"EPUB 3.1 Now Proposed Specification"

IDPF has released "EPUB 3.1 Now Proposed Specification."

Here's an excerpt:

Work on EPUB 3.1 began in October of 2015, with a goal of simplifying the format and better aligning with the Open Web Platform. . . .

The EPUB 3.1 revision also introduces a new accessibility specification and techniques document. Although developed as part of EPUB 3.1 and to provide guidance on making conforming EPUB publications accessible, these new documents are designed to be equally applicable to older versions of the specification.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Outputs of the NISO Alternative Assessment Project

NISO has released Outputs of the NISO Alternative Assessment Project.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The National Information Standards Organization has published NISO RP-25-2016, Outputs of the NISO Alternative Assessment Project. This recommended practice on altmetrics, an expansion of the tools available for measuring the scholarly impact of research in the knowledge environment, was developed by working groups that were part of NISO's Altmetrics Initiative, a project funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The document outlines altmetrics definitions and use cases, alternative outputs in scholarly communications, data metrics, and persistent identifiers in scholarly communications. This guidance was necessary because, before the project began, scholars had long expressed dissatisfaction with traditional measures of success, such as the Impact Factor, but needed standards relating to other viable assessment methods.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

SUSHI-Lite: Deploying SUSHI as a Lightweight Protocol for Exchanging Usage via Web Services (Draft for Comment)

NISO has released SUSHI-Lite: Deploying SUSHI as a Lightweight Protocol for Exchanging Usage via Web Services, a draft for comment.

Here's an excerpt:

ANSI/NISO Z39.93-2014, also known as the SUSHI (Standardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative) standard, is the key to automating the harvesting of COUNTER (Counting Online Usage of NeTworked Electronic Resources) usage statistics. SUSHI is a critical standard for librarians charged with measuring and monitoring the use of their online collections by eliminating hours of painstaking effort that would otherwise be spent locating, retrieving and loading usage reports. However, environmental requirements evolve and standards like SUSHI need to update to serve these requirements. The introduction of various applications into the marketplace which offer alternative metrics, the development of the COUNTER Journal Usage Factor, the flourishing of institutional repositories and need to capture usage from them, and continued progress towards open and integrated systems in general, have all made an impact on how usage is consumed and exchanged. There is now a need for more lightweight technologies that will allow smaller sets of usage data to be exchanged in real-time.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Developing and Implementing a Technical Framework for Interoperable Rights Statements"

Mark Matienzo has published "Developing and Implementing a Technical Framework for Interoperable Rights Statements" in DPLA Updates.

Here's an excerpt:

Within the Technical Working Group of the International Rights Statements Working Group, we have been focusing our efforts on identifying a set of requirements and a technically sound and sustainable plan to implement the rights statements under development. Now that two of the Working Group's white papers have been released, we realized it was a good time to build on the introductory blog post by our Co-Chairs, Emily Gore and Paul Keller. Accordingly, we hope this post provides a good introduction to our technical white paper, Recommendations for the Technical Infrastructure for Standardized International Rights Statements, and more generally, how our thinking has changed throughout the activities of the working group.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Demand-Driven Acquisition (DDA) of Monographs

NISO has released Demand-Driven Acquisition (DDA) of Monographs.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

This is a new project to develop recommended practices for the Demand-Driven Acquisition (DDA) of Monographs. Many libraries have embraced DDA (also referred to as patron-driven acquisition) to present many more titles to their patrons for potential use and purchase than would ever be feasible under the traditional purchase model. If implemented correctly, DDA can make it possible to purchase only what is needed, allowing libraries to spend the same amount of money as they previously spent on monographs, but with a higher rate of use. However, this model requires libraries to develop and implement new procedures for adding titles to a "consideration pool", for keeping unowned titles available for purchase for some future period, often years after publication, for providing discovery methods of titles in the pool, establishing rules on when a title gets purchased or only temporarily leased, and how potential titles are discovered, and for handling of multiple formats of a title.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

ResourceSync Framework Specification (ANSI/NISO Z39.99-2014)

NISO has released the ResourceSync Framework Specification (ANSI/NISO Z39.99-2014).

