Archive for August, 2012

Web Services Librarian at University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus’ Health Sciences Library

Posted in Library IT Jobs on August 26th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus' Health Sciences Library is recruiting a Web Services Librarian.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus' Health Sciences Library (HSL) seeks an entry-level, innovative, service-oriented Web Services Librarian (WSL). The successful candidate will coordinate, develop and maintain web sites and services for the library. These include web resources provided by vendors, the library's web site, mobile site, catalog, repository, weblog, and other web sites and services as required.

"Modern Technology, Leaky Copyrights and Claims of Harm: Insights from the Curious History of Photocopying"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars on August 26th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Diane Leenheer Zimmerman has self-archived "Modern Technology, Leaky Copyrights and Claims of Harm: Insights from the Curious History of Photocopying" in SSRN.

Here's an excerpt:

The core problem this paper attempts to address what should count as "economic harm" in determining whether particular kinds of copying are appropriately treated as copyright infringement. . . . The argument that copying without permission, especially on the internet, is per se harmful has led to a variety of increasingly stringent self-help and legislative measures designed to prevent and to punish the activity, although often without evidence of success. But researchers who study such things continue to find evidence of the damage, at least from noncommercial activity, elusive. The reasons this might be so, and the inferences to be drawn from it are an interesting subject for copyright theorists to consider, but so far, very little serious attention has been paid to examining the phenomenon. This paper is an effort to begin filling in that blank by setting out a case study of a rampant form of copying technology that long pre-dates the internet: photocopying. In many ways, the photocopying story is a microcosm of what happens when a new technology bursts onto the copyright scene, and as such, it is a possible source of learning about how copyright should treat the issue of noncommercial copying generally, whether it happens compliments of Xerox, or compliments of your regional ISP.

| Digital Scholarship |

Digital Scholarship Initiatives Coordinator at Cornell University Library

Posted in Digital Library Jobs on August 26th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Cornell University Library is recruiting a Digital Scholarship Initiatives Coordinator.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The Cornell University Library is seeking a Digital Scholarship Initiatives Coordinator. Reporting to the AUL for Digital Scholarship & Preservation Services (DSPS), the Digital Scholarship Initiatives Coordinator will provide leadership in conceptualizing and implementing new digital scholarship and preservation initiatives with a focus on needs assessment, requirements analysis, and business planning. One of the key responsibilities will be facilitating the implementation of CUL's scholarly communication outreach program by partnering with subject liaisons to understand service needs, coordinate awareness sessions, and facilitate forming new partnerships with faculty in pursuing digital research and teaching initiatives.

| Digital Scholarship |

"Ten Recommendations for Libraries to Get Started with Research Data Management"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Research Libraries on August 26th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The LIBER working group on E-Science has released "Ten Recommendations for Libraries to Get Started with Research Data Management."

Here's an excerpt:

LIBER installed the 'E-Science working group' in 2010 to investigate the role libraries can and should play in the field of E-Science. The group decided to focus on research data as it was felt to be the most urgent element of e-science that is of relevance to the community of (research) libraries. The group has held three workshops, the first during the LIBER conference 2011 in Barcelona, the second during the IDCC 2011 conference in Bristol and the third and last one during the LIBER conference 2012 in Tartu. The results of the first two workshops were used as a basis for compiling recommendations to the LIBER ommunity. The "10 recommendations for libraries to support research data management" (see side bar) were finalized and prioritized during the final workshop at the LIBER-conference in Tartu.

| Digital Curation Resource Guide | Digital Scholarship |

Current News: Twitter Updates for 8/23/12

Posted in Current News: DigitalKoans Twitter Updates on August 23rd, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

| Digital Scholarship |

Digital Repository Manager at University of Alabama Libraries

Posted in Digital Library Jobs on August 23rd, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The University of Alabama Libraries are recruiting a Digital Repository Manager.

