Archive for the 'Digital Curation & Digital Preservation' Category

Blog Reports about the National Digital Information Infrastructure Preservation Program Partners Meeting

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on June 29th, 2009

Several blog reports are available about the recent National Digital Information Infrastructure Preservation Program partners meeting.

Library of Congress Releases Bagit: Transferring Content for Digital Preservation Video

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on June 29th, 2009

The Library of Congress has released a digital video, Bagit: Transferring Content for Digital Preservation.

Here's the description:

The Library of Congress's steadily growing digital collections arrive primarily over the network rather than on hardware media. But that data transfer can be difficult because different organizations have different policies and technologies.

The Library—with the California Digital Library and Stanford University – has developed guidelines for creating and moving standardized digital containers, called "bags." A bag functions like a physical envelope that is used to send content through the mail but with bags, a user sends content from one computer to another.

Bags have a sparse, uncomplicated structure that transcends differences in institutional data, data architecture, formats and practices. A bag's minimal but essential metadata is machine readable, which makes it easy to automate ingest of the data. Bags can be sent over computer networks or physically moved using portable storage devices.

Bags have built-in inventory checking, to help ensure that content transferred intact. Bags are flexible and can work in many different settings, including situations where the content is located in more than one place. This video describes the preparation and transfer of data over the network in bags.

CoOL Moves to American Institute for Conservation

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on June 23rd, 2009

Conservation OnLine (CoOL) and the Conservation DistList are moving from the Stanford University Libraries to the American Institute for Conservation.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

The American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC) announced that they will now host Conservation OnLine (CoOL) after 22 years of its being hosted by Stanford University Libraries. CoOL is a web-based library of conservation information, covering a wide spectrum of topics of interest to those involved with the conservation of library, archives, and museum materials. It contains approximately 120,000 documents, including an online archive of the Journal of the American Institute for Conservation. It also includes the Conservation DistList, with 9,969 subscribers from at least 91 countries. CoOL serves as both an important resource for information and as a forum for conservation professionals all over the world.

AIC’s first priority is to make the DistList operational as soon as possible. Further announcements will be made as to the resumption of activity on the DistList and where other CoOL resources will be located in the future. We are continuing discussions with allied and affiliate organizations in order to make CoOL’s transition as seamless as possible.

Texas Conference on Digital Libraries 2009 Presentations

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Repositories, DSpace, Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs), Institutional Repositories on June 21st, 2009

Presentations from the Texas Conference on Digital Libraries 2009 are now available.

Here's those by Texas Digital Library staff:

American Institute of Physics Will Use CLOCKSS Digital Archive

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Publishing on June 16th, 2009

The American Institute of Physics will use the CLOCKSS (Controlled Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe) "dark" digital archive.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

CLOCKSS will make AIP content freely available in the event that AIP is no longer able to provide access. . . .

The CLOCKSS initiative was created in response to the growing concern that digital content purchased by libraries may not always be available due to discontinuation of an electronic journal or because of a catastrophic event. CLOCKSS creates a secure, multi-site archive of web-published content that can be tapped into to provide ongoing access to researchers worldwide, free of charge.

"Today, when over one half of all our subscriptions are online only, we owe it to our customers more than ever to provide the best security possible for their electronic products," said Mark Cassar, AIP's Acting Publisher. "Our nearly three-year-old partnership with Portico, and now our participation in the CLOCKSS initiative, solidifies this commitment."

CLOCKSS' decentralized, geographically distributed preservation strategy ensures that the digital assets of the global research community will survive intact. Additionally, it satisfies the demand for locally situated archives with 15 archive nodes planned worldwide by 2010.

Stanford Ends Support for Conservation OnLine (CoOL)

Posted in ARL Libraries, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on June 15th, 2009

Catherine Tierney, Associate University Librarian for Technical Services at the Stanford University Libraries, has announced in a padg mailing list message that, due to budget constraints, the Libraries will no longer be able to support Conservation OnLine (CoOL). The Libraries had supported CoOL for 22 years.

Curating Atmospheric Data for Long Term Use: Infrastructure and Preservation Issues for the Atmospheric Sciences Community

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on June 11th, 2009

The Digital Curation Centre has released Curating Atmospheric Data for Long Term Use: Infrastructure and Preservation Issues for the Atmospheric Sciences Community, SCARP Case Study No. 2.