Here's an excerpt:

The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) and the Open Archives Initiative (OAI) announce the publication of the ResourceSync Framework Specification (ANSI/NISO Z39.99-2014)—a new American National Standard for the Web detailing various capabilities that a server can implement to allow third-party systems to remain synchronized with its evolving resources. The ResourceSync joint project, funded with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and Jisc, was initiated to develop a new open standard on the real-time synchronization of web resources.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

NISO Draft for Comment: Demand-Driven Acquisition of Monographs

NISO has released a draft of NISO RP-20-201x, Demand-Driven Acquisition of Monographs for comment.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) is seeking comments on the draft recommended practice Demand-Driven Acquisition of Monographs (NISO RP-20-201x). Launched in June 2012, the NISO Demand Driven Acquisition (DDA) Working Group was charged with developing a flexible model for DDA (also referred to as patron-driven acquisition) that works for publishers, vendors, aggregators, and libraries. The draft Recommended Practice discusses and makes recommendations about key aspects of DDA, goals and objectives of a DDA program, choosing parameters of the program, profiling options, managing MARC records for DDA, removing materials from the consideration pool, assessment of the program, providing long-term access to un-owned content, consortial considerations for DDA, and public library DDA.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

Information Standards Quarterly Issue on "2012 Year in Review and State of the Standards"

Information Standards Quarterly has published a special issue on "2012 Year in Review and State of the Standards."

Here's an excerpt from the announcement :

"NISO has a very active standards and recommended practices development pipeline with more than 20 active projects," explains Nettie Lagace, NISO's Associate Director for Programs. "In 2012, we published two new standards, the revision of a two-part standard, two new recommended practices, two recommended practice revisions, and a new white paper. We also launched three new initiatives and were awarded two new grants from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. These are all described in more detail in this issue of ISQ."

"NISO's role as the U.S. Administrator for the ISO TC 46 Committee on Information and Documentation and the Secretariat for the subcommittee on Identification and Description ensures that our community has an active role in international standards development as well," said Cynthia Hodgson, ISQ Managing Editor and a consultant for NISO who helps manage the ISO work. "Our members not only vote on these ISO standards ballots, they also provide critical comments to the development working groups and volunteer to be members of these groups to help shape these international standards. This issue summarizes the work of TC 46 and its four subcommittees during 2012."

| Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap |

ResourceSync Framework Specification—Beta Draft

NISO and the Open Archives Initiative have released ResourceSync Framework Specification—Beta Draft.

Here's an excerpt:

This ResourceSync specification describes a synchronization framework for the web consisting of various capabilities that allow third party systems to remain synchronized with a server's evolving resources. The capabilities can be combined in a modular manner to meet local or community requirements. The specification also describes how a server can advertise the synchronization capabilities it supports and how third party systems can discover this information. The specification repurposes the document formats defined by the Sitemap protocol and introduces extensions for them.

| A Look Back at 22 Years as an Open Access Publisher | Digital Scholarship |

Recommended Practices for Online Supplemental Journal Article Materials

NISO has released Recommended Practices for Online Supplemental Journal Article Materials.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) and the National Federation for Advanced Information Services (NFAIS) have published a new Recommended Practice on Online Supplemental Journal Article Materials (NISO RP-15-2013). Supplemental materials are increasingly being added to journal articles, but until now there has been no recognized set of practices to guide in the selection, delivery, discovery, and preservation of these materials. To address this gap, NISO and NFAIS jointly sponsored an initiative to establish best practices that would provide guidance to publishers and authors for management of supplemental materials and would address related problems for librarians, abstracting and indexing services, and repository administrators. The Supplemental Materials project involved two teams working in tandem: one to address business practices and one to focus on technical issues. This new publication is the combined outcome of the two groups' work.

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 ( paperback and PDF file; over 3,800 entries) | Digital Scholarship |

EPUB for Archival Preservation

The Koninklijke Bibliotheek has released EPUB for Archival Preservation.

Here's an excerpt:

Over the last few years, the EPUB format has become increasingly popular in the consumer market. A number of publishers have indicated their wish to use EPUB for supplying their electronic publications to the KB. In response to this, the KB's Departments of Collection and Collection Care requested an initial study to investigate the suitability of the format for archival preservation. The main questions were:

  • What are the main characteristics of EPUB?
  • What functionality does EPUB provide, and is this sufficient for representing e.g. content with sophisticated layout and typography requirements?
  • How well is the EPUB supported by software tools that are used in (pre-)ingest workflows?
  • How suitable is EPUB for archival preservation? What are the main risks?

| Digital Curation Bibliography: Preservation and Stewardship of Scholarly Works | Digital Scholarship |

ESIP "Interagency Data Stewardship/Principles" and "Interagency Data Stewardship/Citations/Provider Guidelines" Approved

The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners has approved its "Interagency Data Stewardship/Principles" and "Interagency Data Stewardship/Citations/Provider Guidelines."

