Archive for the 'Digital Humanities' Category

Hacking the Academy: New Approaches to Scholarship and Teaching from Digital Humanities

Posted in Digital Humanities, Scholarly Communication on June 17th, 2013

digitalculturebooks has released Hacking the Academy: New Approaches to Scholarship and Teaching from Digital Humanities, edited by Daniel J. Cohen and Tom Scheinfeldt.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Hacking the Academy both explores and contributes to ongoing efforts to rebuild scholarly infrastructure for a new millennium. This book poses important and timely questions about scholarship in the digital age.

  • Can an algorithm edit a journal?
  • Can a library exist without books?
  • Can students build and manage their own learning management platforms?
  • Can a conference be held without a program?
  • Can Twitter replace a scholarly society?

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

"Brief of Digital Humanities and Law Scholars as Amici Curiae in Authors Guild v. Hathitrust"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Digital Humanities, Publishing on June 12th, 2013

Matthew Jockers, Matthew Sag, and Jason Schultz have self-archived "Brief of Digital Humanities and Law Scholars as Amici Curiae in Authors Guild v. Hathitrust" in SSRN.

Here's an excerpt:

This Amicus Brief was filed in the United States Court of Appeal for the Second Circuit in the case of Authors Guild v. Hathitrust on June 4, 2013. The case is on Appeal from the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, No. 11 CV 6351 (Baer, J.)

Amici are over 100 professors and scholars who teach, write, and research in computer science, the digital humanities, linguistics or law, and two associations that represent Digital Humanities scholars generally. . . .

The Court's ruling in this case on the legality of mass digitization could dramatically affect the future of work in the Digital Humanities. The Amici argue that the Court should affirm the decision of the district court below that library digitization for the purpose of text mining and similar non-expressive uses present no legally cognizable conflict with the statutory rights or interests of the copyright holders.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

Perception Analysis of Scholarly E-Books in the Humanities at the Collegiate Level

Posted in Digital Humanities, E-Books, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on April 15th, 2013

ACLS Humanities E-Book has released Perception Analysis of Scholarly E-Books in the Humanities at the Collegiate Level.

Here's an excerpt:

At present, there is significant market confusion regarding e-book selections in the academic marketplace, particularly in the humanities. University acquisition librarians, unsure of what the offerings actually are, have found themselves unsure of where to allocate funds, which has resulted in the postponement of e-book purchases. This paper provides a current assessment of the status of e-book offerings in the humanities.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

"Keeping Up With…Digital Humanities"

Posted in Digital Humanities on April 12th, 2013

ACRL has released "Keeping Up With…Digital Humanities"

Here's an excerpt:

Digital Humanities is not limited to any one field—it is highly collaborative, and draws contributors from many backgrounds—but it does have a solid base in academia. In recent years, related initiatives have emerged at universities (and elsewhere) worldwide. For academic librarians, the increasing prominence of Digital Humanities, its ongoing debates and the issues and opportunities associated with bringing it into the library, are worth noting. In this issue of Keeping Up With… we address some of the most significant "need-to-know" issues for academic librarians interested in Digital Humanities.

| Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap |

2013 Digging into Data Challenge Grants

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Humanities, Grants on February 6th, 2013

JISC has announced the 2013 Digging into Data Challenge grant program.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Today, the third round of the Digging into Data Challenge, a grant competition designed to help develop digital research in the humanities and social sciences launches in Canada, the Netherlands, the UK and the United States. . . .

During the first two rounds of the Challenge, held in 2009 and 2011, nearly 150 teams, representing universities from across Canada, the Netherlands, the US, and the UK, competed to demonstrate how innovative research methods could be used to address questions in the humanities and social sciences. Twenty-two of those teams were awarded grants during those earlier rounds, each of them demonstrating new methods for analysing vast digital resources used for humanities and social science research, like digital books, survey data, economic data, newspapers, music, and other scholarly, scientific, and cultural heritage resources that are now being digitised on a huge scale.

