Networks a Lifelong Habit.

Here's an excerpt:

In a survey about the future impact of the internet, a solid majority of technology experts and stakeholders said the Millennial generation will lead society into a new world of personal disclosure and information-sharing using new media. These experts said the communications patterns "digital natives" have already embraced through their use of social networking technology and other social technology tools will carry forward even as Millennials age, form families, and move up the economic ladder.

The State of Online Video

Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers on June 6th, 2010

The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released The State of Online Video.

Here's an excerpt:

On the other side of the camera, video creation has now become a notable feature of online life. One in seven adult internet users (14%) have uploaded a video to the internet, almost double the 8% who were uploading video in 2007. Home video is far and away the most popular content posted online, shared by 62% of video uploaders. And uploaders are just as likely to share video on social networking sites like Facebook (52% do this) as they are on more specialized video-sharing sites like YouTube (49% do this).

Yet, while video-sharing is growing in popularity, adult internet users have mixed feelings about how broadly they want to share their own creations. While 31% of uploaders say they “always” place restrictions on who can access their videos, 50% say they “never” restrict access. The remaining 19% fall somewhere in the middle. And while there is almost universal appreciation for the ease with which video-sharing sites allow uploaders to share video with family and friends, a considerable number (35%) also feel they should be more careful about what they post.

Users' Trust in Information Resources in the Web Environment: A Status Report

Posted in Digital Culture on May 9th, 2010

JISC has released Users' Trust in Information Resources in the Web Environment: A Status Report.

Here's an excerpt:

This study brings together the e-commerce, e-health and information trust literature to provide a broader picture of what is already known around issues of trust in the use of Web resources within Higher Education (HE). Herring (2005) believes the first aspect of teaching information seeking skills is to teach students how to evaluate the information they have found; he believes that "Information literacy is now regarded by governments across the world as a core educational and life skill, and schools have a key role to play in developing their student's information literacy" (Herring 2005: 91). The JISC JUBILEE project found that "Most students do not evaluate the information they retrieve electronically" (Banwell et al 2003). Rowlands et al (2008) found that young people are "unable to construct effective searches and evaluate the results. . . due to their lack of knowledge of the kinds of information content that exists." If there is an inability or lack of perceived need to evaluate Web resources, how are choices made relating to trust." Young people feel at ease in many virtual environments but this does not necessarily mean they are equally at ease in all virtual worlds, they are, however, acutely aware of the limitations and potential pitfalls surrounding internet use. Rather than being discouraged from over-dependence on the internet, what learners need are the tools to allow them to use the internet to their best advantages. These tools are not ICT skills, navigating a keyboard is vastly different from navigating the choppy waters of cyberspace (Pickard 2008). A key dimension of trust is the belief in ability; the expertise, skills or technical ability that another has in a certain area (Ridings & Gefen 2005). This aspect of the study focuses on identifying and assessing evidence to examine the choices individuals make based on trust and confidence within the Web environment.

Opportunity for All: How the American Public Benefits from Internet Access at U.S. Libraries

Posted in Digital Culture, Libraries on March 29th, 2010

The University of Washington Information School has released Opportunity for All: How the American Public Benefits from Internet Access at U.S. Libraries.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

Nearly one-third of Americans age 14 or older—roughly 77 million people—used a public library computer or wireless network to access the Internet in the past year, according to a national report released today. In 2009, as the nation struggled through a recession, people relied on library technology to find work, apply for college, secure government benefits, learn about critical medical treatments, and connect with their communities.

The report, Opportunity for All: How the American Public Benefits from Internet Access at U.S. Libraries, is based on the first, large-scale study of who uses public computers and Internet access in public libraries, the ways library patrons use this free technology service, why they use it, and how it affects their lives. It was conducted by the University of Washington Information School and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. . . .

The report's findings are based on nearly 50,000 surveys—including 3,176 from a national telephone survey and 44,881 web survey responses—from patrons of more than 400 public libraries across the country.