Here's an excerpt from "Data Management and the ESIP Federation" by Ruth Duerr:

Why do I think that this was significant? Simply because it represents the first time that a large and diverse set of US Mission agencies, data centers, research groups, commercial companies, tool developers, and even individuals have come together and agreed that data stewardship is important. They saw it to be important enough to codify into standard practices for data and recognized that data citation is something that needs to become part of the culture of science and that it is past time to make that happen.

| Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

COUNTER Code of Practice for Usage Factors, Draft Release 1

COUNTER (Counting Online Usage of Networked Electronic Resources) has released the COUNTER Code of Practice for Usage Factors, Draft Release 1.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The Draft Release 1 of the COUNTER Code of Practice for Usage Factors, is one of the most significant outcomes to-date of the Usage Factor project, and is an important part of this, the final Stage of the project, which will take Usage Factor forward to full implementation. This Draft Release 1 is based on well-established COUNTER standards, procedures and protocols; it is designed to enable the recording and reporting by publishers of credible, consistent and compatible global Usage Factors for online publications hosted by them (and incorporating usage of these publications on other platforms that are capable of delivering COUNTER-compliant usage statistics). While Release 1 of this Code of Practice focuses on Usage Factors for journals, it is envisaged that its scope will be extended in subsequent Releases to cover other online publications, such as books and reference works.

| Digital Scholarship's Digital Bibliographies | Digital Scholarship |

Audit and Certification of Trustworthy Digital Repositories

The Council of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) has released Audit and Certification of Trustworthy Digital Repositories, which is a recommended practice.

Here's an excerpt:

In 2002, Research Libraries Group (RLG) and Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) jointly published Trusted Digital Repositories: Attributes and Responsibilities (reference [B2]), which further articulated a framework of attributes and responsibilities for trusted, reliable, sustainable digital repositories capable of handling the range of materials held by large and small cultural heritage and research institutions. . . . .

OAIS included a Roadmap for follow-on standards which included 'standard(s) for accreditation of archives'. It was agreed that RLG and National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) would take this particular topic forward and the later published the TRAC (reference [B3]) document which combined ideas from OAIS (reference [1]) and Trusted Digital Repositories: Attributes and Responsibilities (TDR—reference [B2]).

The current document follows on from TRAC in order to produce an ISO standard.

| Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

NISO Releases ESPReSSO: Establishing Suggested Practices Regarding Single Sign-On

The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) has released ESPReSSO: Establishing Suggested Practices Regarding Single Sign-On.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

Currently a hybrid environment of authentication practices exists, including older methods of userid/password, IP authentication, and/or proxy servers along with newer federated authentication protocols such as Athens and Shibboleth. The ESPReSSO recommended practice identifies changes that can be made immediately to improve the authentication experience for the user, even in a hybrid situation, while encouraging both publishers/service providers and libraries to transition to the newer Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML)-based authentication, such as Shibboleth.

| New: Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, Version 80 | Digital Scholarship |

Best Practices for TEI in Libraries: A Guide for Mass Digitization, Automated Workflows, and Promotion of Interoperability with XML Using the TEI

The TEI Special Interest Group on Libraries has released version three of the Best Practices for TEI in Libraries: A Guide for Mass Digitization, Automated Workflows, and Promotion of Interoperability with XML Using the TEI.

Here's an excerpt from:

There are many different library text digitization projects, serving a variety of purposes. With this in mind, these Best Practices are meant to be as inclusive as possible by specifying five encoding levels. These levels are meant to allow for a range of practice, from wholly automated text creation and encoding, to encoding that requires expert content knowledge, analysis, and editing. The encoding levels are not strictly cumulative: while higher levels tend to build upon lower levels by including more elements, higher levels are not supersets because some elements used at lower levels are not used at higher levels—often because more specific elements replace generic elements.