Due to the overwhelming popularity of the earlier rounds, two additional funders have joined for round three, enabling this competition to have a world-wide reach into many different scholarly and scientific domains.

| Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 2 (XHTML website; over 200 entries) | Digital Scholarship |

Digital Humanities Pedagogy: Practices, Principles and Politics

Posted in Digital Humanities on January 15th, 2013

Open Book Publishers has released Digital Humanities Pedagogy: Practices, Principles and Politics.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The first section offers views on the practical realities of teaching digital humanities at undergraduate and graduate levels, presenting case studies and snapshots of the authors' experiences alongside models for future courses and reflections on pedagogical successes and failures. The next section proposes strategies for teaching foundational digital humanities methods across a variety of scholarly disciplines, and the book concludes with wider debates about the place of digital humanities in the academy, from the field's cultural assumptions and social obligations to its political visions.

| Digital Scholarship Overview | Digital Scholarship |

Supporting the Changing Research Practices of Historians

Posted in Digital Humanities, Electronic Resources, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Communication on December 11th, 2012

Ithaka S+R has released Supporting the Changing Research Practices of Historians .

Here's an excerpt:

In History, the Ithaka S+R project team found a discipline in transition. An expansion in the nature of the field over the past 50 years has introduced new sources, both in terms of subject coverage and international scope. However, only a comparatively small share of the primary sources required by historians has been made available digitally, tempering the opportunity for new methods to take hold.

Even if the impact of computational analysis and other types of new research methods remains limited to a subset of historians, new research practices and communications mechanisms are being adopted widely, bringing with them both opportunities and challenges.

| Digital Scholarship's 2012 Publications | Digital Scholarship |

Measuring the Impact of Digital Resources: The Balanced Value Impact Model

Posted in Digital Humanities, Digital Libraries, Electronic Resources, Reports and White Papers on October 31st, 2012

King's College London has released Measuring the Impact of Digital Resources: The Balanced Value Impact Model.

Here's an excerpt:

This document synthesizes information from the whole Impact Assessment sector and then proposes the Balanced Value Impact Model as a means to effectively carry out an Impact Assessment relating to the benefits of digitization and digital resources in general. It seeks to help the communities identified above to provide a compelling argument for future work. Thus, you will find in this document information on:

  • Where the value and impact can be found in digital resources,
  • Who are the beneficiaries gaining from the impact and value,
  • How to measure change and impact for digital resources,
  • What makes for good indicators of change in people’s lives,
  • How to do an Impact Assessment using the Balanced Value Impact Model, and
  • How to present a convincing evidence-based argument for digital resources?

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

"Brief of Digital Humanities and Law Scholars as Amici Curiae in Authors Guild v. Google"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Digital Humanities, E-Books, Google and Other Search Engines, Mass Digitizaton, Publishing on October 21st, 2012

Matthew L. Jockers, Matthew Sag, and Jason Schultz have self-archived "Brief of Digital Humanities and Law Scholars as Amici Curiae in Authors Guild v. Google" in SSRN.

Here's an excerpt:

The brief argues that, just as copyright law has long recognized the distinction between protection for an author's original expression (e.g., the narrative prose describing the plot) and the public's right to access the facts and ideas contained within that expression (e.g., a list of characters or the places they visit), the law must also recognize the distinction between copying books for expressive purposes (e.g., reading) and nonexpressive purposes, such as extracting metadata and conducting macroanalyses. We amici urge the court to follow established precedent with respect to Internet search engines, software reverse engineering, and plagiarism detection software and to hold that the digitization of books for text-mining purposes is a form of incidental or intermediate copying to be regarded as fair use as long as the end product is also nonexpressive or otherwise non-infringing.

| Google Books Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

"Digital Humanities: Where to Start"

Posted in Digital Humanities on October 2nd, 2012

Jennifer L. Adams and Kevin B. Gunn have published "Digital Humanities: Where to Start" in the latest issue of College & Research Libraries News.