Next Generation Connectivity: A Review of Broadband Internet Transitions and Policy from Around the World

Posted in Digital Culture on February 25th, 2010

The Berkman Center for Internet & Society has released Next Generation Connectivity: A Review of Broadband Internet Transitions and Policy from Around the World.

Here's an excerpt:

Our most prominent initial findings, confirmed and extended in this final draft, were that U.S. broadband performance in the past decade has declined relative to other countries and is no better than middling. Our study expanded the well known observation with regard to penetration per 100 inhabitants, and examined and found the same to be true of penetration per household; subscriptions for mobile broadband; availability of nomadic access; as well as advertised speeds and actually measured speeds; and pricing at most tiers of service. Our study further identified the great extent to which open access policies played a role in establishing competitive broadband markets during the first-generation broadband transition in Europe and Japan, and the large degree to which contemporary transpositions of that experience were being integrated into current plans to preserve and assure competitive markets during the next generation transition.

Digital Nation: 21st Century America's Progress Towards Universal Broadband Internet Access

Posted in Digital Culture on February 22nd, 2010

The Department of Commerce's National Telecommunications and Information Administration has released Digital Nation: 21st Century America's Progress Towards Universal Broadband Internet Access.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

  • Broadband Internet access at home continues to grow: 64 percent of households have broadband access compared to 51 percent in October 2007.
  • Notable disparities between demographic groups continue: people with low incomes, seniors, minorities, the less-educated, non-family households, and the non-employed tend to lag behind other groups in home broadband use.
  • While the digital divide between urban and rural areas has lessened since 2007, it remains significant. In 2009, two-thirds (66 percent) of urban households and only 54 percent of rural households accessed broadband Internet service, compared to 54 percent of urban households and 39 percent of rural households in 2007.
  • Overall, the two most commonly cited reasons for not having broadband Internet access at home are that it is perceived as not needed (38 percent) or too expensive (26 percent). Besides these value and affordability concerns, Americans also cite the lack of a computer as a major factor.  In rural America, however, lack of broadband availability is a more frequently-cited major reason for non-adoption than in urban areas (11 percent vs. 1 percent).
  • Americans who do not use the Internet in any location most commonly cite insufficient value, or no need, as the reason.  In contrast,  households that have dial-up access to the Internet as well as households without any type of Internet access at home most frequently cite cost as the reason they do not have broadband access at home.
  • Despite the growing importance of the Internet in American life, 30 percent of all persons do not use the Internet in any location.

The Future of the Internet IV

Posted in Digital Culture on February 21st, 2010

The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released The Future of the Internet IV.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The web-based survey gathered opinions from prominent scientists, business leaders, consultants, writers and technology developers. It is the fourth in a series of Internet expert studies conducted by the Imagining the Internet Center at Elon University and the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project. In this report, we cover experts' thoughts on the following issues:

How Much Information? 2009 Report on American Consumers

Posted in Digital Culture on December 10th, 2009

The Global Information Industry Center at UCSD has released How Much Information? 2009 Report on American Consumers.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

In 2008, Americans consumed information for about 1.3 trillion hours, an average of almost 12 hours per day. Consumption totaled 3.6 zettabytes and 10,845 trillion words, corresponding to 100,500 words and 34 gigabytes for an average person on an average day. A zettabyte is 10 to the 21st power bytes, a million million gigabytes. These estimates are from an analysis of more than 20 different sources of information, from very old (newspapers and books) to very new (portable computer games, satellite radio, and Internet video). Information at work is not included. . . .

Hours of information consumption grew at 2.6 percent per year from 1980 to 2008, due to a combination of population growth and increasing hours per capita, from 7.4 to 11.8. More surprising is that information consumption in bytes increased at only 5.4 percent per year. Yet the capacity to process data has been driven by Moore's Law, rising at least 30 percent per year. One reason for the slow growth in bytes is that color TV changed little over that period. High-definition TV is increasing the number of bytes in TV programs, but slowly.

