Archive for the 'Digital Curation & Digital Preservation' Category

"What Makes a Data Librarian? An Analysis of Job Descriptions and Specifications for Data Librarian "

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Research Libraries on November 14th, 2019

http://qqml-journal.net/index.php/qqml/article/view/541/522

"FAIR Data Reuse—The Path through Data Citation"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Metadata on November 13th, 2019

https://doi.org/10.1162/dint_a_00030

"Open Code Is Not Enough: Towards a Replicable Future for Geographic Data Science"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on November 12th, 2019

https://doi.org/10.31235/osf.io/3hbnt

"Proper Attribution for Curation and Maintenance of Research Collections: Metadata Recommendations of the RDA/TDWG Working Group"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Metadata on November 11th, 2019

http://doi.org/10.5334/dsj-2019-054

"How to (Easily) Extend the FAIRness of Existing Repositories"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Repositories on November 8th, 2019

http://www.data-intelligence-journal.org/p/44/

"FAIR Principles: Interpretations and Implementation Considerations"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on November 7th, 2019

Annika Jacobsen, et al. have published "FAIR Principles: Interpretations and Implementation Considerations" in Data Intelligence.

Here's an excerpt:

The FAIR principles have been widely cited, endorsed and adopted by a broad range of stakeholders since their publication in 2016. By intention, the 15 FAIR guiding principles do not dictate specific technological implementations, but provide guidance for improving Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability and Reusability of digital resources. This has likely contributed to the broad adoption of the FAIR principles, because individual stakeholder communities can implement their own FAIR solutions. However, it has also resulted in inconsistent interpretations that carry the risk of leading to incompatible implementations. Thus, while the FAIR principles are formulated on a high level and may be interpreted and implemented in different ways, for true interoperability we need to support convergence in implementation choices that are widely accessible and (re)-usable. We introduce the concept of FAIR implementation considerations to assist accelerated global participation and convergence towards accessible, robust, widespread and consistent FAIR implementations. Any self-identified stakeholder community may either choose to reuse solutions from existing implementations, or when they spot a gap, accept the challenge to create the needed solution, which, ideally, can be used again by other communities in the future. Here, we provide interpretations and implementation considerations (choices and challenges) for each FAIR principle.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 10 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Paywall Article: "Peculiarity of the Bit Rot and Link Rot Phenomena"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on November 6th, 2019

https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/GKMC-06-2019-0067/full/html

"Cracking the Copyright Dilemma in Software Preservation: Protecting Digital Culture through Fair Use Consensus"

Posted in Coding, Copyright, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on November 6th, 2019

Brandon Butler et al. have published "Cracking the Copyright Dilemma in Software Preservation: Protecting Digital Culture through Fair Use Consensus" in The Journal of Copyright in Education and Librarianship.

Here's an excerpt:

Copyright problems may inhibit the crucially important work of preserving legacy software. Such software is worthy of study in its own right because it is critical to accessing digital culture and expression. Preservation work is essential for communicating across boundaries of the past and present in a digital era. Software preservationists in the United States have addressed their copyright problems by developing a code of best practices in employing fair use. Their work is an example of how collective action by users of law changes the norms and beliefs about law, which can in turn change the law itself insofar as the law takes account of community norms and practices. The work of creating the code involved facilitators who are communication, information sciences, and legal scholars and practitioners. Thus, the creation of the code is also an example of crossing the boundaries between technology and policy research.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 10 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"The History and Future of Data Citation in Practice"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on November 6th, 2019

Mark A. Parsons et al. have published "The History and Future of Data Citation in Practice" in Data Science Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

In this review, we adopt the definition that 'Data citation is a reference to data for the purpose of credit attribution and facilitation of access to the data' (TGDCSP 2013: CIDCR6). Furthermore, access should be enabled for both humans and machines (DCSG 2014). We use this to discuss how data citation has evolved over the last couple of decades and to highlight issues that need more research and attention.

Data citation is not a new concept, but it has changed and evolved considerably since the beginning of the digital age. Basic practice is now established and slowly but increasingly being implemented. Nonetheless, critical issues remain. These issues are primarily because we try to address multiple human and computational concerns with a system originally designed in a non-digital world for more limited use cases. The community is beginning to challenge past assumptions, separate the multiple concerns (credit, access, reference, provenance, impact, etc.), and apply different approaches for different use cases.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 10 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Practice Meets Principle: Tracking Software and Data Citations to Zenodo DOIs"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on November 5th, 2019

Stephanie van de Sandt et al. have self-archived "Practice Meets Principle: Tracking Software and Data Citations to Zenodo DOIs."