Here's an excerpt:

As an emerging field, DH has, thus far, had a broad characterization. As technology and our understanding of it change, so do the limits of DH. There has been some debate as to whether DH constitutes a discipline of its own or is simply an application of new technologies to existing disciplines. In either case, DH can be understood as the place where traditional humanities research methodologies and media/digital technologies intersect. DH is more than the digitization of existing processes, documents, and artifacts. It is often data-driven, answering humanities research problems with multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and cross-disciplinary approaches within the digital/IT realm. The current challenge for DH lies in establishing itself in traditional academic environments. . . .

There are many useful resources available online, including general sites as well as e-publications, tools, tutorials, and organizations. We have tried to include a representative sample of those we feel are most important or could be most useful for librarians getting started in the digital humanities.

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

"Developing Humanities Collections in the Digital Age: Exploring Humanities Faculty Engagement with Electronic and Print Resources"

Posted in Digital Humanities, Electronic Resources on September 12th, 2012

College & Research Libraries has released an eprint of "Developing Humanities Collections in the Digital Age: Exploring Humanities Faculty Engagement with Electronic and Print Resources."

Here's an excerpt:

This article is based on quantitative and qualitative research examining humanities scholars' understandings of the advantages and disadvantages of print versus electronic information resources. It explores how humanities' faculty members at [removed for review] use print and electronic resources, as well as how they perceive these different formats. It was carried out with the goal of assisting the authors and other librarians in choosing between electronic and print formats when performing collection development responsibilities.

| Reviews of Digital Scholarship Publications | Digital Scholarship |

Pratt Institute School of Information and Library Science Offers Digital Humanities Concentration in M.S. Degree

Posted in Digital Humanities, Information Schools on August 22nd, 2012

The Pratt Institute School of Information and Library Science is offering a Digital Humanities program concentration in its M.S. in Library and Information Science degree.

Here's an excerpt from the program description:

The concentration addresses the range of issues involved in digital humanities, from digitizing primary sources and creating content systems to analyzing data and exploring new platforms for research and publication.

By the end of the concentration, students are able bring skills in digitization, preservation, metadata, analysis, and technology into academic settings to support faculty and institutional teaching and research. They are also prepared to serve as thought leaders at cultural heritage institutions in the area of digital scholarship and public programming.

| Reviews of Digital Scholarship Publications | Digital Scholarship |

Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Posted in Digital Humanities, Grants on August 16th, 2012

The National Endowment for the Humanities is accepting applications for Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants. The application deadline is September 25, 2012 for projects that begin in May 2013.

Here's an excerpt announcement:

Proposals should be for the planning or initial stages of digital initiatives in any area of the humanities. Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants may involve

  • research that brings new approaches or documents best practices in the study of the digital humanities;
  • planning and developing prototypes of new digital tools for preserving, analyzing, and making accessible digital resources, including libraries' and museums' digital assets;
  • scholarship that focuses on the history, criticism, and philosophy of digital culture and its impact on society;
  • scholarship or studies that examine the philosophical or practical implications and impact of the use of emerging technologies in specific fields or disciplines of the humanities, or in interdisciplinary collaborations involving several fields or disciplines;
  • innovative uses of technology for public programming and education utilizing both traditional and new media; and
  • new digital modes of publication that facilitate the dissemination of humanities scholarship in advanced academic as well as informal or formal educational settings at all academic levels.