Here's an excerpt:

DCC SCARP aims to understand disciplinary approaches to data curation by substantial case studies based on an immersive approach. As part of the SCARP project we engaged with a number of archives, including the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the World Data Centre Archive at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association (EISCAT). We developed a preservation analysis methodology which is discipline independent in application but none the less capable of identifying and drawing out discipline specific preservation requirements and issues. In this case study report we present the methodology along with its application to the Mesospheric Stratospheric Tropospheric (MST) radar dataset, which is currently supported by and accessed through the British Atmospheric Data Centre. We suggest strategies for the long term preservation of the MST data and make recommendations for the wider community.

Foundation Grants for Preservation in Libraries, Archives, and Museums, 2009 Edition

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Grants on June 11th, 2009

The Library of Congress and the Foundation Center have released Foundation Grants for Preservation in Libraries, Archives, and Museums, 2009 Edition.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

This publication lists 1,944 grants of $5,000 or more awarded by 488 foundations, from 2004 through the publication date of this guide. It covers grants to public, academic, research, school, and special libraries, and to archives and museums for activities related to conservation and preservation. This publication includes:

  • an introduction that explains the book's coverage, arrangement, entries, and how to research using the volume. Note: This PDF file contains hotlinks to free online tutorials that cover grant writing and provide an insight into the world of U.S. foundation giving offered by the Foundation Center, as well as to some other widely used non-profit guidance on preservation grants found on the Conservation Online web site.
  • a statistical analysis of grant funding in the area of preservation by foundation, recipient location, subject, recipient type (e.g., Library), grant size, and foundation generosity nationwide.
  • state-by-state descriptions of projects funded in preservation nationwide including the foundation's name, limitations on giving, recipient(s), size of grants, and purpose of the grant described. Note: This section is hot linked in the PDF version directly to more detailed descriptions of the foundations.
  • indexes by recipient, geographic area of the recipient, and subject. Note: If you do not find what you are looking for in the indices, use the find feature to search the text for your term.
  • a list of all foundations that have donated to preservation and conservation with their contact information and limitations on giving.

DPC What’s New in Digital Preservation, No. 20

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on June 10th, 2009

DPC What's New in Digital Preservation number 20 has been published.

Here’s a description of the publication:

This is a summary of selected recent activity in the field of digital preservation compiled from a number of resources including the digital-preservation and padiforum-l mailing lists. Additional or related items of interest may also be included.

JHOVE 1.3 Released

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Repositories on June 8th, 2009

JHOVE 1.3 has been released. JHOVE (JSTOR/Harvard Object Validation Environment) "provides functions to perform format-specific identification, validation, and characterization of digital objects."

Read more about it at "JHOVE 1.3 Is Out."

Keeping Research Data Safe 2: The Identification of Long-lived Digital Datasets for the Purposes of Cost Analysis: Project Plan

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on May 25th, 2009

Charles Beagrie has released Keeping Research Data Safe 2: The Identification of Long-lived Digital Datasets for the Purposes of Cost Analysis: Project Plan.

Here's an excerpt from the project home page:

The Keeping Research Data Safe 2 project commenced on 31 March 2009 and will complete in December 2009. The project will identify and analyse sources of long-lived data and develop longitudinal data on associated preservation costs and benefits. We believe these outcomes will be critical to developing preservation costing tools and cost benefit analyses for justifying and sustaining major investments in repositories and data curation.

Durable Digital Media: How Does a Billion Years Sound?

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Emerging Technologies on May 25th, 2009

A recent article in Nano Letters describes an experimental nanotechnology-based storage device that could last for a billion years and store up to one terabyte per square inch.

Read more about it at "New Memory Material May Hold Data For One Billion Years."

Digital Preservation: PARSE.Insight Project Reports on First Year Achievements

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on May 24th, 2009

In "Annual Review Year 1: Goals and Achievements," The PARSE.Insight (Permanent Access to the Records of Science in Europe) Project reports on its first year achievements. This post includes links to a number of longer documents, including the PARSE.Insight Deliverable D2.1 Draft Roadmap.