The traditional media of radio and TV still dominate our consumption per day, with a total of 60 percent of the hours. In total, more than three-quarters of U.S. households' information time is spent with non-computer sources.

Despite this, computers have had major effects on some aspects of information consumption. In the past, information consumption was overwhelmingly passive, with telephone being the only interactive medium. Thanks to computers, a full third of words and more than half of bytes are now received interactively. Reading, which was in decline due to the growth of television, tripled from 1980 to 2008, because it is the overwhelmingly preferred way to receive words on the Internet.

Information Economy Report 2009: Trends and Outlook in Turbulent Times

Posted in Digital Culture on November 4th, 2009

The United Nations Conference on Trade and Development has released Information Economy Report 2009: Trends and Outlook in Turbulent Times.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Contents:

  • Global and regional trends in the diffusion of ICTs such as fixed and mobile telecommunications, Internet, and broadband
  • Ranking of the most dynamic economies in terms of increased ICT connectivity between 2003 and 2008
  • Monitoring of the “digital divide”
  • Survey of national statistical offices on the use of ICT in the business sector
  • A review of the changing patterns in the trade of ICT goods
  • A mapping of the new geography in the offshoring of IT and ICT-enabled services.
  • Policy recommendations on how developing countries can reap greater benefits from ICT
  • A statistical annex with global ICT data.

The Internet in Britain 2009

Posted in Digital Culture on June 24th, 2009

The Oxford Internet Institute of the University of Oxford has released The Internet in Britain 2009.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

One of the main challenges in creating a Digital Britain will be to change the perceptions of the third of the British population who choose not to use the internet, according to the latest in a series of Oxford University Surveys.

The Oxford Internet Survey (OxIS) 2009, published on 22 June 2009, shows that while most British internet users (84%) are extremely confident about using new technology and see the Internet as central to many activities, over half of non-users of the internet (57%) now distrust new technology more than they did before.

The survey, conducted by the Oxford Internet Institute, questioned 2000 people in 2009 and found that cost, a lack of access and a lack of interest were the main reasons that led to people deciding to stop using the Internet. OxIS 2009 provides a detailed breakdown of where the digital divide lies: twice as many people from higher than lower socio-economic groups use the Internet. Age too has a dramatic impact on digital choices with the proportion of Internet users between 25-54 increasing considerably since 2003, but not changing significantly for other age groups. The proportion of retired people going online has inched forward from 30% in 2005 to 34% in 2009. However, the gap between male and female users has nearly closed with 71% of men and 68% women now using the Internet; gaps in self-confidence between men and women, however, remain. 100% of students and 88% of households with children said they had access to the Internet.

OxIS 2009 concludes that the Internet is a valuable resource for people to find information, communicate with others, and find entertainment 'in ways that could well give advantages to them over those who choose not to use the Internet'. The 'Digital Britain Report' (published by the UK Government on 16 June 2009) contains pledges to provide universal access to a broadband connection, but according to OxIS Principal Investigator, Professor William Dutton, the heart of the matter is about persuading those who choose to exclude themselves. . . .

While users opt for the Internet as their most trusted medium, non-users or people who have stopped said they trusted television and radio the most. Non-users were most concerned about the negative aspects of online communication, with 86% agreeing that people can find personal information too easily online, as compared with only half of users. Over two-thirds (68%) of non-users said that there was too much immoral material online and nearly three quarters (71%) of non-users wanted greater government regulation of the Internet, as compared with 57% of users.

See also "Digital Britain: The Final Report."

Home Broadband Adoption 2009

Posted in Digital Culture on June 18th, 2009

The Pew Internet & American Life Project has released Home Broadband Adoption 2009.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

An April 2009 survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project shows 63% of adult Americans now have broadband internet connections at home, a 15% increase from a year earlier. April’s level of high-speed adoption represents a significant jump from figures gathered by the Project since the end of 2007 (54%). . . .

The growth in home broadband adoption occurred even though survey respondents reported paying more for broadband compared to May 2008. Last year, the average monthly bill for broadband internet service at home was $34.50, a figure that stands at $39.00 in April 2009.