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog | Digital Scholarship |

One Culture. Computationally Intensive Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences: A Report on the Experiences of First Respondents to the Digging Into Data Challenge

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Humanities, Reports and White Papers on June 12th, 2012

The Council on Library and Information Resources. has released One Culture. Computationally Intensive Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences: A Report on the Experiences of First Respondents to the Digging Into Data Challenge.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement, which includes links to additional case studies:

This report culminates two years of work by CLIR staff involving extensive interviews and site visits with scholars engaged in international research collaborations involving computational analysis of large data corpora. These scholars were the first recipients of grants through the Digging into Data program, led by the NEH, who partnered with JISC in the UK, SSHRC in Canada, and the NSF to fund the first eight initiatives. The report introduces the eight projects and discusses the importance of these cases as models for the future of research in the academy.

| Digital Curation Bibliography: Preservation and Stewardship of Scholarly Works | Digital Scholarship |

Modern Language Association Releases "Guidelines for Evaluating Work in Digital Humanities and Digital Media"

Posted in Digital Humanities, Scholarly Communication on April 26th, 2012

The Modern Language Association has released "Guidelines for Evaluating Work in Digital Humanities and Digital Media." This is the first update in 12 years.

Here's an excerpt:

The following guidelines are designed to help departments and faculty members implement effective evaluation procedures for hiring, reappointment, tenure, and promotion. They apply to scholars working with digital media as their subject matter and to those who use digital methods or whose work takes digital form.

| Digital Scholarship's Digital/Print Books | Digital Scholarship |

ACRL Establishes Digital Humanities Discussion Group

Posted in ALA, Digital Humanities on April 17th, 2012

The Association of College & Research Libraries has established a Digital Humanities Discussion Group.

Read more about it at "New ACRL Discussion Groups."

| Reviews of Digital Scholarship Publications | Digital Scholarship |

NEH Humanities Collections and Reference Resources Grants

Posted in Digital Archives and Special Collections, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Humanities, Digitization, Grants on April 16th, 2012

The National Endowment for the Humanities is accepting grant proposals for its Humanities Collections and Reference Resources program.

Here's an excerpt from the program guidelines:

Applications may be submitted for projects that address one or more of the following activities:

  • arranging and describing archival and manuscript collections;
  • cataloging collections of printed works, photographs, recorded sound, moving images, art, and material culture;
  • providing conservation treatment (including deacidification) for collections, leading to enhanced access;
  • digitizing collections;
  • preserving and improving access to born-digital sources;
  • developing databases, virtual collections, or other electronic resources to codify information on a subject or to provide integrated access to selected humanities materials; . . . .
  • developing tools for spatial analysis and representation of humanities data, such as atlases and geographic information systems (GIS); and
  • designing digital tools to facilitate use of humanities resources.

| Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

Journal of Digital Humanities Launched

Posted in Digital Humanities, E-Journals, Scholarly Journals on April 5th, 2012

The first issue of the Journal of Digital Humanities has been published by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media.

Here's an excerpt from the "A Community-Sourced Journal":

We're pleased to present the inaugural issue of the Journal of Digital Humanities, which represents the best of the work that was posted online by the community of digital humanities scholars and practitioners in the final three months of 2011. . . .

The works in this issue were first highlighted on the Digital Humanities Now site and its related feeds. . . .

Once highlighted as an "Editors' Choice" on Digital Humanities Now, works were eligible for inclusion in the Journal of Digital Humanities. By looking at a range of qualitative and quantitative measures of quality, from the kinds of responses a work engendered, to the breadth of the community who felt it was worth their time to examine a work, to close reading and analyses of merit by the editorial board and others, we were able to produce the final list of works. For the inaugural issue, more than 15,000 items published or shared by the digital humanities community last quarter were reviewed for Digital Humanities Now. Of these, 85 were selected as Editors' Choices, and from these 85 the ones that most influenced the community, as measured by interest, transmission, and response, have been selected for formal publication in the Journal. The digital humanities community participated further in the review process through open peer review of the pieces selected for the Journal. Authors selected for inclusion were given time to revise their work to answer criticisms and suggestions from the community and editors, prior to a round of careful editing to avoid typographical errors and other minor mistakes.