Here's an excerpt from the PARSE.Insight Deliverable D2.1 Draft Roadmap.

The purpose of this document is to provide an overview and initial details of a number of specific components, both technical and non-technical, which would be needed to supplement existing and already planned infrastructures for science data. The infrastructure components presented here are aimed at bridging the gaps between islands of functionality, developed for particular purposes, often by other European projects, whether separated by discipline or time. Thus the infrastructure components are intended to play a general, unifying role in science data. While developed in the context of a European wide infrastructure, there would be great advantages for these types of infrastructure components to be available much more widely.

Library Trends Thematic Issue on the Library of Congress National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on May 20th, 2009

The latest issue of Library Trends has a series of articles on the Library of Congress National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program.

Safeguarding Collections at the Dawn of the 21st Century: Describing Roles & Measuring Contemporary Preservation Activities in ARL Libraries

Posted in ARL Libraries, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on May 14th, 2009

The Association of Research Libraries has released Safeguarding Collections at the Dawn of the 21st Century: Describing Roles & Measuring Contemporary Preservation Activities in ARL Libraries.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

The report is organized into three thematic sections:

  1. Reshaping the preservation functions in research libraries—Libraries must reconceptualize preservation as a core function that extends beyond activities within a preservation department. As preservation is advanced through a range of investments and partnerships, libraries are in the midst of reshaping priorities and reallocating resources to align with new services and conceptions of collections.

  2. The networked digital environment—ARL members need to expand their activities and deepen their practices related to preserving digital content though Web archiving, deployment of digital repositories, and efforts to preserve e-journals and other born digital content (whether purchased, licensed, or digitized by the library).

  3. Library collaborative strategies—Community-level activities are crucial, both to address the challenges presented by digital formats, but also to make traditional preservation activities more effective.

Approaches to Managing and Collecting Born-Digital Literary Materials for Scholarly Use

Posted in Digital Archives and Special Collections, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Humanities on May 13th, 2009

The Office of Digital Humanities in the National Endowment for the Humanities has released the final version of Approaches to Managing and Collecting Born-Digital Literary Materials for Scholarly Use.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

This project is about developing archival tools and best practices for preserving born-digital documents produced by contemporary authors. Traditionally, humanists have found great scholarly value in studying the papers, correspondence, and first drafts of authors, politicians, and other historical figures. In this white paper, the project director make note that contemporary figures compose almost all of their materials on a computer. What challenges will this present to humanists, archivists, and librarians in the future? This very readable paper explores many of these issues with specific case studies involving a number of leading libraries and archives.

DigitalPreservationEurope Releases Digital Preservation and Nuclear Disaster: An Animation on YouTube

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on May 5th, 2009

DigitalPreservationEurope has released Digital Preservation and Nuclear Disaster: An Animation on YouTube.

DigitalKoans

Reference Model for an Open Archival Information System (OAIS) Draft for Review

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Standards on May 5th, 2009

A near-final draft of the Reference Model for an Open Archival Information System (OAIS) has been made available for error-checking review.

Here's an excerpt:

This document is a technical Recommendation for use in developing a broader consensus on what is required for an archive to provide permanent, or indefinite long-term, preservation of digital information.

This Recommendation establishes a common framework of terms and concepts which comprise an Open Archival Information System (OAIS). It allows existing and future archives to be more meaningfully compared and contrasted. It provides a basis for further standardization within an archival context and it should promote greater vendor awareness of, and support of, archival requirements.

DigitalKoans

JISC Project: Lifespan Initiative for the Research and Data Archive Repository

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Repositories, Digitization on May 5th, 2009

JISC's Lifespan Initiative for the Research and Data Archive Repository project started on 4/1/09.

Here's an excerpt from the project Web page:

The Lifespan Collection (www.lifespancollection.org.uk) represents an existing and unique research data set, which includes around 3,400 hours of audio-taped interviews, scorings and quantitative computerised data, capturing the lifetime experience of over 500 individuals. The outcomes of this project will be presented in terms of both a report on the processes and best-practice solutions for preserving and digitalising the data, including the creation of processes of submission of, and accessibility to, current and future critical datasets that ensure compliance with data security, copyright legislation, licensing, and associated audit functions. One or more detailed case studies will be produced that will not only inform the future development of this project but will act as illustrative examples for use by other similar start-up projects. This will lay the ground work for an exemplar implementation of the tools and solutions already delivered by JISC and other institutions.