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

NISO Receives Mellon Grant to Support E-Book Annotation Sharing Workshops

NISO has received a Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant to support two e-book annotation sharing workshops.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) has been awarded a $48,500 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to fund two standards incubation workshops, which it will lead with the Internet Archive, on the topic of E-Book Annotation Sharing and Social Reading. These meetings will be held in conjunction with the Frankfurt Book Fair in Frankfurt, Germany, on October 10, 2011, and the Books In Browsers Meeting in San Francisco, on October 26, 2011. The Mellon Foundation grant will pay for the planning, organization, and direct meeting expenses for the two workshops, for which NISO will conduct the majority of the planning, organization and logistical support.

The two workshops will advance the discussions around system requirements for annotation sharing-including technical challenges of citation location and systems interoperability-and around the development and implementation of a consensus solution for these issues. The objectives of the meetings are to provide input to a NISO-sponsored working group on scope, goals and any initial work the group undertakes; and the advancement of a syntax specification that will be further vetted by a standards working group for how bookmarks and annotations are located and shared in digital books.

| Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Institutional Repository Bibliography | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 |

"Standards for Web Applications on Mobile: February 2011 Current State and Roadmap"

W3C has released "Standards for Web Applications on Mobile: February 2011 Current State and Roadmap" by Dominique Hazaël-Massieux.

Here's an excerpt:

This document summarizes the various technologies developed in W3C that increases the power of Web applications, and how they apply more specifically to the mobile context, as of February 2011. . . .

The features that these technologies add to the Web platform are organized under the following categories:

  • Graphics
  • Multimedia
  • Forms
  • User interactions
  • Data storage
  • Sensors and hardware integration
  • Network
  • Communication
  • Packaging
  • Performance & Optimization

| Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

A Standards-based, Open and Privacy-aware Social Web

The W3C Incubator Group has released A Standards-based, Open and Privacy-aware Social Web.

Here's an excerpt:

The Social Web is a set of relationships that link together people over the Web. The Web is an universal and open space of information where every item of interest can be identified with a URI. While the best known current social networking sites on the Web limit themselves to relationships between people with accounts on a single site, the Social Web should extend across the entire Web. Just as people can call each other no matter which telephone provider they belong to, just as email allows people to send messages to each other irrespective of their e-mail provider, and just as the Web allows links to any website, so the Social Web should allow people to create networks of relationships across the entire Web, while giving people the ability to control their own privacy and data. The standards that enable this should be open and royalty-free. We present a framework for understanding the Social Web and the relevant standards (from both within and outside the W3C) in this report, and conclude by proposing a strategy for making the Social Web a "first-class citizen" of the Web.

| Digital Scholarship |

NISO Releases Cost of Resource Exchange (CORE) Protocol

NISO has released the Cost of Resource Exchange (CORE) Protocol (NISO RP-10-2010).

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

NISO is pleased to announce the publication of its latest Recommended Practice, CORE: Cost of Resource Exchange Protocol (NISO RP-10-2010). This Recommended Practice defines an XML schema to facilitate the exchange of financial information related to the acquisition of library resources between systems, such as an ILS and an ERMS.

CORE identifies a compact yet useful structure for query and delivery of relevant acquisitions data. "Sharing acquisitions information between systems has always been a difficult problem," said Ted Koppel, Agent Verso (ILS) Product Manager, Auto-Graphics, Inc. and co-chair of the CORE Working Group. "The rise of ERM systems made this problem even more acute. I'm glad that we, through the CORE Recommended Practice, have created a mechanism for data sharing, reuse, and delivery." Co-chair Ed Riding, Catalog Program Manager at the LDS Church History Library, added, "The CORE Recommended Practice provides a solution for libraries attempting to avoid duplicate entry and for systems developers intent on not reinventing the wheel. I look forward to the development of systems that can easily pull cost information from one another and believe CORE can help facilitate that."

CORE was originally intended for publication as a NISO standard. However, following a draft period of trial use that ended March 2010, the CORE Working Group and NISO's Business Information Topic Committee voted to approve the document as a Recommended Practice. This decision was in part based on the lack of uptake during the trial period as a result of recent economic conditions, and was motivated by the high interest in having CORE available for both current and future development as demand for the exchange of cost information increases. Making the CORE protocol available as a Recommended Practice allows ILS and ERM vendors, subscription agents, open-source providers, and other system developers to now implement the XML framework for exchanging cost information between systems. "I am pleased that CORE is now available for systems developers to begin using in order to facilitate the exchange of cost information between systems in a library environment," commented Todd Carpenter, NISO's Managing Director.

WP Twitter Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com