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010: "SEP [Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography] is compiled with utter professionalism. It reminds me of the work of the best artisans who know not only every item that leaves their workshops, but each component used to create them—providing the ideal quality control." — Péter Jacsó ONLINE 27, no. 3 (2003): 73-76. | Digital Scholarship |

NEH Announces New Digital Humanities Start-Up Grant Recipients

Posted in Digital Humanities, Grants on March 21st, 2012

The National Endowment for the Humanities's Office of Digital Humanities has announced the recipients of 22 new Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants.

The announcement was part of a larger announcement of $17 million in grants for 208 humanities projects. A state-by-state list of these grants is available.

| Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

"Enhancing Scholarly Publications: Developing Hybrid Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences"

Posted in Digital Humanities, E-Books, Publishing, Scholarly Books on March 18th, 2012

Nicholas W. Jankowski, Andrea Scharnhorst, Clifford Tatum, and Zuotian Tatum have self-archived "Enhancing Scholarly Publications: Developing Hybrid Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences" in SSRN.

Here's an excerpt:

Enhancing publications has a long history but is gaining acceleration as authors and publishers explore electronic tablets as devices for dissemination and presentation. Enhancement of scholarly publications, in contrast, more often takes place in a Web environment and is coupled with presentation of supplementary materials related to research. The approach to enhancing scholarly publications presented in this article goes a step further and involves the interlinking of the "objects" of a document: datasets, supplementary materials, secondary analyses, and post-publication interventions. This approach connects the user-centricity of Web 2.0 with the Semantic Web. It aims at facilitating long-term content structure through standardized formats intended to improve interoperability between concepts and terms within and across knowledge domains. We explored this conception of enhancement on a small set of books prepared for traditional academic publishers. While the project was primarily an exercise in development, the conclusion section of the article reflects on areas where conceptual and empirical studies could be initiated to complement this new direction in scholarly publishing.

For related information, see the SURF Enhancing Scholarly Publishing in the Humanities and Social Sciences project website.

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, Version 80 | Digital Scholarship |

Google Digital Humanities Awards Recipient Interviews Report

Posted in Digital Humanities, Reports and White Papers on February 20th, 2012

Virgil E.Varvel, Jr. and Andrea Thomer have self-archived the Google Digital Humanities Awards Recipient Interviews Report in IDEALS.

Here's an excerpt:

As input into the development, design, and improvement of the HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC), recipients of Google's Digital Humanities Grants were interviewed to identify issues encountered during their projects. This project was guided by the following goals:

  • Increase empirical understanding of how to identify materials for use by scholars.
  • Increase empirical understanding of how to provide better access to materials for use by scholars.
  • Identify meaningful characteristics of content that affect identification, retrieval, and other parameters.
  • Identify data preprocessing and transformation issues encountered by scholars.
  • Provide input to inform the architecture of the HTRC related to representation of collections, faceted browsing, identifiers, etc.

|Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

NEH Office of Digital Humanities Releases Videos of 2011 Digital Humanities Start-Up Grant Project Directors’ Presentations

Posted in Digital Humanities, Grants on February 19th, 2012

The NEH's Office of Digital Humanities has released short videos of project directors of 2011 Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants discussing their projects.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

We're happy to say that we now have videos from the annual Office of Digital Humanities Project Directors Meeting, held September 27, 2011 at the Old Post Office in Washington, DC. This meeting brought together top researchers in the digital humanities from across the United States.

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

Ithaka S+R Research Support Services for Scholars: History Project. Interim Report: Interviews with Research Support Professionals

Posted in Digital Humanities, Scholarly Communication on February 16th, 2012

Ithaka S+R has released the Ithaka S+R Research Support Services for Scholars: History Project. Interim Report: Interviews with Research Support Professionals.