The growth in broadband adoption indicates that the economic recession has had little effect on decisions about whether to buy or keep a home high-speed connection. The Pew Internet Project’s April 2009 survey found that people are twice as likely to say they have cut back or cancelled a cell phone plan or cable TV service than internet service.

Internet Had Over One Billion Users in December 2008

Posted in Digital Culture on January 26th, 2009

For the first time, the Internet had over one billion users who were 15 or older in December 2008.

Here's an excert from the press release:

The Asia-Pacific region accounted for the highest share of global Internet users at 41 percent, followed by Europe (28 percent share), North America (18 percent share), Latin-America (7 percent share), and the Middle East & Africa (5 percent share). . . .

China represented the largest online audience in the world in December 2008 with 180 million Internet users, representing nearly 18 percent of the total worldwide Internet audience, followed by the U.S. (16.2 percent share), Japan (6.0 percent share), Germany (3.7 percent share) and the U.K. (3.6 percent share).

New Pew Report: Future of the Internet III

Posted in Digital Culture, Emerging Technologies on December 14th, 2008

The Pew Internet & American Life Project has released Future of the Internet III.

Here’s an excerpt from the announcement:

Here are the key findings on the survey of experts by the Pew Internet & American Life Project that asked respondents to assess predictions about technology and its roles in the year 2020:

  • The mobile device will be the primary connection tool to the internet for most people in the world in 2020.
  • The transparency of people and organizations will increase, but that will not necessarily yield more personal integrity, social tolerance, or forgiveness.
  • Voice recognition and touch user-interfaces with the internet will be more prevalent and accepted by 2020.
  • Those working to enforce intellectual property law and copyright protection will remain in a continuing arms race, with the crackers who will find ways to copy and share content without payment.
  • The divisions between personal time and work time and between physical and virtual reality will be further erased for everyone who is connected, and the results will be mixed in their impact on basic social relations.
  • Next-generation engineering of the network to improve the current internet architecture is more likely than an effort to rebuild the architecture from scratch.

More Bits Than Stars in the Sky: Report on Global Information Growth

Posted in Digital Culture on March 11th, 2008

The International Data Corp has released The Diverse and Exploding Digital Universe: An Updated Forecast of Worldwide Information Growth through 2011.

According to the report: "But the number of digital 'atoms' in the digital universe is already bigger than the number of stars in the universe. And, because the digital universe is expanding by a factor of 10 every five years, in 15 years it will surpass Avogadro's number." (Avogadro's number is 602,200,000,000,000,000,000,000.)

Read more about it at "Study: Digital Universe and Its Impact Bigger Than We Thought" and "Web Users Warned about Online Exposure."

InterConnections: The IMLS National Study on the Use of Libraries, Museums and the Internet Published

Posted in Digital Culture, Libraries, Museums on March 7th, 2008

The Institute of Museum and Library Services has published InterConnections: The IMLS National Study on the Use of Libraries, Museums and the Internet. The full conclusions gives you the major findings.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

IMLS sponsored this national study through a cooperative agreement with a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill research team led by José-Marie Griffiths and Donald W. King, recognized leaders in information research. Their findings are based on five surveys of 1,000 to 1,600 adults each that were conducted during 2006. The study found that:

  • Libraries and museums are the most trusted sources of online information among adults of all ages, education levels, races, and ethnicities. Libraries and museums rank higher in trustworthiness than all other information sources including government, commercial, and private Web sites. The study shows that the public trust of museums and libraries migrates to the online environment.
  • The explosive growth of information available in the “Information Age” actually whets Americans’ appetite for more information. People search for information in many places and since the use of one source leads to others, museums, public libraries, and the Internet complement each other in this information-rich environment.
  • The Internet is not replacing in-person visits to libraries and museums and may actually increase onsite use of libraries and museums. There is a positive relationship between Internet use and in-person visits to museums and public libraries.

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