Here's an excerpt:

Data and software citations are crucial for the transparency of research results and for the transmission of credit. But they are hard to track, because of the absence of a common citation standard. As a consequence, the FORCE11 recently proposed data and software citation principles as guidance for authors. Zenodo is recognized for the implementation of DOIs for software on a large scale. The minting of complementary DOIs for the version and concept allows measuring the impact of dynamic software. This article investigates characteristics of 5,456 citations to Zenodo data and software that were captured by the Asclepias Broker in January 2019. We analyzed the current state of data and software citation practices and the quality of software citation recommendations with regard to the impact of recent standardization efforts. Our findings prove that current citation practices and recommendations do not match proposed citation standards. We consequently suggest practical first steps towards the implementation of the software citation principles.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 10 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Different Preservation Levels: The Case of Scholarly Digital Editions"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Scholarly Books on November 5th, 2019

Elias Oltmanns et al. have published "Different Preservation Levels: The Case of Scholarly Digital Editions" in Data Science Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

Ensuring the long-term availability of research data forms an integral part of data management services. Where OAIS compliant digital preservation has been established in recent years, in almost all cases the services aim at the preservation of file-based objects. In the Digital Humanities, research data is often represented in highly structured aggregations, such as Scholarly Digital Editions. Naturally, scholars would like their editions to remain functionally complete as long as possible. Besides standard components like webservers, the presentation typically relies on project specific code interacting with client software like webbrowsers. Especially the latter being subject to rapid change over time invariably makes such environments awkward to maintain once funding has ended. Pragmatic approaches have to be found in order to balance the curation effort and the maintainability of access to research data over time.

A sketch of four potential service levels aiming at the long-term availability of research data in the humanities is outlined: (1) Continuous Maintenance, (2) Application Conservation, (3) Application Data Preservation, and (4) Bitstream Preservation. The first being too costly and the last hardly satisfactory in general, we suggest that the implementation of services by an infrastructure provider should concentrate on service levels 2 and 3. We explain their strengths and limitations considering the example of two Scholarly Digital Editions.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 10 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Paywall Article: "A Method for Creating Scanned Map Metadata for Geoportals, Library Catalogs, and Digital Repositories: Reworking Existing MARC Records of Paper Maps to Create New Records for their Scanned Counterparts"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on October 18th, 2019

https://doi.org/10.1080/15420353.2019.1640166

Paywall Article: "Strategies for Preserving Memes as Artefacts of Digital Culture"

Posted in Digital Culture, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on October 18th, 2019

https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0961000619882070

"Two Competing Visions for Research Data Sharing"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on October 15th, 2019

https://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2019/10/14/competing-visions-research-data/

"Cultural Obstacles to Research Data Management and Sharing at TU Delft"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Research Libraries on October 14th, 2019

Esther Plomp et al. have published "Cultural Obstacles to Research Data Management and Sharing at TU Delft" in Insights.

Here's an excerpt:

Research data management (RDM) is increasingly important in scholarship. Many researchers are, however, unaware of the benefits of good RDM and unsure about the practical steps they can take to improve their RDM practices. Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) addresses this cultural barrier by appointing Data Stewards at every faculty. By providing expert advice and increasing awareness, the Data Stewardship project focuses on incremental improvements in current data and software management and sharing practices. This cultural change is accelerated by the Data Champions who share best practices in data management with their peers. The Data Stewards and Data Champions build a community that allows a discipline-specific approach to RDM. Nevertheless, cultural change also requires appropriate rewards and incentives. While local initiatives are important, and we discuss several examples in this paper, systemic changes to the academic rewards system are needed. This will require collaborative efforts of a broad coalition of stakeholders and we will mention several such initiatives. This article demonstrates that community building is essential in changing the code and data management culture at TU Delft.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 10 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Engaging Researchers with Data Management: The Cookbook

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on October 14th, 2019

Connie Clare, et al. have published "Engaging Researchers with Data Management: The Cookbook".

Here's an excerpt:

Engaging Researchers with Data Management is an invaluable collection of 24 case studies, drawn from institutions across the globe, that demonstrate clearly and practically how to engage the research community with RDM. These case studies together illustrate the variety of innovative strategies research institutions have developed to engage with their researchers about managing research data.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 10 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Evaluating Fair Maturity Through a Scalable, Automated, Community-Governed Framework"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on October 11th, 2019

Mark D. Wilkinson et al. have published "Evaluating Fair Maturity Through a Scalable, Automated, Community-Governed Framework" in Scientific Data.

Here's an excerpt:

We propose a scalable, automatable framework to evaluate digital resources that encompasses measurable indicators, open source tools, and participation guidelines, which come together to accommodate domain relevant community-defined FAIR assessments. The components of the framework are: (1) Maturity Indicators—community-authored specifications that delimit a specific automatically-measurable FAIR behavior; (2) Compliance Tests—small Web apps that test digital resources against individual Maturity Indicators; and (3) the Evaluator, a Web application that registers, assembles, and applies community-relevant sets of Compliance Tests against a digital resource, and provides a detailed report about what a machine "sees" when it visits that resource. We discuss the technical and social considerations of FAIR assessments, and how this translates to our community-driven infrastructure. We then illustrate how the output of the Evaluator tool can serve as a roadmap to assist data stewards to incrementally and realistically improve the FAIRness of their resources.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 10 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Research Data Rights Management Guide

Posted in Copyright, Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Reports and White Papers on October 10th, 2019

The Australian Data Research Commons has released the "Research Data Rights Management Guide."