Here's an excerpt:

Funded by the NEH, Ithaka S+R’s History Project, part of the Research Support Services for Scholars Program, will explore the information support needs and changing research practices of academic historians in the United States. The evolution of technology and its impact on scholarship in the humanities has sparked and sustained the wide-spread Digital Humanities movement. Historians in particular have engaged new technologies, and the subsequently enabled research methodologies and publication platforms are transforming the field. Consequently, many support service providers would like to better understand the evolving practices of historians and adapt their services to facilitate these new processes.

For the first phase of the Research Support Services for Scholars History Project, Ithaka S+R interviewed professionals who work in support of the scholarly life cycle of historians. Before interviewing faculty directly, it was important to establish an understanding of the breadth of support available to history faculty on campus, as well as the environment and institutions that support their research from concept to publication. The goal for this set of interviews was to explore the different types of service models currently engaged for supporting history research on campus and the challenges that research support professionals are facing in today’s rapidly evolving research environment.

| Digital Scholarship's Digital/Print Books | Digital Scholarship |

Journal of Digital Humanities to Launch in March

Posted in Digital Humanities, E-Journals, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 15th, 2012

The Journal of Digital Humanities will launch this March.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Digital Humanities Now is pleased to announce the Journal of Digital Humanities (ISSN 2165-6673), forthcoming in March 2012. In this comprehensive, peer-reviewed journal we will feature the best scholarship, projects, and tools produced by the digital humanities community in the previous quarter.

The Journal of Digital Humanities will offer expanded coverage of the digital humanities in three ways. First, we publish scholarly work beyond the traditional research article. Second, we select content from open and public discussions in the field. Third, we encourage continued discussion through peer-to-peer review.

The journal will be comprised of individual works that were selected as Editors' Choice in Digital Humanities Now. These works range from written texts, to visual arguments, to audio-visual presentations. In order to promote the peer review of non-traditional scholarship, each issue will include solicited reviews of digital tools. When the community focuses extensively on a particular topic, a special section of the issue will feature the broader conversation. In our inaugural issue, Natalia Cecire, a postdoctoral fellow at the Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry at Emory University, will introduce and guest edit a special section about theory and the digital humanities.

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, Version 80 | Digital Scholarship |

CLIR and NITLE Will Launch Anvil Academic, a "Digital Publisher for the Humanities"

Posted in Digital Humanities, Publishing on February 14th, 2012

The Council on Library and Information Resources and the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education will launch Anvil Academic, a "digital publisher for the humanities," in late 2012.

Here's an excerpt from the press release :

Anvil will focus on publishing new forms of scholarship that cannot be adequately conveyed in the traditional monograph.

"Increasingly, research in the humanities is dependent on large data sets and involves sophisticated algorithms and visualizations in the execution of that research and in the construction of the products of scholarship. Anvil will capture the environment in which this research is conducted: a linked ecology of scholarly expression, data, and tools of analysis that will over time become itself a place for new knowledge discovery," said CLIR President Chuck Henry.

Works published through Anvil will be available through Creative Commons licenses on the Web and as apps on portable devices. The title production system will be developed jointly by NITLE and CLIR for use by other institutions, each of which would have the opportunity to publish under its own imprint. . . .

"An important part of the Anvil experiment will be developing and testing new revenue models," said NITLE Executive Director Joey King. "Our current models, which rely heavily on institutional subsidies, author subventions, and revenue from sales of printed books, are not proving to be sustainable. With Anvil, we intend to explore alternative paths to sustainability as rigorously as we explore new publishing models."

The program received startup funding from the Brown Foundation, Inc., in Houston, Texas. Stanford University, the University of Virginia, Washington University in St. Louis, Bryn Mawr College, Amherst College, Middlebury College, and Southwestern University will also provide funds and staffing. Anvil Academic Publishing will work closely with innovative programs developed by the University of Michigan, especially MPublishing, and draw on Johns Hopkins University's exemplary experience with digital humanities project development.

| Digital Scholarship's Digital/Print Books | Digital Scholarship |


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