DigitalKoans

Presentations from SCARP Workshop: Building and Curating Online Video Corpora

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Media, Digital Repositories on April 28th, 2009

Presentations from the SCARP Workshop: Building and Curating Online Video Corpora are now available.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

This was a meeting of researchers and stakeholders in data service provision to discuss curation issues raised in our SCARP case study on the roles and re-usability of video data in social studies of interaction. This event aimed to raise mutual awareness of research communities' practices and needs for archiving, sharing and re-using digital video data; and identify how local and national research data services may contribute to the infrastructure for video data curation.

Infrastructure Planning and Data Curation: A Comparative Study of International Approaches to Enabling the Sharing of Research Data

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on April 26th, 2009

JISC has released Infrastructure Planning and Data Curation: A Comparative Study of International Approaches to Enabling the Sharing of Research Data.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The current methods of storing research data are as diverse as the disciplines that generate them and are necessarily driven by the myriad ways in which researchers need to subsequently access and exploit the information they contain. Institutional repositories, data centres and all other methods of storing data have to exist within an infrastructure that enables researchers to access ad exploit the data, and variant models for this infrastructure can be conceptualised. Discussion of effective infrastructures for curating data is taking place a all levels, wherever research is reliant on the longterm stewardship of digital material. JISC has commissioned this study to survey the different national agendas that are addressing variant infrastructure models, to inform developments within the UK and for facilitating an internationally integrated approach to data curation.

The study of data sharing initiatives in the OECD countries confirmed the traditional perception that the policy instruments are clustered more in the upper end of the stakeholder taxonomy – i.e. at the level of national and research funding organisations whereas the services and practical tools are being developed by organisations at the lower end of the taxonomy. Despite the differences that exist between countries in terms of the models used for research funding, as well as the levels at which decisions are taken, there is agreement on the expected strata of responsibility for applying the instruments of data sharing. This supports the structure of stakeholder taxonomy used in the study.

The Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine Rebooted

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on April 26th, 2009

The Internet Archive's Wayback Machine is now running on a Sun Modular Datacenter.

Here's an excerpt from the "Wayback Machine Comes to Life in New Home":

The Wayback Machine is a 150 billion page web archive with a front end to serve it through the archive.org website.

Today the new machine came to life, so if you using the service, you are using a 20' by 8' by 8' "machine" that sits in Santa Clara, courtesy of Sun Microcomputer. It serves about 500 queries per second from the approximately 4.5 Petabytes (4.5 million gigabytes) of archived web data. We think of the cluster of computers and the Modular Datacenter as a single machine because it acts like one and looks like one. If that is true, then it might be one of the largest current computers.

Read more about Sun and the Internet Archive at "The Internet in a Box."

Historians’ Work Disrupted When Paper of Record Digital Archive Vanishes after Google Purchase

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Humanities, Google and Other Search Engines on April 22nd, 2009

After Google purchased the Paper of Record digital archive, it brought the site down, upsetting historians that relied on the collection of older newspapers. Although the site will be temporarily restored with Google's permission, the incident raises issues about the permanence and reliability of scholarly digital archives.

Read more about it at "Digital Archives That Disappear" and "'Paper of Record' Disappears, Leaving Historians in the Lurch."

Talis Interview with Peter Brantley, Director of the Internet Archive

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Libraries on April 19th, 2009

Richard Wallis has posted a digital audio interview with Peter Brantley, the Internet Archive's new Director, on Panlibus.

Here's an excerpt from the post:

In this conversation we look back over the last couple of years at the DLF [Digital Library Federation] and then forward in to his new challenge and opportunity at the Internet Archive.

We go on to discuss his thoughts and plans to make it easy to identify books and information and their locations in a way that is currently not possible with the processes and protocols we use today.

David S. H. Rosenthal on “How Are We ‘Ensuring the Longevity of Digital Documents’?”

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on April 16th, 2009

David S. H. Rosenthal's CNI plenary presentation on "How Are We “Ensuring the Longevity of Digital Documents'?" is now available (see also "Spring CNI Plenary: The Remix").


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