Here's an excerpt:

When taken together, data management, copyright and licensing issues relating to data can be complicated. Data is complicated and can take many forms. It can be a seemingly random compilation of numbers, or it could be a complex dataset containing recorded interviews or creative works. Combined data is often unable to be separated into component parts, unlike chapters in a book, so, unlike a book, it is difficult to separate different copyright conditions that might apply to certain sections of a dataset. Apart from legal ownership, other factors such as policy and business requirements, and relationships and norms can impact on data licensing decisions. For example, grant funding agreements may require a certain licence to be applied to research data outputs, or, in some cases, expectations or norms in a particular field of study will impact on licensing decisions.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 10 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"The Strategic Collaboration of Libraries in Digital Preservation"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Research Libraries on October 10th, 2019

Monika Zarnitz et al. have published "The Strategic Collaboration of Libraries in Digital Preservation" in LIBER Quarterly.

Here's an excerpt:

The German National Specialist Libraries cooperate closely in the field of digital preservation. One of the partners hosts the preservation system, while each library creates its own workflows and is free to ingest its digital material into this system. This paper delineates the factors for success of this collaboration. It describes the different aspects of collaboration in digital preservation and describes the benefits and costs of cooperation in this field as a case study.

Digital preservation is resource intensive and the required technology is complex. Therefore the libraries benefit from synergy effects: Reduced cost by sharing the preservation system, usage of similar workflows and formats of digital objects, work sharing in networking activities and staff training. The paper also stresses the advantages and difficulties while applying for certificates in a consortium. Their collaboration extends to intensive national and international networking activities, which yield more contacts than a single library could maintain if it acted on its own. The libraries' staffs are active in working groups of nestor—the German network for digital preservation—and in working groups of the Open Preservation Foundation.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 10 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Library Receives $1M Mellon Grant to Experiment with Digital Collections as Big Data "

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Grants, Text and Data Mining on October 8th, 2019

https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-19-098/?loclr=ealn

"From Persistent Identifiers to Digital Objects to Make Data Science More Efficient "

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on October 7th, 2019

Peter Wittenburg has published "From Persistent Identifiers to Digital Objects to Make Data Science More Efficient" in Data Intelligence.

Here's an excerpt:

In fact after 20 years of experience we can claim that there are trustworthy PID systems already in broad use. It is argued, however, that assigning PIDs is just the first step. If we agree to assign PIDs and also use the PID to store important relationships such as pointing to locations where the bit sequences or different metadata can be accessed, we are close to defining Digital Objects (DO) which could indeed indicate a solution to solve some of the basic problems in data management and processing. In addition to standardizing the way we assign PIDs, metadata and other state information we could also define a Digital Object Access Protocol as a universal exchange protocol for DOs stored in repositories using different data models and data organizations. We could also associate a type with each DO and a set of operations allowed working on its content which would facilitate the way to automatic processing which has been identified as the major step for scalability in data science and data industry. A globally connected group of experts is now working on establishing testbeds for a DO-based data infrastructure.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 10 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"The Research Data Sharing Business Landscape"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on October 4th, 2019

https://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2019/10/02/research-data-sharing-business-landscape/

Paywall Article: "A Framework for Web Archiving and Guaranteed Retrieval"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on October 2nd, 2019

https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-9364-8_16

"The Formation of Research Ethics for Data Sharing by Biological Scientists: An Empirical Analysis"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on September 26th, 2019

https://doi.org/10.1108/AJIM-12-2018-0296

"How to Use Software Heritage for Archiving and Referencing Your Source Code: Guidelines and Walkthrough"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Repositories on September 26th, 2019

Roberto Di Cosmo has self-archived "How to Use Software Heritage for Archiving and Referencing Your Source Code: Guidelines and Walkthrough."

Here's an excerpt:

Software source code is an essential research output, and many research communities strongly encourage making the source code of the artefact available by archiving it in publicly-accessible long-term archives. Software Heritage is a non profit, long term universal archive specifically designed for software source code, and able to store not only a software artifact, but also its full development history. It provides the ideal place to preserve research software artifacts, and offers powerful mechanisms to enhance research articles with precise references to relevant fragments of your source code. Using Software Heritage for your research software artifacts is straightforward and involves three simple steps. This document details each of these three steps, providing guidelines for making the most out of Software Heritage for your research.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 10 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap


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