Here's an excerpt from the ad (requisition number: 007089):

The Digital Repository Manager will be focused on the management and support of our growing repository of content, as well as development of support for new and better functionality. This person will research software developments in the field and potentially modify those we adopt to meet our own needs. He or she would be deeply involved in infrastructure development and support for long-term access. The Digital Repository Manager will analyze technical and work flow problems and devise and implement solutions.

| Digital Scholarship |

NISO Releases JATS: Journal Article Tag Suite, ANSI/NISO Z39.96-2012

Posted in Metadata, Scholarly Journals, Standards on August 23rd, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

NISO has released JATS: Journal Article Tag Suite, ANSI/NISO Z39.96-2012.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) announces the publication of a new American National Standard, JATS: Journal Article Tag Suite, ANSI/NISO Z39.96-2012. JATS provides a common XML format in which publishers and archives can exchange journal content by preserving the intellectual content of journals independent of the form in which that content was originally delivered. In addition to the element and attribute descriptions, three journal article tag sets (the Archiving and Interchange Tag Set, the Journal Publishing Tag Set, and the Article Authoring Tag Set) are part of the standard. While designed to describe the textual and graphical content of journal articles, it can also be used for some other materials, such as letters, editorials, and book and product reviews. "Al

| Digital Scholarship's Digital/Print Books | Digital Scholarship |

Special Collections & Digital Initiatives Librarian at Longwood University’s Greenwood Library

Posted in Digital Library Jobs on August 23rd, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Longwood University's Greenwood Library is recruiting a Special Collections & Digital Initiatives Librarian.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

Longwood University's Greenwood Library seeks a creative, dynamic and service-oriented individual to serve as the new Special Collections & Digital Initiatives Librarian who will shape the future direction of the department and contribute to the strategic plan of the Library. The successful candidate will provide expertise and leadership in areas of special collections, archives, and digital project management. S/he will have primary responsibility for launching and maintaining the university's institutional repository that is hosted on the Digital Commons platform.

| Digital Scholarship |

You’ve Got to Walk Before You Can Run: First Steps for Managing Born-Digital Content Received on Physical Media

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Libraries, Reports and White Papers on August 23rd, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

OCLC Research has released You've Got to Walk Before You Can Run: First Steps for Managing Born-Digital Content Received on Physical Media,

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

You've Got to Walk Before You Can Run: First Steps for Managing Born-Digital Content Received on Physical Media is intended for anyone who doesn't know where to begin in managing born-digital materials. It errs on the side of simplicity and describes what is truly necessary to start managing born-digital content on physical media, and it presents a list of the basic steps without expanding on archival theory or the use of particular software tools. It does not assume that policies are in place or that those performing the tasks are familiar with traditional archival practices, nor does it assume that significant IT support is available.

Read more about it at "Defining 'Born Digital': An Essay by Ricky Erway, OCLC Research."

| Digital Curation Bibliography: Preservation and Stewardship of Scholarly Works | Digital Scholarship |

Current News: Twitter Updates for 8/22/12

Posted in Current News: DigitalKoans Twitter Updates on August 22nd, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

| Digital Scholarship |

Associate Dean for Digital Scholarship and Technology Services at Florida State University Libraries

Posted in Digital Library Jobs on August 22nd, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Florida State University Libraries are recruiting an Associate Dean for Digital Scholarship and Technology Services.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The FSU Libraries seek an innovative, experienced information professional to work with a variety of constituencies at a major research university to (1) provide high-quality digital information services, (2) develop a robust institutional repository and other tools that support digital scholarship, (3) encourage innovation in digital scholarship, (4) provide leadership on scholarly communication issues through broad-based solutions that work in a diverse, fast-paced academic environment.

| Digital Scholarship |

"A Portrait of Today’s Smartphone User"

Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers on August 22nd, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Online Publishers Association has released "A Portrait of Today's Smartphone User."

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

The OPA collaborated with Frank N. Magid Associates, Inc. to conduct the study, which found that the population of smartphone users is growing rapidly. An estimated 44% of the U.S. internet population, ages 8-64, owns a smartphone (107 million consumers*), up from 31% in 2011 (73 million consumers*) and expected to reach 57% by Q2 2013 (142 million consumers*). Aside from making phone calls, 93% of smartphone users regularly access content and information above any other activity, followed by accessing the internet (59%) and checking email (58%). The primary types of content smartphone consumers access are weather information (47%), video (31%), local news (29%) and national news (24%).


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